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Full text of "American University Catalog"

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 



WASHINGTON, D.C 









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2006-2007 CATALOG 



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Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

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http://www.archive.org/details/americanuniversi2006amer 



American University 

Catalog 



2006-2007 Edition 
^ectiie Fall 2006 



Washington, D.C 



Correspondence Directory 



American University 

4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW 

X^shington, DC 20016 

General Information: 202-885-1000 

www.american.edu 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Battelle 

Kogod School of Business 



Sdiool of Communictf on 

Mary Qraydon Center 

School of International Service 



202-885-2446 

fax 202-885-2429 



202-«85-1900 

fax 202-885-1992 



202-885-2060 

fax 202-885-2099 



202-885-1600 

fax 202-885-2494 



American University Catalog is published by 

the Office of the Univa^ity Registrar 
Linda Bolden-Pitcfaer, University Registrar 
Mary-Hlen Jones, Assistant University Registrar/Editor 
Brian Sinclair, Curriculuin/Publications Coordin^or 
in cooperation with Uiiivasity Publications 



School of Public Affars 

W^id 



202-885-2940 

fax 202-885-2353 



Washington College of Law 

4801 Massachusrfts Ave. NW 



202-274-4000 

fax 202-274-41 30 



Admisaons 



202-885-6000 

fax 202-885-6014 



Alumni Programs 



Campus Life 

Butler Pavihon 401 



Fnandal Aid 



Media Relations 



202-885-5960 

fax 202-885-5964 



202-885-3310 

fax 202-885-1769 



202-885-6100 

fex 202-885-1129 



202-885-5950 

fax 202-885-5959 



Limitations on Catalog Provisions 

The educational process necesatates change. This publica- 
tion must be considered infonnational and not bending on the 
university. 

Each step of ttie educational process, from admission ttirou^ 
graduation, requires appropriate approval by university offi- 
cials. The university must, therefore, reserve the right to change 
admission requiranents or to refuse to grant credit or a degree if 
a studert does not sat isly the uni vo^ty, in its sole judgment, fliat 
he or she has satisfactorily met its requirements. 



Registrar 

Asbury 2nd floor 

Student Accounts 

A*ury300 

University Relations 



202-885-2200 

fax 202-885-1052 



202-885-3541 

fex 202-885-1139 



202-885-5900 

fax 202-895-4998 



University Liability 

Faculty, students, staff, and guests are responable for their 
personal property, clothing, and possessicos. The university 
does not cany any insurance to cover losses of such articles nor 
does it assume any responsibility for such losses. 



Contents 



University Adniinistiaticn and Board ofTnistees 2 

Academic Calendar 3 

Introduction 5 

University ftofile 5 

Enrollment, Fall 2005 11 

Degrees Conferred, 2004-2005 11 

Undergraduate Piograms 12 

Graduate Programs 13 

Admission Requirements 15 

Undergradiuie Study 15 

Graduate Study 17 

litemational Students 18 

Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 19 

Tuition, Housing and Dinging, and Fees 19 

Undergraduate Financial Aid 24 

Graduate Financial Aid 26 

Veterans' Bene fits 29 

Canpuslife 31 

Student Learning and Devebixnait Services 31 

Campus Life Centers 33 

Irtercultural Programs and Services 35 

Career Services, Internships, aid Mferit Awards 37 

Registration 39 

Academic Regulations 45 

Academic Integrity Code 45 

Student Academic Grievance Policy 45 

Student Records 46 

Grading System 49 

Graduation 49 

Undeigraduate Academic Honors 50 

Univeiaty Honors PrograoL 50 

Graduate Academic Standaids and Degree 

RequirertBnts 51 

Undergraduate Academic Standaids emd 

Etegree Requirements 57 

Undergraduate University Degree Requirements .... 62 

College Writing and English Competency 62 

University Mathematics Requirement 63 

General Education Ftegram 65 



College of Arts and Sciences 75 

American Studies 77 

Anthropology 78 

Arab Studies 82 

Art 83 

Asian Studies 91 

Biology 93 

Chemistry 95 

Computer Science, Audio Technology, and Physics. . . 98 

Economics 106 

School of Education, Teaching and Health 112 

Environnental Studies 126 

History 130 

Jewish Studies 133 

Language and Foreign Studies 134 

Liberal Studies 142 

Literature 143 

Mathematics and Statistics 145 

Multi-Ethnic Studies 151 

North American Studies 152 

Performing Arts 153 

Philosophy and Rehgion 159 

Pre-engtneering 162 

Prelaw 162 

Piemedical 164 

Psychology 165 

Sociology 169 

Teaching Enghsh to Speakers of Other Languages. . . 172 
\\t)men's and Gender Studies 174 

Kogod Sdiool of Business 176 

School of Commimication 192 

School of Intanational Service 205 

School ofPublic Affaire 236 

Government 238 

Justice, Law and Society 246 

Pubhc Administration and Fbhcy 252 

Wadiington College of Law 261 

Wadrington Semester 263 

AU Abroad/Abroad at AU 265 

Covffse DescrqjtioiB 269 

Faculty, 2005-2006 398 

Index 425 

Campus Map inside back cover 



University Administration 



Board of Trustees 



Cornelius M. Kenvin, Interim President 

Ivy E Broder, Interim Provost 

Gail S. Hanson, Vice President of Campus life 

Mary E. K^maid, Vice President and General Counsel 

Donald L. Myers, Vice President of Finance and Treasurer 

Robert A. Pastor, Vice President cf International /^airs 

Haig Mardirosian, Acting Dean of Academic /^airs 
Richard M. Duiand, Dean, Kogod School of Business 
Louis W. Goodman, Dean, School (f International Service 
Claudio M Grossman, Dean, Washington College cfLaw 
Larry Kiikman, Dean, School of Communication 
William M LeoQrande, Dean, School of Public Affcars 
Kay J. Mussell, Deani College cfAns and Sciences 

Linda Bolden^ftchei; University Registrar 
Diana Vogelsong, Acting University Librarian 



Gary M. Abramson,* Chair 

ThoriBS A. Gottschalk, Vice Chair 

Stephanie M. Bennetl-Smith 

David M. CamiBn 

Edward R. Can* 

Jack C. Cassell* 

GaryD. Cohn* 

I^unela M. Deese* 

Jeroms King Dd Pirw 

David R.Drobis* 

FuadEl-Mbri 

HaniM. S.Farsi* 

Gisela B. Huberman* 

C. Nicholas Keating, Jr.* 

Cornelius M Kerwin* 

Margery Kraus* 

Charles H. Lydecker* 

A. Robyn Mathias* 

Regina L. MueUhauaer* 

Matthew S. Pittinsky* 

Arthur J. Rothkopf 

Mark L. Schneider 

JohnR. Sdiol 

Neal A. Sharma* 

Jeffrey A. Sine * 

*Aluima/alumaus of American University 



American ttoiveraty is an equal of^itunity and affirrtBtive action university and erqaloyer. American Univeraty does not 
dfecriminate on flie basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, personal appearance, sexual 
oiientation, gend^ identity and expression, family responsibilities, poKtical affiliation, disability, source of income, place of 
residence or business, or certain veteran status in its pnogiartK aud activities. For information, contact the Dean of Students 
(EX3S@amwicaaedu) , Director of Policy & Regulatory Affairs (employe erelationata} americai.edu) or Dean of Academic 
AlBurs, (academicaflairs@american.edu) , or at American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave., N.W., Wa^iigton, D.C. 
20016,202-885-1000. 



Academic Calendar 2006-2007 



I"he academic calendar is divided into fall and spring semesters of approximately 15 weeks each and summer sessions of 
varying length. The last vveek of the fall and spring soneslcrs is set aside for final examinations. If no final examination is given, 
the course will meet for a final class during the scheduled final examination period 

ITie holidays and vacations usually observed by the university are as foUows: Labor Day, llianksgiving (Wednesday -Sunday); 
Chiistmas Eve/Christmas Day and New Year's live/New Year's Day (included in the rtid-year iidersession break); Martin 
Luther King, h. Day, Inauguration Day (every four years); Memorial Day, and Independence Day. Spring break is the week 

following the spring semester midtenn. Classes continue until 10:40p.m the evening before a hoKday or vacafion period. 
Fall Semester 2006 



August 20-27 Su-Su 

August 25 F 

August 28 M 

September 1 F 



September 4 M 
September 6 W 
September 11 M 



Septemba-18 M 

September 21 Th 

Septembe- 25 M 

October 2 M 

October 13 F 

October 14 S 

October 20 F 

October 20-22 F-Su 

October 30 M 



Nowmber 1 W 

November 3 F 

November 10 F 

Nowmba- 29 W 

November 15 T 

November 21 T 
Novembo- 22-26 W-Su 

December 1 F 



December i 



M 



December U -12 M-T 
December 13 W 
December 14-1 6 Tb^ 
December 18 M 
December 1 5-22 F4^ 
Decemba- 25-26 M-T 
January 1-2 M-T 



Wefcome Wedc 

Last day to register for fall 2006 without a late fee 
Fall classes begin 

Late registration (with $50 fee) begins 

Fre^unaMmdergraduate transfer spring semester admission application deadline for students 
hving outside the United States 
Late registratian for fall ends 

Last day to drop MBA 1st Module courses for 100% refund and withotit a "W" recorded 
Labor Day; no classes, university oflSces closed 
Maftiematics Equivalency Examination 
Last day to add a fall course or change a grade option 
Last day to drop a fall course hr a 100% refund and without a " W" recorded 

Last day to drop MBA 1 st Module courses for a 50% refimd (no refunds for 1 st Modules after this date) 
Last day to drop a 611 course fora 50% refund 

Last day to add an intemffaip or Cooperative Education Field Experience 
Last day to drop MBA 1st Module courses 

Last day to drop a fell course for a 25% refund (no refunds after this date) 
Last day to add an independent reading course or study project 
Eariy warning notices due in Registrar's OfBoe 
Fall Break; no classes, univeraty oflSces open 
English Competency Examination 
Last day to drop a fall course (mid-term) 
Family Weekend 

Spring 2007 advance registration (with billing) begins 

Students registering for final semester begin sutxnitting applications for spring graduation 
MBA 2nd Module courses begin 

Undergraduate transfer spring semester admission application deadline for students 
living in the Ltaited States 

Last day to drop MBA 2nd Module courses for 1 00% refimd and without a " W" recorded 
Last day to drop MBA 2nd Module courses for a 50% refund (no refunds for 2nd \fodules afler tins date) 
Theses and dissertations due in deans' ofiBces for fall degree candidates 
La^ day to diop MBA 2nd Module courses 

Early Decision freeman fall semester admission/financial aid appUcation deadline 
Tuesday classes cancelled; Friday dasses meet 

Thanksgiving holiday; no classes; university offices closed Thirsday and Friday 
Fredunan spring sanester adrtissicn apiiicatbn deadline for students living in ttie Ltaited States 
Spring 2007 advance registration (with billing) ends 
Fall classes end 

Theses and dissertations due in Registrar's Office for fall degree candidates 
Fail final examinations 
Fall study day; no classes 
Fall final examinations 

Fall final examinations (for Wednesday dasses) 
Fall final grades due 
Wilier holiday; university offices dosed 
New Year holiday; university offices closed 



Academic Calendar 2006-2007 



SjH-ing Semester 2007 

January 7-14 Su-Su Spring Welcome Week 



January 12 
Jaiuary 15 

January 16 

January 22 

January 24 
January 29 



February 3 
FdjTuary 5 



M 



February 12 M 



Last day to legista- for spring 2007 wifcout a late fee 

Freshman fall semester admission appKcatioa deadline 

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, no dasses, university offices closed 

Spring classes begin 

Late registration (with $50 fee) begins 

Late registration fcr spring ends 

Last day to drop MBA 1st Nfodule coiBses Sx 100% refund and wUfaout a "W" recorded 

MathertBtics Equivalency Examination 

Last day to add a spring course ordiange a grade option 

Last day to drop a spring course fcr a 100% refund and without a "W" recorded 

Last day to drop MB A 1st Module courses fiw a 50% refimd (no refunds for 1st Modules after this date) 

En glish CoirpeterKy Examination 

Last day to drop aspring course for a 50% refund 

Last day to add an internship or Cooperative Education Field Experience 

Last dsy to (kop MBA 1st Module courses 

Last d^ to drop a spring course for a 25% refund (no icflinds after this date) 

Last day to add an independent reading course or study project 

Freshnsn fall semester financial aid application deadline 

Early warning notices due in Registrar's Office 

Undergraduate transfer fall and spring semester financial aid application deadline 

Last day to drop a spring class (rtrid-term) 

Spring break; no dasses, university offices open Nfonday through Friday 

MBA 2nd Module courses begin 

Last day to drop MBA 2nd Module courses for 100% refund and without a "W" recorded 

English Competency Examination 

Last day to drop MBA 2nd Module courses for a 50% refund (no refunds for 2nd Modules after tiiis date) 

Summer 2007 registration (with payment) end Fall 2007 advance registration (with billing) begins 

Theses and dissertations due in deans' offices for spring degree candidates 

Students registering for final semester begin submitting apphcations for sumnerand fell graduation 
F Last day to drop MBA 2nd Module courses 

M Spring classes end 

Theses and dissertations due in Registrar's Office for spring degree candidates 
T Undergraduate trarefer fen serrBsteradrtission application deadine for students living outside the LbitedStdes 

T-W Spring study days; no dasses 
Th-W Spring final examtnatioos 
T-M Spring final grades due 
S Honors Convocation 

Su CommencemBnt 



Th 

M 

Th 

F 

S-Su 

M 

F 

S 

F 

M 



February 15 
Fdmiary 19 
March 1 
March 9 
March 11-18 
March 19 
March 23 
March 24 
March 30 
April2 



April6 
April 30 

May 1 

May 1-2 

May 3-9 

May 8-14 

May 12 

May 13 

Summer Sessions 2007 (Dates subject to change) 

May 14 M 7-week summer session begins 

May 21 M First 6-week, first 3- week, and cross summa- sesaons begin 

May 28 M Memorial Day; no classes, university offices closed 

Jme 8 F First 3-week summer session ends 

June 2 S English CorDpetency Examination 

June 1 1 M Second 3-week sunmer session begins 

Jme 28 Th 7-week, seccnd 3-week, and first 6-week summer sessions end 

July 1 Su Undergraduate traosfer fall semester admission application deadline for studenU living in the United States 

July 2 M Second 6-week day and evening sumiBer sessions begin 

July 4 W Independence Day, no classes, university o ffices closed 

July 1 5 F Fall 2007 advance registration (with billing) ends 

July 20 F Theses and disseitatiorK due in deans' offices for summer degree candidates 

August 9 Th End of surmrBr sessions 

Theses and dissertations due in Registrar's Office for annmer degree candidates 



Introduction 



• University Profile 

• Undergraduate and Graduate Programs 

• Enrollment 



American Univereity was chartered by an Act of Congress in 
1 893 and founded mder the auspices of the IMted Methodist 
Church. Today it is an independent coeduc^onal university 
with more than 1 1 ,000 students enrofled in undergraduate, mas- 
ter's, doctoral,and professional degree programs. Located on an 
84-acTe residaitial campus in upper northwest Washington, 
D.C., the university attracts students fiomall 50 states, the Dis- 
trictofCohjidbia, Puerto Ricoandttie territories, andneaily 150 
foreign countries. 

A short distance ftom Washington's centers of government, 
business, research, commerce, and a1, the American University 
campus is located in a scenic residential area in Northwest 
Wadungton, D.C. The 37 campus buildings include the univer- 
sity hl^rary, administrative and academic buildings, residence 
halls, an interdenorrmational religious c«iter, and a sports cen- 
ter. Facilities include 244iour computer laboratories, radio and 
TV studios, sdence laboratories, art studios, recital halls, and a 
theatre. The 'Vtehington College of Law is located a half mile 
from the campus on Massachusetts Avenue. The satellite Tenley 
Campus, the location of the Washington Semester program, is 
located a mile from the university's main campus on NAraska 
Avenue. 

American Ltaiveisity offers a wide range of undergraduate 
and graduate programs throng its ax major divisions: College 
of Arts and Sciences; Kogod School of Business; Sdiool of 



Communicatian; School of Public Affairs; Sdiool of Iitema- 
tioiBl Service; and Washington College of Law. 

The distinguished faculty of American University indudes 
renowned expats and scholars of national and international rep- 
utation in public affairs, law, history, economics, busness, inter- 
national relations, education, science, communication, and the 
arts. In addition to fee over six hundwi membws ofits £ull-tinB 
faculty, adjunct faculty are drawn from the ^^feshington, DC. 
professional commmity, including policy makers, diplomats, 
journalists, artists, writers, scientists, and business feaders. 

The resources of a capital dty are unlike any other in the 
worid. Althou^ an important center of business, finance, ani 
media, next to govenmient, education is the largest industry in 
the District of Cohimbia. 

\\feshington,D.C. is a dty ofleaming resources in every dis- 
cipline, fiom the arts and humanities to the sciences to pubKc af- 
fairs The Smithsonian Institution, John F. Kamedy Center for 
the Fterfoiming Arts, Natbnal Gallay of Art, >fational Institutes 
of Health, National Library of Medicine, Library of Congress, 
National Archives, Workl Bank, Brookings Institution, more 
than 140 en±iassies and chaiK;eries, and the headquarters of 
many associations and international organizations are located in 
the Washington, DC. area. The libraries, museums, and art gal- 
leries of Wadiington contain unsurpassed coUectioTB. These re- 
sources are ates for researdi, field trips, internships, and 
errqioyrrEnt Because of these resources, American University 
students can put thdr education to work in Washington as they 
could nowhere else in the country. 



University Profile 



Historical Origins 

American IMversity was iiworporated by the government of 
the District of Coluniia in 1891 and chartered by Act of Con- 
gress in 1893 as a United Mefl»dist Chiach-related institution 
The university's first building was con^eted in 1898; its first 
clas graduated in 1916. 
Character 

American IMversity is a leader in global education, enrolling 
a diverse studait body fiom flirou^out tfie LSjited States and 
more than 160 countries and providing opportunities fca- aca- 



demic excellence, pubUc service, and intenidiq)s in the nation's 
capital and around ttte world. 

Location 

Residential area of upper northwest Washington, DC. 
Calendar 

Two sanesto^, summer sessions 
Student/Faculty Ratio 

14:1 



6 Intnxiuction 



Number of Faculty (Fall 2005) 

5S4 fufl-tirrK faculty vvith 498 in Ml-tirneteachingpositions 
(97 percent of the fiill-time feculty hold a doctoral degree or 
the highest degree in their field); 428 adjunct faculty 
Freshman Profde (Fall 2005) 

Average unweighted high sdiool GPA; 3.51 

Male/fanale ratio: 36/64 

Middle 50% SAT L 1180-1350 

Middle 50% ACT: 26-32 
Financial Aid 

Approximately 64 p)ercent of students receive some fonn of 

financial aid 
Academic Divisions 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Kogod School of Business 

Sdiool of Cwnmunication 

Sdiool of International Service 

Sdiool of PubUc Affairs 

Washington College of Law 

Academic Programs 

55 bachelor's programs 

48 master's programs 

8 doctoral programs 

J.D.,SJD.,andLL.M. 

Students have the opportunity to create individual 

interdisciplinary programs at flie bachelor's and masters's 

levels. Certificateprogiams and anassociatedegree program 

are offered as well. 

AU Abroad: Studeids may study in any subject area for a 

year, semester, or summer More than 65 stucfy abroad 

programs which span diverse cultures and languages on all 

continaits are available, with intensive language study 

and/or internships offered at many sites. 

Abroad at AU: International students have the opportunity 

to attend American University for a semester or year and 

become fully integrated into the academic, social, and 

cultural life of the university. 

Consortium of Universities of the Washington 

Metropolitan Area: American University participates in a 

program through which students may take courses not 

offered by their home institutions at any of the other 

consortium member schools. 

University Honors Program: A comprehensive program of 

honors options drawn from the General Education 

curriculum and departmental course offering? for qualified 

undergraduate students. The program is characterized by 

small saninars, individualized attention fixim faculty, unique 

access to the resources of Washington, D.C., and the special 

atmosjiiere of an honors community of corrmitted faculty 

and students. 

Washington Semester Program: undergraduate programs 

focusing on American politics (national government, public 

law); economic policy; gender and politics; international 

business and trade; international environment and 



development; international politics and foreign policy; 
justice, joumalism; peace and conflict resolution, and 
transfomnng communities; all indude internships. 
Campus Life 

The OfBce of Campus Life integrates students into a diverse 
university community; promotes their intellectual, social, 
and spiritual development; and, in collaboration with the 
faculty, prepares them for lifetong learning and global 
citizen diip. 

Campus Life offices include: Academic Support Csnter; 
Community Service; Coimseling Centa", DisabiUty Siqiport 
Savices; Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Ally 
Resource Center (GLBTA); Housing and Dining Programs; 
Intemational Student & Scholar Services (ISSS); Kay 
Spiritual Life Center; Learning Services; Mediation 
Services; Multicultural Affairs; New Student Programs; and 
Student Health Center. 
Career Center 

Support and programs for internships, co-ops, off carrpus 
federal work study, career preparation, nationally 
competitive merit awards , and comprehensive career 
services at the undergraduate and graduate levels Students 
and en^iloyers use an an-hne system — AU CareerWeb — to 
access internships and jobs as weU as job fairs and cairpus 
interviews. 
Cocurricular Activities 

Students may participate in student government, residence 
hall government, student media (faint, radio, and TV) and 
any of more than 160 clubs and organizations; 10 ftatemities 
and 11 sororities; and varsity, reoeational, and intramural 
sports. 
Honorary Societies 

Undei^graduate students have the opportunity to be elected to 
the AU chapter ofPhi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest honorary 
sdiolastic society for exceptional academic achievement in the 
Uberal arts. Election to the American University diapter of Phi 
K^jpa Phi is also available for quahfied students, as well as 
Golden Key (recognizing outstanding scholarship, service, and 
leaderdiip for students in all academic fields) and the National 
Society of CoUegiate Scholars (honoring students for outstand- 
ing scholarship and corrmunity service). 

Many academic disc^lines have chapters of national honor 
societies as well: 

Alpha Kappa Psi (Lambda Nu Ch^ter): dedicated to 

professional development, ettucal standards and service in 

business conduct 

Alpha Lambda Delta: honor society for outstanding 

sdiolastic adiievement for first-year students 

Alpha Hii Sigma: national honor society for criminal justice 

recognizing scholarship in the justice field 

Beta Gamma Sigma: business management society 

Epsilon Chi OmiaDn; intemational business society seddng 

to enhance educational field and to provide networidng 

opportunities 



Introduction 7 



Phi Beta Kappa (Phi Kappa Phi Chapter): for exceptional 

academic achievement in the Hbcral arts 

Pi Alpha Alpha national honor society for public afi&irs and 

administration (graduate students only) 

Pi Alpha Delta: prelaw honor society open to all 

undergraduates 

Pi Sigma Alpha: national fxiUtical science honor society 

recognizing academic and professional achievement 

Sigma Iota Rha (A^ha Chapter): offering interdisciplinary 

scholarly recognition forstudents inthe fkld of intematiGnal 

relations 
WAMU-FM Radio 

WAMU 88.5 FM is die leading public radio station forNPR 
news and infotmation in the greater Washington, DC. area. It is 
menfcer-supported, professionally-staffed, and licensed to 
American University. Since 1961, WAMU has provided pro- 
granming to a growing audience of more than 57 5,900 hateneis 
in the District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. The sta- 
tion's 24-hour format blends a unique mixture of news, public af- 
fairs talk programming, and traditional American misic. Home 
to a team of award-winning local reporters and acdaimed talk 
radio hosts, WAMLI offeis corrprehaisive coverage of local, na- 
tional, and international eventa Deeply committed to the Wash- 
ington, DC. metro area, WAMU produces regular and ^cial 
programming that reflects the unique environment of the D.C. 
Metro area. The WAMU Community Council, a citizen^ advi- 
sory panel, sponsois forums to find ways that radio can shed 
light on difGcult problems and complicated issues. 

University Campus 

The 76-acre main campus and 8-acre Tenley satellite campus 
are within one mile of each other The Washington College of 
Law is located on Massachusetts Avenue, a half mUe fimi the 
main campus. 

University &ciUties include administrative and academic 
buildings; housing for about 3,900 students; an interdenomina- 
tional religious center; specialized natural science facilities; a 
confuting center open 24 hours a day, plus 1 3 computer labora- 
tories around campus; two electronic auditoriums (one includes 
video conferencing capabilities), numerous classrooms with the 
latest in multimedia presentation capability; radio and TV stu- 
dios; recital halls; and a conprehenave, miltipurpose sports and 
convocation center 

The Harold £ind Sylvia Qreenbeig Theatre, the home of a 
300-seat performance auditorium for Uvb theatre, dance, and 
music, as well as extensive badtstage areas for dressings rooms, 
and scene and costunB shops, is located at 4200 Wisconsin Ave. 
NW, just a short distance from AUs main campus and fiom the 
Tenleytown/AU Mrtro stop. 

The Katzen Arts Center features more than 1 30,000 square 
feet of space, including gallery space to exhibit the university's 
art collections, as well as work by American University 's feculty 
and students; performance space, studio and educational area^ 
and classrooms. 



Residence Halls 

Six residence halls on the main campus accommodate 2,900 
students per year. The Park Bethesda apartrrent building, lo- 
cated two miles from campus, is managed by AU and can house 
585 graduate, law, and upper-class undergraduates. Three resi- 
dence halls on the Tenley Campus provide housing for 450 
Wadiington Semester students, 

University Library 

The Jack I. and Dorothy G Bender Library and Learning Re- 
souroes Center serves as a gateway to a wide array of print re- 
sources and electronic information and offers many services to 
support student and faculty research. It provides access to exten- 
sive electronic infonnation through more than 1 ,700 subscribed 
databases and other electronic resources Print collections in- 
clude more than 1 rrallion volumes, 1 . 1 miUion micro forms, and 
2,750 jouraala Media collections iiKlude 1 1 ,000 films, videos, 
and multimedia, andover36,700 recordings and 1 3,170 inisical 
scores. 

Primary access to the collections is throu^ ALADIN, flie 
web site for ttie Washington Research Library Consortium 
(WTy..C). American University students and feculty may bor- 
row mataials from all ei^t membas ofWTRLC . Additional li- 
brary resources may be accessed via the Ubrary's CD-ROM 
network or through the AU hhrary web site: www. Kbrary.amer- 
ican.edu/ . 

The Ubrary's Spedal Collections houses rare materials, such 
as books, manuscripts, and personal papeis, including the 
Artanas Martin collection of mathematical texts, the Charles 
Nelson Spinks collection of artistic and historical \wiks of Ja- 
pan, the Irwin M. Heine collection of htaary worics, and Chris- 
topher Jdmson collection of William Faulkner books. Other 
significant collections include the John R Hickman collection, 
the Friends of Colombia Archives, the Records of ttie National 
Peace Corps Association, the Records of the National Commis- 
sion on the PubUc Service, and the Records of WforrBO Strike for 
Peace. 

Technology and Computing Resources 

AH students receive an EagJeNet user account, an "amer- 
icaaedu" e-mail address, and a personal web page, if desired 
Computing resources are deliveredviaa fiberoptic networis pro- 
viding over 7,000 connection points, including all residence hall 
rooms. Wireless network access is also availaHe throughout the 
entire canpus. High-caf>acity dedicated Intemef service isavail- 
able to everyone, and generous data storage for academic as- 
signments and e-nBil is provided on state-of-the-art servers 
available 24 hours a day throughout the year, except for occa- 
sional maintenance periods. 

There are 1 9 corrputer laboratories on campus oflfering a va- 
riety of personal computer and Macintosh systems, as well as 
fee-based high-speed laser printing. There are general-purpose 
faciUties available to all students, seme open 24 horns a day dur- 
ing most of the academic year. There are also many specialized 



8 IntiDduction 



labs supporting specific academic discqalines. Use of these labs 
may be restricted to students taking relevant courses or enrolled 
in specific degree programs. Labs are staffed by fuU-time pro- 
fessionals, graduate assistants and student assistants who pro- 
vide snjport for a broad range of software applications. 

The EagleNet network provides students witti access to 
site-Uceosed software and the resources of ALADIN, the uni- 
versity's on-line library catalog. ALADIN is the giteway to the 
Uhrary holdings of Wadiington-area universities that ^hare ac- 
cess to a broad range of electronic research resources. EagleNet 
also enables students to participate in a growing number of 
courses that use the web to enhance ttie classroom experience. 
On-line academic collaboration is provided to the campus using 
software tools such as Bladdx)aid CourseMo and other elec- 
tronic resources. 

The Ifelp Desk answers so ftwarequestionsand provides gen- 
eral corrputer troubleAooting assistance via telephone, web, 
and e-trail. Throughout the year a variety oftraining classes are 
offered to help members of flie academic community use com- 
puting resources. 

Although limited dial-up facilities are available for 
off-canpus use of EagleNet, nonresident students are encour- 
aged to arrange for Internet service through a private Internet 
provider. For those with laptop conputers equipped with Ether- 
net network cards, pubHc EagleNet access ports are available at 
various locations throughout carrpus. Laptop computers and 
other devices equipped for wireless communication using the 
802. 1 lb standard can also be used anywhere on campus. 

All students must agree to ttie temis ofthe university's Policy 
on the Appropriate Use of Information Technology Resources 
uUch is in ttie Policies and Guidelines section of the Student 
Handbook. 

Protection of Research Subjects 

Protection of Human Subjects in Research 

Any research that indudes experimeDting on, interviewing, 
surveying, or observinghuman beings is subject to re view to de- 
tamine wh^er adequate provision has been made for the pro- 
tection of human subjects in accordance with strict federal 
regulations governing human subjects research. Unless deter- 
mined to be exerrpt, all research rmst be re viewed and sppro wd 
by the AU Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Hu- 
man Subjects (IRB) orone of its designees at the unit or depart- 
ment level. 

Researchers should contact their unit deagnee or tile IRB 
through the oomphance administrator in Sponsored Programs at 
202-885-3440 for further inframation and forms well in advance 
ofthe anticipated start date. No research involving human sub- 
jects can begin unless it has been exenpted or approved. 

Protection of Animals in Research 

Any research involving theuseof laboratoiy animals must be 
approved in advance by ALPs Institutional Animal Care and Use 
Committee (lACUC), which is charged with ensuring the proper 



use, care, and hiffnane treatment of anittBls and enforcing rele- 
vant federal regulations. 

Researchers should contact their department chairs or ttie 
lACUC through the compliance administrator in Sponsored 
Programs at 202-885-3440 for fiirther infomiation and fomjs 
well in advance ofthe anticipated start date. No research involv- 
ing animals can begin until it has been approved. 

Athletics and Recreation 

American Ltaiversity encourages physical fitness throughout 
its cornnunity and strives to include in the educational experi- 
ence of all students habits of fitness that integrate a sound mind 
with a sound body. 
Athletics Mission Statement 

The Athletics Dqjartment will excel athletically in the Patriot 
League at the highest levels of adiievement while maintaining 
the academic standards ofthe university and both the letter and 
spirit ofthe Patriot League Charter. In a fiscally and otherwise 
responable manner, the Athletics Department will be a beacon 
of excellence and enthusiasm in the Anerican Univeraty com- 
mmity. 
Sports Center 

The Sports Center complex serves as home to ttie American 
Univeisity athletics program. The university features a nine- 
teen-sport NCAA Division I program which competes in the Pa- 
triot League (Amiy, Buckndl, Cdgate, Holy Cross, Lafayette, 
Lehigh, and Navy). The university offers women's basketball, 
cross country, field hockey, indoor and outdoor track and field, la- 
crosse, soccer, swimming and diviig, tennis, and wUeybaU, and 
men's bafkefttall, cross country, goU indoor and outdoor track and 
fidd, soccer, swirnrring and diving tennis, and wrestling. 

American University students may attend Eagles 
home-ticketed sporting events free of charge by picking up tick- 
ets in advance of flie game. With proper AU identification, stu- 
dents receive two tickets to each event 

Up-to-the-minute information on AUathldics is available at 
the Eagles' ofiicial Web site at www.aueagle&com or by calling 
tte AU Sports Hothne at 202-885-DUNK (x3865). 

Oflier special functions andmajor entertainment events occur 
throughout the year in Bender Arena. Tickets for both on- and 
oflF-cartpus events can be purchased at the Tick^naster outlet 
located in the lobby ofthe arena. For all ticket information, call 
202-885-FANS (x3267). 
Athletics and Recreation Facilities 

American Univo-sitys Sports Center houses Bender Arena, 
Reeves Aquatic Center, the William I Jacobs Fitness Center, and 
Athletics and Retreation Department offices. The center in- 
cludes four fijll-size basketbalLVolleybaU courts, a 25 -yard 
swimming pool, and a warm-up pool. Outdoor facilities include 
the Reeves soccer/lacrosse field, Oreenberg running track. 
Reeves tennis courts, Jacobs intramural field and, two basket- 
ball courts behind the SportsCenter. The William 1 Jacobs recre- 
ational complex, which opened in Fall 2005, inchides an 



htroduction 9 



astroJurf field hockey surface, a softbsill field, stale-of-the-art 
scoreboard, and two outdoor sand volleyball courts. 

The Jacobs Fitness Center is the central campus facility, pro- 
viding a supportive enviruniiKnt for fitness and health for all 
meniiers of the AU community. Located off the lobby of the 
Sports Center, the Fitness Center is a state-of-flie- art fitness area 
with a wide range of cardio equipment, strength machines, and 
wei^ts. In addition, there are smaller fitness oenteis in each of 
the residence hall complexes and atthe Tanley campus. The Fit- 
nessCenter also providesa variety of services for additional fees 
including group exercise classes, yoga, personal training, fitness 
assessments, and locker rentals. The center is staffed witti 
CPR-cerlified jjrofessionals who are dedicated to health and 
wellness, trained in the use of the equipment, and ready to assist 
with an exercise program to achiew personal healtti goals. 

Students with a valid AU ID who have registered for classes 
are eligible to use the Fitness Center. Memberships for ixe Fit- 
ness Center are al so available at discounted fees for &culty, staff, 
andalurmi. 

Hours of operation vary according to the academic calendar 
and schetiiled university events in ftie arena. Specific infornia- 
tion on the hours of operation is available on the web at 
www.american.edu^acob6fitness or by calling the Info Line at 
202-885-6267. 

lotramural and Club Sports 

The Intramural Sports Program is an exciting and fun com- 
plement to a student's academic, cultural, and social education. 
The program offers a wide range of sports including basketball, 
flag football, soccei; Softball, lacquetball, golf^ swinming, vol- 
leyball, and tennis. Different leagues are conducted in these 
sports formen, women, co-recreational groups, and varying skiU 
levels. Involvement in intramirals is a wanderful opportunity 
for students to make new acquaintances, develop friendships 
andenjoythebenefisofexercise and physical activity. An Intra- 
mural Sports Program brochure hsting all the mles and regula- 
tions of ttie program, as well as deadlines for signing up for 
various sports, may be obtained from the Intramural OflHce in 
the Spoits Center lower level. Room G-03, 202-885-3050. 

Chib Sports are student run and o!gani2Bd teams. They com- 
pete against colleges and universities around the country in the 
following areas: ballroom dance, crew, cycUng, fencing, men's 
and women's ice hockey, men's and women's lacrosse, rolls' 
hockey, men's and womrai's nigby, women's soccer, women's 
Softball, and nen's and >M3men's uhimate fiisbee. ftograms re- 
ceive funding fixDmthe Department of Athletics, sipervised by 
the recreational sports oflSce. 

On-Campus Services 

Dining Services and Stores 

The Tetrace Dining Room (TDRX Madcetplace, and Tavem 
are located in Mary Qraydon Center There is also a contract din- 
ing facility on the Tenley Campus. The Eagle 's Nest carries 
food, magazines, newspq>ers, and toilelry items. Other stores 



and services in the Butler Pavihon include a bank, mailbox ser- 
vict/copy center, hair salon, cafe, and fast-food restaurard 

The canpus bookstore, located on the second and third floors 
of the Butler Pavilion, carries all required textbooks, a large se- 
lection ofother books, all necessary supphes, stationery, Ameri- 
can University sportswear, and other iterrn. 
Child Development Center 

AnKtican Ltoiveisity's Child Development Center, located 
on campus, is a licensed and NAECP -accredited preschool for 
children 2>^ to 5 years old. Highly-qualified teachers, supported 
by trained woik-study students, provide a dev^lopmentally ap- 
propriate program of active leaning in the areas of physical, so- 
cial, emotional, and intellectual development. Children of 
students, faculty, and staff may be enrolled in this stimulating 
and nurturing fiill-day program In addition, the center offers 
students fiom many disdplines a {dace to intern and observe, 
create, and test theories involving diildr«n. 
For more informaticn on the Qifld Development Center 
phone: 202-885-3330 e-mail: vgreen@american.edu 
Parking and Traflic 

Parking at American Lhiveisity is by permit or meter only, 
8 :00 a.m. to 5O0 p.in., Nfonday through Friday. Designated re- 
stricted lots and the Tenley Canpus lots are enforced 24 hours a 
day, sevai days a week. Visitors may purchase a guest pemit 
fix)mthe Tran^Mrtation Services office. 

All faculty, stafi^ and students must register their vehicles in 
the Transportation Services office by the end of the first day of 
classes of each semester. Vehicles brought to the univeisity dur- 
ing the semester must be registered immediately. Students may 
not register a vehicle that is not registered in their family name. 
Fredimen and Washington Semesta- students are not pennitted 
to have vehicles on campus or to paik in Advisory Neighbor- 
hood Commissions 3D and 3E. 

Special access paiking spaces are available around campus. 
Vehicles pariied in &ese spaces must di^lay vaUd handicap or 
disabiUty Ucense plates or pemiits Tenporary AU disabiUty 
permits iiBy be obtained fkan the Transportation Services of- 
fice. A physician's certification is required. 

For more information call 202-885-3110. 

Shuttle Services 

American Liiiveisity encourages the use of fee \\4ishington, 
DC. subway and bus system, Metrorail and Metrobus. A free 
shuttle service for students, faculty, staff, and visitors is available 
to and finm the Tenleytown/AU Metrorail station, Tenley Cam- 
pus,ParkBethesda,andthe Washington College ofLaw. Access 
for persons with disabihties is available. A valid AU ID card or 
Shuttle Guest Pass is required for all hders. Hours of operation 
areMondaythrougJi Thursday, 7:00a.m. to 1230 am.; Friday 
7:00 am to 2:30 am, Sahnday, 8:00 am. to 2:30 am; and 
Sunday, 8:00 am. to 1 :00 am 

For a shuttle schedule or more infotmation, call 202-885-3302 
or go to: www.americanedu/finanoe/dps^shuttle . 



10 Introducdon 



Accreditation 

American University is accredited by the Middle States 
CcamnissiononlfigherEducationof the Middle States Assoda- 
tioD of Co lieges and Schools, 3624 Maiket Street, Philadelphia, 
PA 19104, 267-284-5000. The Middle States Commission on 
Higher Education is an institutional accrediting agency recog- 
nized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for 
Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). Amsrican University 
is recognized as church-related by the University Senate of the 
United Methodist Church. A nuntier of programs are individu- 
ally accredited by, or are members oi, professional organiza- 
tions: 

• The Department of Chemistry at American University is 
accredited by the American Chonical Society (ACS), a 
specialized accrediting agency recognized by U.S. 
Etepartment of Education. 

• The School of Education, Teaching, and Health at 
American Utdversity isaccreditedby theNationalCouncil 
for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), a 
specialized accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. 
Department of Education and the Council for Hi^er 
Education Accreditation. The School of Education, 
Teaching and Health, is also actredited by the National 
Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and 
Certification (NASDTEC), a specialized accrediting 
agency recognized by the Coundl for Higher Education 
Accreditation (both elementary and secondary). 

• The music progiamof the Departnnent of Performing Arts 
at American University is an accredited institutional 
member of the National Association ofSchcxjls ofMusic, a 
specialized accrediting agency recognized by 4ie U.S. 
Department of Education and ttie Council for Higher 
Education Accreditation. 

• Since 1972, the doctoral programinclinicalpsychDlogyof 
the Department ofPsychology at American Lhiversity has 
been accredited by the American Psychological 
Association, a specialized accrediting agency recognized 



by the U.S. Department of Education and the Council few- 
Higher Education Accreditation. 

• The Sctool of Communication at American University is 
accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in 
Journalism and Mass Communication, a speciali2)ed 
accrediting agency recognized by the Council for Hi^er 
Education Accreditation. 

• The Kogod School of Business at American University is 
accredited by AACSB Intematicnal, the Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, a specialized 
accrediting agency recognized by the Council for Hi^er 
Education Accreditation. 

• The School of International Service at American 
University is a member of the Association of Professional 
Schools of International Relations. 

• The ScfacK)l of Public Affairs at American University is 
accredited by the Commission on Peer Review and 
Accreditation of flie National Association of Schools of 
Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA), a 
specialized accrediting agency recognized by the Council 
for Hi^er Education Accreditation, and authorized to 
accredit master/masters degrees in pubhc affairs and 
adminish-ation. American Ltoiversity's School of PuHic 
Affairs is a member of the Association for Public Policy 
Analysis and Management (APPAM) and the Academy of 
Criminal Justice Sciences. 

• The Washington College of Law at American University is 
approved by the American Bar Association (ABA) 
through ABA's Section of Legal Education and 
Admisaons to the Bar, a specialized accrediting agency 
recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. 
American Univeisity's WaAinglon College of Law is a 
membwofthe Association of AmericanLawSchools. The 
law school also meets the requirements for preparation for 
the bar in all states and carries the certification for the 
United States District Court for the District of Columbia 
and the New Yoric State Department of Educatioa 



Introduction 11 



Fall 2005 Enrollment 

Full-time undsTgraduates 5,550 

Part-time undergraduates 232 

FuU-timeand part-time graduate students 
(induding Washington College of Law) 5,060 

Nondegree, certificate, and Washington Semester students 1,163 

Total 12,005 



College of Arts and Sciences 
Kogod School of Business 
School of Communication 
School of International Service 
School of Public Affaiis 
Washington College ofLaw 



Degrees Conferred 2004-2005 



Bachelor's Masters Doctorate J.D. LLM. 



383 


325 


61 


252 


207 




236 


149 




284 


316 


2 


264 


230 


10 




553 



122 



Total 
769 
459 
385 
602 
504 
675 



University Total 



1,419 



1,227 



73 



553 



122 



3,394 



In 3004 2005, the graduation rate for undergtaduate students who entered American University as fiill-time fieshmen in 
fall 2000 was 68.8 percent 



12 Introduction 

Undergraduate Programs 
Majors 

American Studies (B.A.) 

Anfliropology (B.A.) 

Art History (B.A.) 

Audio Production (R A.) 

Audio Technotogy (B.S.) 

Biochemistry (B.S.) 

Biology (B.S.) 

Business Administration (aS.B.A.) 

Chemistry (B.S.) 

Communication: Communication Studies (B.A) 

Communication: Journalism (B.A) 

Communication: Pubhc Communication (B.A) 

Communication: Visual Media (RA.) 

Computer Science (B.S.) 

Economics (BA, B.S.) 

Elementary Education (B.A) 

Environmental Studies (B.A) 

Fine Arts (B.FA.) 

Foreign Language and Communication Media (B.A) 

French Studies (B.A) 

German Studies (B.A) 

Graphic Design (RA) 

Health Promotion (RS.) 

History (B.A.) 

Interdisciplinary Studies (RA., B.S.) 

Interdisciplinary Studies: Communication, Legal 

Institutions, Economics, and Govemment (B.A) 
International Studies (B.A) 
Jewish Studies (B.A) 
Justice (R A) 

Language and Area Studies: 
French/Europe (B.A) 
GermaiVEurope (B.A) 
Russian/Area Studies (B.A) 
Spanish/Latin America (B.A.) 

Law and Society (B.A) 

Liberal Studies (R.A) 

Literature (B.A) 

Marine Science (B.S.) 

Mathematics (B. S . ) 

Mathematics, Applied (B.S.) 

Multimedia Design and Development (RS.) 

Music (BA.) 

Performing Arts: Music Theater (B. A) 

Performing Arts: Theater (B.A.) 

Philosophy (BA.) 

Physics (B.S.) 

Political Science (B.A) 

Psychology (RA.) 

Russian Studies (B.A) 

Secondary Education (second major only) 

Sociology (B.A) 

Spanish Studies (B.A) 

Statistics (B.S.) 

Studio Art (B.A) 

Women's and Gender Studies (BA.) 

Minors 

American Studies 
Anthropology 



Anthropology, Apphed 

Arab Studies 

Art History 

Audio Technology 

Biochemistry 

Biology 

Business Administration 

Chemistry 

Corrmrunication 

Computer Science 

Dance 

Economics 

Education Studies 

Environmental Science 

Finance 

French Langut^e 

German Language 

Graphic Design 

Healfli Promotion 

History 

InforTTBtion Systems and Technology 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

International Studies 

Israeli Studies 

JaparKse Language 

Jewish Studies 

Justice 

Language and Area Studies: 
French/Europe 
German/Europe 
Japanese/Asia 
Russian/Area Studies 
Spanish/Latin America 

Literature 

Literature: Cinema Studies 

Marketing 

Mathematics 

Multi-Elhnic Studies 

Music 

North American Studies 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Physics, Applied 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Public Administration and Policy 

Quantitative Methods 

Real Estate 

Rehgion 

Russian Language 

Russian Studies 

Sociology 

Spanish Language 

Special Education 

Statistics 

Studio Art 

Theater 

Women's and Gender Studies 

Undergraduate Certificates 

Advanced Leadership Studies (SPA students) 
Arab Studies 
Asian Studies 
European Studies 



Introductian 13 



Intematiunal Affiiirs 

Multi-Hthnic Studies 

Public Anthropology 

Statistics, Applied 

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) 

Translation: French, German, Russian, or Spatush 

Women, Policy, and Political l^eadership 

Graduate Programs 

Doctoral 

Anthropology (PhD.) 

Economics (Ph.D.) 

History (PhD.) 

International Relations (Ph.D.) 

Juridical Science (S.J.D.) 

Justice, Law and Society (Ph.D.) 

Political Science (Ph.D.) 

Psychology (PKD.) 

Public Administration (Ph.D.) 

Master's 

Accounting (M.S.) 

Applied Science (MS.) 

Art History (MA.) 

Biology (M. A, M.S.) 

Business Administiation (M.B.A.) 

Chemistry (M.S.) 

Corrmunication: JoumaUsm and Public Affairs (M. A.) 

Conmunication: Producing for Film and Video (M. A) 

Communication; Pubbc Communication (MA.) 

Computer Science (M.S.) 

Creative Writing (ME A.) 

Curriculum and Instruction (M.Ed) 

Development Management (M.S.) 

Economics (M. A) 

EnvironiTBntal Science (M.S.) 

Ethics, Peace, and Global Afeirs (M.A.) 

Film and Electronic Media (M.F.A) 

Film and Video (MA.) 

Global Environmental PoHcy (M.A) 

HeaMi Promotion Management (M.S.) 

History (MA.) 

Information Technology Management (M.S.) 

International Affairs (M A. ) 

tracks- 
Comparative and Regional Studies 
In lemational Econom ic Po licy 
International Politics 

Natural Resources and Sustainable Development 
United Stales Foreign Policy 

International Communication (M.A) 

International Development (M.A.) 

International Legal Studies (LL.M.) 

International Peace and Conflict Resolution (M.A) 

International Service (M.I.S.) 

International Training and Education (M.A) 

Justice, Law and Society (M.S.) 

Uw(J.D.) 

Law and Government (LL.M.) 

Literature (MA.) 



Management ( MS.) 

Mathematics (M.A) 

Organization Development (MS O.D.) 

Performing Arts: Arts Management (M.A.) 

Philosophy (M.A.) 

Political Science (M.A.) 

Psychology (M.A) 

Public Administration (MP.A.) 

Public Anthropology (M.A.) 

Public PoHcy (M.P.P.) 

Sociology (MA.) 

Spani^: Latin American Studies (M.A) 

Special Education: Leanring I>isabilities(M.A.) 

Statistics (M.S.) 

Studio Art (M.F. A) 

Taxation (M.S.) 

Teaching (MA.T.) 

tracks: 

Elementary Education 

Secondary Education 

English for Speakers of Other Languages 

International Training and Development 
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (M. A) 

Graduate CertiHcates 

Arts Management 

Asian Studies 

Computer Science 

Cross-Cultural Communication 

Bivironmental Assessment 

Euiropean Studies 

International Development Management 

International Economic RelatiorG 

Microeconomics, Applied 

North American Studies 

Organization Devetopment, Fundamentals and Advanced 

Organizational Change 

Peacebuilding 

Postbaccalaureate Premedical 

Professional Development: 

Comparative and Regional Studies 

GIoImI Environmental PoHcy 

International Communication 

International Development 

International Economic Policy 

International Peace and Conflict Resolution 

International Politics 

United States Foreign Policy 
Public Anthropology 
Public Fiiumcial Management 
Public Management 
Public PoHcy Analysis 
Social Research 
Statistics, Applied 
Teaching: Elementary 

Teaching: English for Speakers of Other Languages 
Teaching: Secondary 

Teaching English to Speakers of Otfier Languages (TESOL) 
The Americas 

Translation: French, Russian, or Spanish 
Women, Policy, and Political Leadership 



Admission Requirements 

• Freshman and Transfer Students 

• Graduate Students 

• Nondegree Students 

• International Students 



Undergraduate Study 

To request application forms or for more infoimation: 
phone: 202-885-6000 e-mail: admissions@amBrican.edu 
Apfiicants may use fee paper or online vasion of the Conmon 
Application, the AUpapo" ap^cation, or AU online application 
at: http://admissions.american.edu 

Applicants are responsible for requesthg that leteres of rec- 
ommendation and official transcripts and test scores be sent di- 
rectly to the Admissions OflSce. American University's SAF 
and TOEFL code is 5007, and fee ACT code is 0648. 

International applicants should refer to the international stu- 
dent guide Encounter the World for additional instructions. 
American University requires all applicants whose first lan- 
guage is not EngUdi, regardless of citizenship, to demonstrate 
F.nglish-bnguage proficiency. For more information, see Eng- 
lish Language Requirements 

Freshman Admission Requirements 

To be considered for admissbn, qjpbcants Aould 

• Have graduated from a secondary school with at least 1 6 
acadonic units, including at least fourunitsin English, three 
units in college preparatory mathematics (induding the 
equivalent of two units in algebra and one unit o f geometry), 
two units in foreign language(s), two units in lab science, 
and two units in social sciences. 

Applicants who hold General Education EHplomas (GEE^) 
may be admitted on the basis of satisfactory p«formance on 
SAX ACT, and other such tests and transcripts. 

• Ha ve a minimiim academic average of above C. 

• Submit the results of either the SAT Reasoning test or the 
ACT with writing. 

Also recommended are the SAF Subject Mathonatics Level 
n test (a score of 650 in Math II will fiilfiU ttie University 
Mathematics Requirement) and Foreign Language SAT 
Subject test forapplicantswhoplan to continue the study ofa 
fordgn language b^un in secondary school. 



Transfer Admission Requirements 

Students who wish to be considCTed for transfer admission 
must be in good academic and social standing at the school pre- 
viously attended. All apf>licants wifli a cumulative grade poiiS 
average of at least 2.00 on a 4.00 scale from all schools attended 
(at AG-rated regionally accredited institutions) wiH be consid- 
ered. However, to be considered corrpetitive for admission, ap- 
plicants need a minimum grade point avaage of 230. 

Apphcants to individual schools should have maintained a 
cumilatiw minimum grade point average (on a 4.00 scale) fiom 
all schools attaided as follows: 

Kogod School of Business 2.50 

School of Communication 2.50 

School of International Service 3.00 

School of Education, Teaching, and Health (CoUege of 
Alts and Sciaices) 2.70 

School of PubUcAfiaic 2.50 

TransfCT applicants must request each collegiate institution 
previously attended to send an official transcript of all woik 
conpleted directly to the Admissions Ofiice. Attendance at all 
institutions must be rejxnted whether or not credit was earned 
and whether or not transfer credit is desired. Failure to rejxjrt all 
previous academic work will be considered sufiBcient cause for 
rejection of an application or for dianissal fixxn the university 
TiansfCT applicants with fewer ftian 24 credit hours com- 
pleted at the time of application should also submit the second- 
ary school record and standardized test scores. 
Deadlines for Admissions Applications 

VS. Freshman Admissions Application Deadlines 

• Fall Semester Early Decision; November 1 5 

• Fall SenBster Regular Decision: January 1 5 

• Spring Semester: December 1 

• Suirmer Semester. Apml 1 

UJS. Transfer Student Admission Applicatbn Deadlnes 

• Fall Semester March 1 to be considered for 

scholarship)s/financial aid 

• Fall SertBSter July 1 

• Spring Semester: Noverrber 1 

• Sumner Semester April 1 



16 Admission Requiiements 



International Freshman Admission Application Deadlines 

• Fall Semester Eariy Decision Freshmen: November 15 

• Fall Semester Regular Decision: January 1 5 

• Spring Semester September 1 

International Transfer Admission Application Deadlines 

• Fall Semester May 1 

• Spring Semester Septanber 1 

Due to visa regulations, international students may have restric- 
ticns on applying for admission for the summer term. For more 
information, contact International Student & Sdiolar Services 
(ISSS) at 202-885-3350. 
University Honors Program Admission 

Incoming fieshmen are admitted by invitation to the Univer- 
sity Honors Program, fliere is no sepaiate appUcation to apply. 
The top applicants for admission to the university will be conad- 
ered for the program and will be notified of this decision along 
with their admission letter. Admission to the program is hi^y 
competitive, with consideration of the student's grade point av- 
erage, ftie strength of ttie high school academic program, and 
standardized test scores as the most important factors in the se- 
lection process. Freshman and sophomores who were not in- 
vited as fredunan but who demonstrate academic excellence, 
such asa cumulative grade point average of 3.60 or higher, rigor- 
ous course work, innovative research, etc., may nominate them- 
selves for admission to the program after completing two fiJl 
tirrE academic serrBSters at American University. To begin the 
nomination process, students should contact the Univeraty 
Honors Center at honors@americaaedu. 
Notice of Admission 

General admission fieshman appUcants w^iose applications 
and supporting documents have been received by the Admis- 
sions OfBce by February 1 are notified of the dedsion on their 
applications by April 1. 

Early decision apphcants are notified of the decision by De- 
cember 3 1 ; at that time early decision spphcants may be admit- 
ted, denied admission, or deferred until the general admission 
date of April 1 . 

Transfer apphcantsare notified of decisions as they are made. 

Full-time undergraduates are required to pay a nonrefimdable 
tuition deposit to reserve a place in the class. 

Comfiete detailed instructions for replying to the admissian 
offer are provided with the rxitice of acceptance. 
Early Admission 

American University offers the opportunity for admission a 
year earUer than normal to fieshman spphcants whose ability, 
academic adiievement, and general maturity indicate &at they 
are ready to begin collegiate work 

Applicants are considered on their own merit. However, the 
major &ctors important to evaluation are: 

• the secondary school record, with special reference to 
grades achieved and the pattern of courses taken; 

• performance on the Scholastic Assessment Test I (SAT f) or 
the American College Test (ACT); 



• the recommendation of file secondary school principal or 
coureelorandtwo teacher recommendations; 

• a letter fiom the applicant stating tfie reasons for seeking 
early admission; and 

• posably, an interview with a screening committee. 
Early Decision 

Freshman ^pUcants whose first choice is American Ltaivw- 
sity are encouraged to apply as early decision candidates. Stu- 
dents admitted under the early decision plan leam of their 
admission by December 31 and receive first consideration for 
scfaolaiships, financial aid, housing, and registration. The uni- 
versity, in turn, is assured that these students will enroUif admit- 
ted. 

The deadline forapplying for early decision is November 15, 
at which time all documents, including the $45 application fee, 
rtijst be on fUe with the AdmissionsOflSce. Early decision appli- 
cants may initiate applications to other schools before notifica- 
tion, but if they are admitted to American University as early 
decision candidates, they must sid>mit a tuition jrepayment by 
February 1 and withdraw all ^qipUcations to oihet colleges and 
urriversities. 

Early decision applicants are evaluatedby the sans criteria as 
all other fre^iman applicants. They may be admitted to the uni- 
va^ty in December, denied admission, or have their application 
deferred until the general admission reply date of April 1 . Stu- 
dents deferred until April are released fiom the CMnmitment to 
attend if admitted. 

Learning Services Program 

American Univa^tyofFersa structured program for entering 
fieshmen wit learning disabilities who are seeking additional 
support Students interested in the Learning Services Program 
mist identify therrBelves in the regular admissions process and 
submit a supplementary apjiication to the program at the time 
they apply to the university Further inforrrBtion is available 
from the Academic Support Center at 202-885-3360 or 
a8c@american.edu . 
Admission from Nondegree Status 

Students wishing to transfer firomnondegree status at Ameri- 
can University to under^graduate degree status must submit a for- 
mal application for admission to the Admissions OflSoe. If a 
student is accepted into an undergraduate degree program, a 
maximum of 30 credit hours may be transfened firm ncndegree 
status to the degree program 
Admission for Part-time Study 

An undergraduate student enrolled in fewer than 1 2 credit 
hours is considered a part-time student Part-time degree appU- 
cants are required to meet the same standards for admission as 
fiiU-time frediman or transfer apjAicants. 

Applicants considering part-time study in a degree program 
are cautioned that they rray be unable to conplete the necessary 
course work for some degree programs by attending evening 
classes only. Before applying they should consult with the de- 



Admission Requnenents 17 



partment of their proposed major to ascertain whether the re- 

quiicd cwurses will be available to ttiem. 

Readmission 

An undergraduate student whose studies at the university are 
interrupted for any reason for a period of one semester (exclud- 
ing the summer sessions) must submit a formal application for 
readmission and a reappKcation fee to the Admissions Office at 
least two months before the beginning of the semester or sum- 
mer session for which the student wishes to be readmitted, un- 
less written permission to study at anotha" collegiate institution 
was secured in advance or the student has been granted an offi- 
cial leave of absence. 

Students who were in good standing when 4iey left the uni- 
versity and who have maintained a satisfactory grade f>oinl aver- 
age at another school are virtually assured readmission. It is to a 
student'sadvantageto apply for readmission as early as possible 
so that heor she may register during the advance registration pe- 
riod. 

A student who is readmitted is subject to ttie academic re- 
quiiements and regulations in effect at the time of readmission. 

Graduate Study 

Application for graduate study is made directly to the school 
or department offering the degree program and is self-managed. 
As graduate programs arc highly individualized, applicants arc 
encouraged to schedule an appointment with an academic advi- 
sor in the appropriate department. 

Apphcants are responsible for requesting that official tran- 
scripts and test scores be sent diredly trom the issuing institu- 
tiors to the appropriate graduate admissions office. Attendance 
at dl institutions must be reported whether or not crecBt was 
earned. Failure to report all previous academic work (under- 
graduate and graduate) will be considered sufficient cause (brre- 
jection of an application or for dismissal from the university. 

International applicants should refer to International Student 
Information for additional instructions. American University re- 
quircs all applicants whose first language is not En^sh, rcgard- 
less of citizenship, to demonstrate English-language 
proficiency. For more infoim^on, see Engli^ Language Re- 
quirements 
Admission Requirements 

The mirumum university admission requirements for gradu- 
ate study are outlined bebw. Please referto the appropriate col- 
lege, school, and department program requirements for 
additional requirements. 

• A bachelor's degree eamed at an accredited college or 
university. 

• At least a 3.00 cumulative grade poiid average (on a 4.00 
scale) in the undergraduate prog-am, calculated on the last 
60 credit hours of course work completed. 

• Acuniilativegradepointaverageofatleast3.00(ona4.00 
I scale) in all relevant graduate work for which a grade has 
I been awarded. 



An applicant for graduate study rrBy be admitted without ref- 
erence to the undergraduate awrage if the applicant has main- 
tained eiflier a 3.30 (on a 4.00 scale) cumulative grade point 
average in a master 's degree programcorrpleted at an accredited 
institution, or a 3.50 (on a4.00 scale) cuinilative grade point av- 
erage in the last 1 2 credit hours of a master's or doctoral degree 
program still in progress at such an institution Et the time the ap- 
plication is evaluated, or in graduate work taken in nondegree 
status at American University and applicable to the degree pro- 
gram which is being applied for. 

An appiicanl for graduate study may be admitted without a 
bachelor's degree eamed at an accredited college or university 
or without reference to the undergraduate average provided that 
he or she is a midcareer person from govemirrent or the private 
sector who has not attended school full-time for at least eight 
years and is applying for adnission to a professior»l master's 
degree program This exception must be justified by an evalua- 
tion of the applicant's work performance and his or her organiza- 
tion's recommendation. 
Provisional Standing 

Each college, school, ordep>artment of ttie university may ad- 
mit to provisional standing a limitednuirber of students who do 
not meet the minimum standards of eitha- the university or the 
teaching unit. By the end of one fiiU semester of full-time study 
or after the first 9 to 1 2 oedit hours of part-time study, flie stu- 
dent will be evaluated by the college, school, or department. 
Continuation in the graduate program will be permitted on fa- 
vorable appraisal of the student's performance. 

The provisional admisaon status of a graduate student who 
does not give satisfectory evidence of capability will be with- 
drawn. This constitutes dismissal of the student. 
Admission from Nondegree Status 

Students willing to transfer fitim nondegree status at Ameri- 
can University to graduate degree status must subrtrit a formal 
appUcaticD fbradmissioii If a student is accepted into a graduate 
degree program, up to 12 credit hours of graduate-level course 
work completed in nondegree status may be apphed to a gradu- 
ate degree program, or vip to 21 credit hours eamed in a com- 
pleted graduate certificate program. 
Readmission 

After expiration of the time limit for cotrpletion of a graduate 
degree program, readmission may be granted once for a period 
of tiiree >ears (less any time given in previous extensions of can- 
didacy), subject to the requirements of the particular degree in 
effect at &e time of readmissioa, and may involve taking addi- 
tiorral courses or other woric or both. When a studerd is readmit- 
ted under these circumstances, the length of titTE that the student 
wiU be given to complete degree requirements and any addi- 
tional courses, examinations, or other requirements which are 
deemed necessary by the teaching unit will be ^lecified. Stu- 
dents applying for graduate readmission must pay a fee. 



18 Admission Requiiemenls 



Nondegree Study 

Astudent wiio does not wi^ orisnotieadyto pmsue adegree 
program but desiies to take credit courees may be qualified to 
enroll as a nondegree student. Nondegtee students may register 
for any university course for which theyhave the necessary aca- 
demic background and qualifications. Many students begin their 
studies in nondegree status and apply the credit they have earned 
towarda degree program in one of the schools or colleges ofthe 
university. Nondegree students begin registration with the 
nondegree advisor in the appropriate school or college. 

Undeigraduate-level courses are open to high sdiool gradu- 
ates, students in good landing at other accredited colleges and 
universities; students with an undergraduate degree; and 
hi^-sdiool students who have a B avwage and the recommen- 
dation of their hi^ school counselor or principaL 

Graduate-level courses are open to students who haw com- 
pleted a bachelor's degree. 

The following students ordinarily may not register in 
ncndegree status: 

• Students currently enrolled as undergraduate or graduate 
degree students in any of the member institutions of the 
Consortium ofUniversities ofthe Washington Metropolitan 
Area 

• American University students who have not completed 
their degree programs 

• Students who have been dismissed from American 
University or another college or university within the 
previous twelve months 

International Student Admission 

The following regutatioiis apply to all students who are 
not citEsens or '^rmanent residents" of the United States of 
America. 

All international students applying for admissian must sub- 
nit the appropriate documents well in advance to undergraduate 
adnissions or to flie graduate ofiBce ofthe school or college to 
which they are applying. Photocopied or faxed documents are 
not accepted for evaluation purposes. Transcripts for interna- 
tional £f)phcants mist be submitted forall secondary schoolsat- 
tended. Documents must be in the language of instructicai ofthe 
issuing school and must be accompanied by an ofiBcial Enghsh 
translation. 
Visa Requirements 

Studoits in nonimmigrant F-1 or J-1 static are required by 
VS. hnnigration and Natmalizalion Service (TNS) regulations 
to enroU for and maintain a fiill-time course load during the fall 
and spring semesters. If the student's first teim is a surrmer ses- 
sion, the fiill-time course load requirement will apply for ttiat 
sunmer. It is ttie individual student's re^xmsibility to comply 
with INS regulations. 



To meet the INS full -time course load requirements at Ameri- 
can University each semester, undergraduate students are re- 
quired to register for a minimum of 12 credit hours, graduate 
students for aminirmimof 9 credit hours, and law students in the 
master's program for a mininiimof 8 onedit hours Anychange 
in registration which results in a course load below these mini- 
mim requirements must be authorized by International Student 
& Schdar Swvices (ISSS) in consultation with the student 'sac- 
ademic advisor. 

Students in F-1 or J-1 status who fail to rreet these require- 
ments are considered by INSto be"out-of-status"andtose their 
eligibility forall immigration benefits including on-campusan- 
pbyment and practical training and are subject to defxirtatian. 

All students in F-1 oDnimmigrant status are required to at- 
tend, initially, the educational instiution which issued the Certif- 
icate ofTiUgibility (1-20) used to obtain the F-1 status. 

Students in F-1 or J-1 status are reminded that a diange of 
school fiiom one U.S. educational institution to ano&er or a 
change of program within the sane educational institution mist 
be made according to INS regulations. At American University 
such changes are pncessed through International Student & 
Scholar Services (ISSS), Butler Pavihon 410. 

Students in Exchange Visitor (J-1) status requesting a transfer 
to American University should consult with ISSS before regis- 
tering for classes. Transfer from one exdiange visitor jwogramto 
another requires a release fiom the previous program sponsor 
and/orihe approval ofthe INS. It isadvisable that all studentsen- 
tering the university in J-1 status at the time of admission consult 
with ISSS before registering for classes. 

Questions concerning INS regulations should be directed to 
hiemational Student & Sdclar Services (ISSS), Butler Pavil- 
ion 410; telephone 202-885-3350; fax 202-885-3354. Regular 
office hours are Monday through Friday, 9: 00 a.m. to 5 : 00 p jn 

English Language Requirements 

American University generally requires all students whose 
first language is not Engli^ regardless of citizenship, to take 
OIK ofthe following exams and achieve the indicated scores to 
demonstrate English-language proficiency: 

• TOEFL (Test of Enghsh as a Foreign Language): score 550 
or higher on the paper-based test or 213 or higher on the 
conputer-based test or 80 or higher on ttie Iitemet-based 
test 

• SAT I: Reasoning Test (Verbal): score 530 or trigha" 

• SAT II: Subject Test-English Language Proficiency Test 
(ELPT): score 970 or hi^er 

• International Engli^ Language Testing System (lELTS) 
score 6.5 or hi^er 

Examination results ^ould be sait directly to the university. 
American University's SAT and TOEFL code is 5007. 



Tuition, Expenses, and 
Financial Aid 

• Tuition, Housing and Dining, and Fees 

• Undergraduate Financial Aid 

• Graduate Financial Aid 

• Veteran's Benefits 



Undei^graduate students who register for 12 to 17 credit hours 
are assessed tuition at the fiiU-lime rate. Undergraduate students 
who register tor fewer than 12 credit hours are assessed tuition 
based on flie number of credit houis taken. Undergraduate stu- 
dents who register for more than 1 7 credit hours are charged the 
fiiU-time tuition rate wifli an additional charge for each credit 
hour over 17. 

Graduate and nondegree students are assessed tuition per 
credit hour. 

\A4ishington College ofLaw (WCL) studentsare assessed tui- 
tion on the same basis as undeigraduates students. However, the 
WCL tuition rate diifers from that of the rest of the university. 

The off-campus tuition rate differs from the rate for 
on-campus courses. Full-time undergraduate students, howeva; 
who register for courses both on andoffcampus are assessed tui- 
tion at the on-campus full-time rate. 

Given 4ie probable cortinuation of cunenl economic condi- 
tions, as vkU as the need to continue to accderate the acaderric de- 
velopmeit of the university, it is reasonable to expect that tuition 
and fee increases will be lequiied eadi year in tiie near fiiture. 



Tuition 

Undergraduate Students 

Full-tin* (12-17 credit houre) $14,603 

(Above 1 7 hours, $973 per additional credit hour) 

Part-time (per credit hour) 973 

Graduate Students 

Full- and part-time: (per credit hour) 1048 

MBARxjgram 

12 or more credit hours (per semester) .... $13,702 

Fewer flian 12 credit hours (per credit hour) . . . 1048 

Law Students 

Full-tiiTB (12-17 credit hours) $17,200 

(Above 1 7 hours, $ 1 ,274 per additional oedil hour) 
Part-time (per credit hour) 1,274 

Nondegree Students 

Course level 100-400 (per credit hour) $973 

Course level 500 and above (per credit hour) . . . 1048 

OfT-Campus Programs 

(per credit hour) 882 

Note: Auditors pay flie same charges as students enrolled for 
credit and are subject to all appUcaUe special fees. 



Non-AU Study Abroad Fee 

For all American University studaits participating in 
non-AU study abroad programs via a Ftermit to Study 
Abroad 

Fall or spring (per semester) $2,000 

Summa' 1,000 



20 Tuitioii,E?q>enses,and Financial Aid 



Housing 

On Campus 

Residence charges are for each semester 

Residence Hall Asscxiation Fee $14.00 

Main campus and Tenley campus: Anderson, 
Hughes, Leonard, Letts, and McDowell Halls; 
Congressional, Capital, and Federal Halls 

Single Occupancy $4,609 

Single Occupancy witti batti (Tenley) 5,384 

Double Occupancy 3,675 

Triple Occujancy 2,685 

Centennial Hall 

Single Occupancy 5,384 

Double Occupancy 3,675 

OfT-Campus 
Park Bethesda 
AJl prices are per student per space. 

Studio, 1 Occupant (per month) $1,600 

1 Bedroom, 1 Occupant (per month) 1,655 

1 Bedroom, 2 Oocupaits (per month) 1,045 

2 Bedroom, 2 Occupants (per month) 1 ,540 

2 Bedroom, 3 Occupants, Single Room (per month) 1,310 
2 Bedroom, 3 Occupants, Double Room (per month)! ,035 

2 Bedroom, 4 Occupants (per nBnth) 1,010 

Loft, 4 Occupants (per n»nth) 1,160 

For more information contact Housing and Dining Programs at 
202-885-3370 or go to: www.american.edu/ocl/housing 

Meal Plan 

Meal plan charges are by contract per semester 

Super Plan; Unlimited access to TDR $2,125 

200 Block: 200 TDR meals, $300 in EagleBuck$ 2,1 10 
150 Block: 1 50 TDR meals, $300 in EagleBuckS 1 ,945 
100 Block 1 00 TDR meals, $300 in EagleBuck$ 1 ,450 
75 Block 75 TDR meals, $300 in EagleBuckS. . 1,225 
On canpus fieshmen, sophomores, and transfer students are 
required to participate in a meal plan their first two years. 
Students are required to be in at least the "1 50 Block Plan." 
Those fieshmen, sophomores, and transfer students that do 
not sign up for one of the three available meal jians (150 
Block, 200 Block, or Super Plan) by August 15 will 
automatically be enroUed in the 1 50 Block meal plan. 
Students residing off campus, including Washington 
Semester students, may select fiom any of the five meal 
plans. Washington Semester students wiU autonBtically be 
assigned to flie 150 Block meal plan and will then have the 
option to move to any other meal plan. 
Students have the first 15 days of each semester to make 
changes to their meal plan. Meal plan changes will not be 
made after that time. All meal plan changes have to be made 
at Housing and Dining Programs, Anderson Hall 

For more information contact Housing and Dining Programs at 
202-885-3370 or go to: www.anKrican.edu/ocl/hotising 



Fees 

Note: The following fees are not included in tuition rates 
and are nonrefundable. 

Additional course and laboratory fees are also nonreftmdaUe 
and are listed in the Schedule of Classes at. 
http: //american. edu/american/registrar/schedule .html 

Registration 

Late Registration (effective the first day of the tem^ 

(per semester) $50 

Sports Center Fee (mandatory for all students) 

Full-time (per semester) 65 

Part-time (per semester) 30 

Technology Fee (mandatory for all students) 

Full-time (per semester) 95 

I^rt-time (per semester) 30 

Faculty/Staff Registration 

For employees of tile university or thar spouses or 

domestic partners registering imder the tuition remission 

benefit, (per semester) 50 

Alumni Audit n^gmm Registration 

(per semester) 100 

Student Accounts 

American Installment Plan (AIF) 

ProgramFee (per year) $60 

Late fee for Installment Plan payments (per month) . 40 
All other late student account paymeiJs: 

Based on account balaiKe, see Late Piyment and 

Financial Restrictions 

Registration reinstatement 100 

Returned check 25 

(for all personal check and e-check oocurances not bonared 
by the bank) 
Health Insurance 

(per year) $1,250 

For spring/summer (1/1 /07-8/2(y07) 845 

For summer only (5/15/07-8/20/07) 385 

Parking (per year) 

Student Commuter $856 

Bart-time Student Commuter 328 

(undergraduate and law students, £ew«r than 1 2 credit 
hours, graduate students, fewer ttian 9 credit hours; 
proof of part-time emoUmeDt must be provided) 

Resident Student 856 

Student Motorcycle 328 

Faculty/Staff 1,164 

Part-time Staff 584 

Stafi'Motorcycle 370 

Daily 12.00 

Metere (per hour) 2.00 



Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 21 



Graduate Students 

Graduate Student Association (mandatory for all full-time 
and part-time graduate students each satiester) 

Full-time and part-time students (per semester) . $30 
Maintaining Matriculation (each -semester) . . . . 1048 
SIS Program Fee (for SIS master's students adinitted 

for fell 2004 and at\er) 

Full-time (9 or more credit hours) 

(per semester) $750 

Part-time (6-^ credits hours) 

(per semester) $500 

Master's and Doctoral Comp^hensiveExaniinatiDn 

AppUcation 25 

Additional fee if in absentia 100 

Microfilming ofMaster's Thesis or Case Study . . . 25 

Microfilrning of Doctoral Dissertation 35 

Student ID Card Replacement 15 

Dploma Repiacement 25 

Tnmscripts nochaige 

AppUcation fees vary by school, refer to individual school 
(CAS, KSB, SOC, SIS, SPA WCL) web site for fee 
amount and appbcation infonnation. 

Undergraduate Students 

Student Confederation (mandatory for all undergraduate 
degree students each semester) 

Full4ime students (per semester) $73.50 

Part-time students (per semesta') 15 

Student ID Card Replacement 15 

Diploma Replacement Fee 25 

Transcripts nochaige 

AEL (Assesanent of Experiential Leeoning) Program 

PortfoUo Assessment 250 

Posting Portfolio Credit on Academic Record 

(per credit homy maximum of 30 credits) 20 

Undergraduate Paper Application (no fee onliney 

Readmission 45 

Law Students 

Goieral Fee (per semester) 

Full-time 192 

Part-time 140 

Summer 30 

Law School JD Application /Readmission $65 

Law School LLM Application $55 



Payment of Charges 

Students and student -authorized parents may make e-check 
payments through the wd) portal at ny.a merican.edu . For more 
infomiation, call Student Accounts at 202-885-3588. 
Personal check payments may be mailed to; 

American Lfaiversity 

Student Accounts 

P.O. Box 17539 

Baltimore, MD 21297-1539 

Other correspondence should be sent to: 

American University 

Student Accounts 

Asbury300 

4400 Massachusetts A\e NW 

Washington, DC 20016-8073 

Paymaits may also be made in person at Student Accounts, 
Asbury 300, Monday through Friday, 9:30 am to 5:00 pm 
Advance Registration/Direct Registration 

Students registering during advance regisd^tion witti billing 
for file semester must pay the balance due on or before flie due 
date as indicated on the bill. 

Students registering after the advance registration period (di- 
rect registration) must pay the balatKe due, less expected finan- 
cial aid, on the day they register 
The American Guaranteed Tuition Single 
Payment Plan 

Available to incoming fieshmen, flus plan allows studoits to 
stabilize tuition expenses by prepaying four years' tuition at the 
entering academic year rate. For more infomBtion call Miiii 
Phung at 202-885-3559. 
American Installment Plan 

The American InstaUment Plan (AIP) is available to all 
fiill-time students. This jian covers the academic year and re- 
quires ten monthly payments from June 1 through March 1 , or 
twelve monthly paymerts from May 1 through April 1. For 
more information, call Student Accomits at 202-885-3541. 
Late Payment and Financial Restrictions 

A finance charge may be assessed against a student's account 
for feilure to meet the initial payment due date. The university 
will use a rate of 1 percent per month to compute the finance 
charge. The university figures ftie finance charge on the student's 
account by applying the 1 percent per month to the adjusted bal- 
ance of the student's account. 

In addition, feilure to make payment when due will result in a 
financial "restriction" being placed on the student's account. The 
financial restriction will result in a "hold" being placed on the 
student's academic recoids, including transcript and diploma, 
and may also result in denial of advance registration and use of 
the payment pJan orotha' credit pnivileges. 

If a student'scourses are dropped due to nonpaymait, a finan- 
cial restriction wUl be placed on hisor her account. Restrictions 



22 Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



may be removed following the reinstatement of all courses origi- 
nally dropped. To reinstate courses, the student mist make ar- 
rangements with tiie Collections Office and pay the account in 
ftill (including a $100 reinstatement fee and aU associated fi- 
nance charges). The university reserves the right to delay clear- 
ance until a personal check or e-check clears a financial 
institution. 

A student who has once bad a finaDcial restriction placed 
against his or her account may be denied fiiture advance regislra- 
ticn and payment plan privileges even though the student has 
been reinstated upon payment o f the reinstatanent fee . Repeated 
failure to make payments when due may result in severance of 
the student's relationship witfi the university. 

Students who incur finandal oUigations in the parking and 
traffic office, library, health center, or athletic department may 
be subject to late payment fees and financial restriction proce- 
dires. 

Studoits who fail to pay tuition or fees wiUbe responable for 
all costs of collection, including attorney's fees in the amount of 
1 5 percent of the balance due. 
Employer or Agency IXiilion Assistance 

A student requesting enployer or agency billing arrange- 
ments mist fumisfa Student Accounts with a veJid contract or 
purchase order before &e fiist day of dasses. 

A contract or purchase order must ccntain the following in- 
formation: (1) student name and ID numbei; (2) term of atten- 
dance, (3) specific costs (and dollar amounts) to be paid 

by the sponsor (tuition, books, suppHes, fees), (4) sponsor's 
billing address, and (5)contract orpurchase ordernumber or ac- 
counting appropriation, if applicable. Documentation submitted 
in Ueu of a valid purchase order will not relieve a student of fi- 
nancial responsibility. 

In case of partial assistance, the student is requiied to pay the 
balance o fhis or her tuition cost s at the time of registration in or- 
der to be considered registered. A student portion whidi quali- 
fies for one of the univeraty payment plans is to be paid 
according to that pian . Failure to comply wiU result in the assess- 
ment of a 1 percent per month finance charge. (See Late Pay- 
ment and Financial Restrictions, above.) 

A student oititled to Campus Store credit may obtain a book 
charge form from Student Accounts. Purchases are permitted 
through the end of the Add/Drop period. 

Failure to submit vouchers in a timely manner may result in 
the assessnoit oflate fees. Astudent isrespcaisible forpayment 
ofany billed amounts which have been disallowed by his or her 
sponsor 
Employee 'Hiition Benefits 

Only full4ime permanent faculty or staff eiTplo>ees of 
American IMvereity are ehgible for tuition benefits. There is a 
nonrefimdable $50 registration fee each seriBSter, in addition to 
any special course fees, and mandatory sport, tedmotogy, and 
activity fees. Late registration fees are not applicable to faculty 
and stafiT using etuployee tuition benefits. 



The Tuition Remission AppUcation is availalie online at 
my.american.edu . For more information, contact Human 
Resources at 202-885-2591 . 

Refunds and Cancellation of Charges 

Course Drops 

Studaits who reduce their course load (except for fiiU4ime 
undergraduates maintaining 12 credit hours or more) by drip- 
ping courses during the refund p«iod of the semester wiU have 
the course tuition cancellation calculated as of the date of the 
course drop. The student's account must show a credit balance 
before a refund will be processed 

MBA modules and other courses on nonstandard schedules 
have different refund pohcies, percentages, and dates. In addi- 
tion, tuition and fee refund policies and deadlines for study 
abroad and other special programs may differ by program and 
location Students should check with the approjmate office for 
specific guidelines. 

Discontinuing attendance in class or notifying an instructor 
does not constitute an official course drop. 
Withdrawal 

Students who completely withdraw fiomthe university must 
submit the appropriate forms to the Office of the Registrar and 
Housing and Dining Programs. The amount of tuition to be can- 
celed win be calculated as of the date which the withdrawal 
forms are received in ftie Office of the Registrar and in accor- 
dance wifli tiie tuition cancellation schedule, below. If ttie with- 
drawal results in a re fund, the request for refund should be made 
in Student Accounts. The student's account must show a credit 
balance before a refund will be processed. 

Discontinuing attendance in classes cr notifying instructors 
does not constitute an official withdrawal. Students who do not 
officially wittidraw during the cancellation praiod by siimiitting 
the appropriate forms to the Office of tiie Registrar will be re- 
sponsible forpayment of the fiiU amount of the ai^cable tuition 
and fees. 
TUtion Cancellation Schedule 

The cancellation percentage is based on the date of fee 

course drop or withdrawal: 

Drop/Withdrawal through ttie second calendar week 

of classes 100% 

DropAVithdrawal through ttie third calendar week 

of classes 50% 

DropAVithdrawal through flie fourth calendar week 

of classes 25% 

Withdrawal afler the fourth calendar week 

of classes NONE 

Note: the calendar week for cancellation of tuitbn ends on Fri- 
day (adjustments are made for le^ hohdaysthat fall within the 
first four weeks ofthe semester). Students should dieckthe Aca- 
demic Calendar for spiecific dates for each semester. 



Tuition, Expenses, and Finaocial Aid 23 



Housing 

Requests for cancellation of nxim chaiges must be initiated 
by the student in writing to Housing and Dining Programs, An- 
derson Hall , by the withdrawal deadlines. The student must then 
request any apphcable refund through Student Acoountsi 

The cancellation perceiitage is based on the date of 

withdrawal: 

\Mthdrawal ttirough the first calendar week 

of the semester 75% 

Withdrawal in the second cakndar wedc 

of the semester 50% 

Withdrawal in the third calendar week 

of the semester 25% 

Withdrawal al^er ftie third calendar weds. 

of the semester NCNE 

Note: academic dismissal will result in a prorated charge fijr 
the weeks the student resided in univetsity housing 
Meal Plan 

Students willonlybepenriittedtodecreaseordroptheirmeal 
plan during the first 1 5 days of the semester Meed plan adjust- 
ments are made on a daily prorated basis, not by the nuirfcer of 
meals used. Requests for meal plan cancellations rrust be initi- 
ated in person at one of the Housing and Dining Programs loca- 
tions, Rockwood Building or Anderson Hall. Students then 
request any applicable refund through Student Accounts. Meal 
plan increases or sign-upsmay be done atany tin* during the se- 
mester. 



Medical Withdrawal Policy 

No special waiver or nefxuid of tuition and fees is made when 
a student discontinues attending classes due to medical reasons. 
Howevei; when a student is hospitalized on an emergency basis 
and is there foie un^le to forrrBlly wittictaw from classes, the 
Registrar is auflioriiBd to process a retroactive withdrawal based 
on the last date tiiat the student attended dass. The student must 
present eviderKe ofhis or her hospitalization and the date of last 
attendance in dass as verified by the instructor. Provided ttiat the 
retroactive wi&drawal date falls within the tuition cancdlatico 
period, the student's account will be adjusted accordingly. 

Tuition Refund Insurance 

The Tuition Refund Plan can ninimize financial loss in- 
cuned in a medical withdrawal from the university. This dective 
insurance plan provides coverage for tuition and housing 
charges. The fJan extends and enhances the univereityls pub- 
lished reflmd policy. To partidpate, appIicatioDs and fees must 
be returned before the first day of fall semester classes. For spe- 
cific benefits and lirtritations, premium, and other information, 
contact the student health insurance coordinator at 
202-885-3298. 



24 Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 



Undergraduate Financial Aid 



Fornure information contact Financial Aid at 202-^85-6100 
or e-mail: financialaid@american.edu or go to: 
http: //admissions.american.edu 
'Tinancing Your Ltadeigraduate Education" 

Application for Financial Aid 

American University has an extensive program of scholar- 
ships, bans, and grants The federal progranB in which Ameri- 
can Uriiveraty participates include: Federal Perkins Loans, 
Federal Direct Stafford Loans, Parent Loans for Undergraduate 
Students (PLUS), Federal PfeU Grants, Federal Supplemental 
Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG), and Federal 
W)rk-Study (FWS). Toreceive considaation for finandal aid, a 
student must be a United States citizen or eligible non-dtizen in 
a degree program 

AH new or readmitted imdergraduate students must foUow 
these steps to receive priority consideration for financial aid 

• Submit admissions aj^lications and all necessary 
suppoiting documents to the Admissions OtTice by the 
appropriate deadlines 

• New Early Decision fiesfaman applicants must submit the 
American University Institutional Financial Aid 
AppUcation (IFAA) by Noven±)er 15 

New Regular Decision freshman ^jplicants must submit 
the IFAA by February 15 
NewtransferappUcantsrtustsubmitthe IFAA by March 1 

• All undeigraduate students must complete a current Free 
Apjdication for Federal Student Aid(FAFSA). The FAFSA 
must be received by the federal processor no later than 
February 1 5 for all ficshman appUcants and no later than 
March 1 for all transfer spphcants." 

• C oirplete and submit any other documerSs as requested by 
Financieil Aid. 

New students should not wait to be ailmitted before filing tiie 
FAFSA and AU Supplanent. A financial aid application has no 
bearing on a student's admission application. However, a stu- 
dent will not receive final considaation for aid until he or she is 
admitted to a degree {Rogram. 



Notification Dates: 

Eariy Deciaon Fre^unen 

Regular Decision Fredimen 

Transfer 

Continuing Undergraduates 



Januaiy 1 

Aprill 

Beginning May 1 

Beginning March 1 



Satisfactory Academic Progress 

Recipients of federal (Title TV) or institutional funds must 
maintain satisfactory academic progress to ward their degree ob- 
jective to remain eligible for financial assistance. 
Minimum Standards 

• Full-time undergraduate financial aid recipients must 
maintain at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average and 
complete 24 credit hours per academic year. 

• Part-time undergraduate financial aid recipients must 
maintain at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average and 
conplete four-fifSis (80 percent) of all attenpted credit 
hours. 

• All students nBJst complete their acalemic program within 
1 50 percent of the nonnal time limit of that academic 
program as defined in the Academic Regulations. 

• Merit-based scholarship recipients may have different 
standards than those listed above . Please refer to the criginal 
awand notification regarding merit award eligibility criteria. 

Special Considerations 

The following alternative grading options do not count to- 
ward the grade point average but do have an inpact on students ' 
satisfactory academic progress: 

• Withdrawals (W), Administrative Withdrawals (ZL), 
Audits (L), and Fails on PasaTail option (ZF) ccunt as 
credits attempted but not earned, andhaveno inpad on ttie 
grade point average. 

• Incompletes (I), Unreported Grades (N), and 
Adminislrative Failures (ZX) count as credits tempted but 
not earned, and are fectored as a grade of F. 

• Pass (P) counts as credits attenpted and earned, but has no 
impact on the grade point average. 

• In Progress (IP) courses are exdudedfromthe calculation in 
the initial academic progress evaluation. Students have one 
calendar year from the beginning of the course to 
successfully complete the course. If not completed in that 
time fiame, the course counts as credits attempted but i»t 
earned, and is fectored as a grade of F. 

Frequency of Monitoring 

Each student 's academic progress is neasured once yearly in 
June, after spring grades are posted. Financial Aid will noti^' in 
writing students wiio are not maldng satisfactory progress. 
Academic Appeals 

All questions regarding the factual substance of academic re- 
cords and all requests fbrchangesto those records must be made 
to ttie academic departments. The Academic Regulations de- 
scribe the petitionprocess. Financial Aid has no aufliority to alter 
the academic record of a student. 



Tuition, Expenses, and Fimncial Aid 25 



Re-Establishing Financial Aid Eligibility 

For a student who has failed to maintain satisfactory aca- 
demic progress, eligibility for financial aid funds may be 
re-established in a number of ways. Among these are: the peti- 
tioning procesB described in the Academic Regulations, the 
changingof agrade; summer sessicn attendance; and the com- 
pletion of incomplete or in progress courses. Please note that 
funds are not set aside for students in these circumstances. Even 
i f the appeal is granted, funds may no* be available atthat time. 
Financial Aid Appeals 

Onoccasion,a student may feil to maintain satisfactory prog- 
ress due to very serious drcumstanoes that caused a major dis- 
ruption to that student's ability to successfully complete his or 
her course woiic. Students with mitigating crcumstances 
must request reconsiders tion in writing to Financial Aid 
prior to July 1. The request shouldinclude a comprehensive de- 
scription of the circumstances and documentation fiom at least 
two qualified persons who can verify the information. The Ap- 
peab Corrmittee will review 4ie appeal, make a recomnenda- 
tion and send a letter of response to the student. 

Refund and Repayment Policy 

For American University's refund poUcies regarding tuition, 
housing and meal plan charges, see Refunds and Cancellation 
of Charges. 

The American University refund policy does not apjiy to 
first-time Amaican University students. A "fjrst-time student" 
is defined in Federal regulations as any student who has not at- 
tended at least one class at American Lhiversity, or wtio re- 
ceived a fuU refund for previous attendance at American 
University. 

Federal (Title TV) Financial Aid Recipients 
Return of Title FV Funds PoUcy 

As federally-mandated, Fedaal (Title IV) aid rec5)ients who 
withdraw fiom classes aie subject to tiie following nefimd pol- 
icy: 
Complete withdrawal from all classes: 

University charges are prorated per the university tuition can- 
cell^on schedule, based on the date of ttie course drop. 

Students who withdraw fit)m all of their classes before com- 
pleting the first 60 percent of the semester wUl have a portion of 
their fimncial aid prorated, based on their length of attendance 
during the semester Based on this jroration, all or a portion of 
the student's financial aid will be returned to the appropriate Title 
rV financial aid program 
Partial withdrawal from classes: 

Students who withdraw from some but not all of flieir classes, 
at any point during &e semester, wiD haw their financial aid re- 
calculated based on the final number of credit hoias enrolled. 

Students wifiidrawing before the end of the semester may 
also need to repay funds received for non-institutional costs 



(ofl'-campus room, board, books, and personal expenses) under 
a Title FV program. In this case, the university detennines 
whether or not the student received an overpayment If the mon- 
ies disbursed for non-institutional costs are more than the 
amount determined to be the actual non-institutional costs for 
the period of enrollment, the studed received an overpaymert 
and may be responsible for retiming funds to American Univer- 
sity 

Questions about how the refund and repayment regulations 
may afiect a student's financial aid ^ould be referred to flie stu- 
dent's Financial Aid counselor prior to withdrawing fiom the 
university. 

Scholarships 

Undergraduate University Sch(4arships 

The Admissions Committee makes all merit-based scholar- 
ship decisions and notifies students at the time ftiey a^ admitted 
Merit awards range fix)m$3,000 to fiill tuition per year. Scholar- 
ships awarded to selected applicants include: 

• lYesidential Scholarship 

• Dean's Scholarship 

• Lead&ship Scholarship 

• National Achievement, National Merit, and National 
Hispanic Scholarships 

Awarded to freshman applicants who were named National 
Achievement and National Merit finaUsts and Nationed 
Hispanic semi-finaUsts who have designated American 
University as their first-choice college with the National 
Merit Schdarsh^ Coiporation by February 1 of their senor 
>«ar. 

• Athletic Scholaiship 

Interested students should contact the coacfa of fee sport in 
which ttiey excel. 

• United Mefliodist Scholardiip 

For the chQdTen of active, ordained Methodist rrnnisters. 
Private/Restricted Scholarships 

The university has a limited nuniier of scholarsh^s that are 
funded annually through endowment by donors. Applicants are 
reviewed by Financial Aid for eligibility for these scholarships 
and no separate apfdication is required. 

Grants 

Grants are ised-based awaids that do not have to be repaid 
and may originate form American IMiversity, flie federal gov- 
ernment, or state governments. 
American University Programs 

AU graats are ofiered to eligible admitted students who dem- 
onstrate financial need, and may be offered in addition to an AU 
scholarship. 



26 Tuition, Expenses, and Finandal Aid 



Federal Programs 

Federd PeB Grant Program: This grant is oflfered to students 
danonstrating exceptional financial need. Awards range fiom 
a^jproximately $400 to $4,000 per year 
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 
(ESEOG): This grant is offered to students demonstrating ex- 
ceptional financial need. Awards depend on need and the avail- 
ability of funds. 
State Pl-ograms 

Many states adninister grant programs which residents may 
apply for and receive while attending American University. Stu- 
dents ^ould check with guidanoe counselors and state giant 
agencies regarding up-to-date application ptocedures and eligi- 
bihty factors. 

Loans 

AU Educational Loan 

The AU Educational Loan (AUEL) is available to students 
who have financial need and is finded through American llii- 
versity. Repayment begins ax montiis after graduation. 
Federal Loan Programs 

Federd Direct Stafford Loan: This loan is guaranteed by the 
federal government. There are two types of Stafford Loans; Sub- 
sidizedFederal Loans are foreUgible students who have demon- 
strated financial need; students who do not have demcostrated 
need are ehgible for an Unsubsidi2Bd Federal Loan. Repayment 
for both begins six months after graduation or when the student 
drops below 6 wedit hours in any semester. No interest is 
charged on Subsidized Federal Loans wiiile 4ie student is in col- 
lege, iiierest does aoraue on Unsubsidized Federal Loans. 



Undergraduate students may borrow vp to $2,625 for the first 
year of study, $3,500 fcr the second year; and $5,500 per aca- 
demic >ear after completing two years of undergraduate study. 
Federd Perkins Loan: This loan is ftmded through American 
University and the fedo^ government Federal regulations re- 
quire that this loan be given to students with exceptional need 
Awards vary depending on need and a vailabiUty and rqjayment 
begins nine months after graduation. 

Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS): This fed- 
eral loan program is funded through pirivate lenders and is 
available to the parents of dependent undergradu^ students to 
assist them in meeting educational expenses. Repayment begins 
within 60 days of the loan's second diS)ursement. 

Federal Work-Study Program (FWS) 

This program for students with financial need provides flje 
opportmity to work part-time and use earnings toward educa- 
tional expenses 

Tuition Exchange 

American University participates in the Tuition Exchange 
Program for faculty and stafifmembers. Students whose parents 
are employed by one of ttie pertic^ting instituticns may be eh- 
gible for a Tuition Exchange Scholarship. 

Tuition Remission 

Full-time faculty and staff members and their spouses or do- 
nEstic partners are ehgible for tuition benefits. There is a $50 
registration fee (nonrefimdable) per semester. 



Graduate Financial Aid 



For more information, contact Financial Aid at 
202-885-6100 or e-mail: financialaid@amaicaaedu or go to: 
http://admissions.american.edu 
'Tinandng Your Graduate Education" 

Application for Financial Aid 

American University has an extensive program of scholar- 
ships, bans, and grants. Graduate honor awards, fellowships, 
asistantships, and study grants are available. 

All new or readmitted graduate students must foUow these 
steps to receive fmority conaderation ft)r fiiEmcial aid 

• Submit admissions applications and all necessary 
supporting documents to the appropriate school or 
departmrait by the establi^ed deadlines. 

• Complete a Free AppUcation for Fedo-al Student Aid 
(FAFSA) for federal aid and apply for admisson by 
February 1 to be considered for fellowships and 
assistant^ips. The FAFSA should be received by the 
federal procesang center by March 1 in order to rtBet the 



fmancial aid priority deadline. The AU code number for the 

FAFSA is 001434. 
• Complete and submit any other documents as requested by 

Financial Aid. 
Note: The appbcation deadline for fellowship and assistantshq) 
consideration is February 1. The March 1 deadline for flie 
FAFSA is for federal aid only. 

New students should not wait to be admitted before filing fee 
FAFSA A financial aidapplicaticxihasno bearingon a student's 
admission application. However, a student will not recdve final 
consideration for aid until he or she is admitted to a degree pro- 
gram. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 

Recipients of federal (Title TV) or institutional funds must 
maintain satisfactory academic progress toward their degree ob- 
jective to remain eligible for financial assistance. 



Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 27 



Minimum Standards 

• Full-time graduate financial aid recipients must maintain at 
least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average and complete 1 8 
(Tedits homs per academic year. 

• ftirt-time graduate financial aid recipients must maintain at 
least a 3.0 cumulative grade point averagp and conplete 
four-fiflhs (80 percent) of all attempted credit hours. 

• All students must complete ttieir academic program within 
150 percent of the normal tin* limit of that academic 
program as detuKd in the Academic Regulations . 

• Merit-based scholarship recipients may have different 
standards than those listed above. Please refer to flie original 
awardnotification regarding merit award eligibility criteria. 

Special Considerations 

The following alternative grading options do nrt count to- 
waid the grade point average but do have an inpact on students' 
satisfectcry academic progress: 

• Withdrawals (W), Administrative Withdrawals (ZL), 
Audits (L), and Fails on Pass/Fail option (ZF) count as 
credits attempted but not earned, and have no impact on the 
grade pwint average. 

• Incompletes (I), Unreported Grades (N), and 
Administrative Failures (ZX) count ascredits attemprted but 
not earned, and are factored as a grade of F. 

• Riss (P) counts as credits attended and earned, but has no 
impact on the grade point average. 

• tiProgress(IP)coursesareexcludedfromtiiecafculationin 
ttie initial academic progress evaluation. Students have one 
calendar year from the beginning of the course to 
successfully cotrplete the course. If not completed in that 
time frame, the course counts as credits atten^ited but not 
earned, and is factored as a grade of F. 

Frequency of Monitoring 

Each student's academic progress is measured once yearly in 
June, aftCT spring grades are posted. Financial Aid will notify in 
writing students who are not making satisfactory progress. 
Academic Appeab 

AH questions regarding the &ctual substance ofacadendc re- 
cords and all requests forchangestothoserecords mist be made 
to fee academic departments. The Academic Regulations de- 
scribe thepetition proces& Financial Aidhas noauttiority to alter 
the acadonic lecord of a studait. 
Re-Establishing Financial Aid Eligibility 

For a student who has failed to maintain satisfactory aca- 
demic progress, eligibihty for financial aid fiinds may be 
re-established in a number of ways. Among these are: the peti- 
tioning process described in the Academic Regulations; the 
changing of a grade; sunnier session attendance, and the com- 
pletion of incomplete or in paogress courses. Please note thai 
funds are not set aside for students in these circumstances, even 
if the appeal is granted, fiinds may not be available atthat time. 



Financial Aid Appeals 

(])n occasion, a student may faO to maintain satisfactory progress 
due to veiy serious dreuiTEtanoes that caused a major disruption to 
that studeri's ability to sucoessfiilly conplete his cr her course woik 
Students with mit^fiting circumstances must request reconsid- 
eration in writing to Financial Aid prior to July 1 . IIk lequesi 
should include a corrprehensi\« description of flie circumstances 
and document^ion fiom at least two qualified persons \\bo can ver- 
ily fee infcrmation. The AppealsConmittee wiUreviewtheappeii, 
make a reoommendalion and send a letter ofre^xuse to fee student 

Refund and Repayment Policy 

For American University's refimd poUcies regarding tuition, 
housing and meal plan charges, see Refiuids and Cancellation 
of Charges. 

The American University lefiind policy does not appJy to 
first-time American University students. A "first-time studenf ' 
is defined in Federal regulations as any student who has not at- 
tended at least one class at American Uhiva^ity, or who re- 
ceived a lull refund for previous attendance at American 
University. 

Federal (Title TV) Financial Aid Recqiients 
Return of Title IV Funds PoUcy 

As federally-mandated. Federal (Title IV) aid recpients who 
withdraw from classes are subject to the following reflind pol- 
icy: 
Complete withdrawal fi-om all classes: 

University charges are jrorated per the university tuition can- 
cellation schedule, based on the date of fee course drop. 

Students who withdraw from all of their classes before com- 
pleting the first 60 perceii of the semester will have a portion of 
their financial aid prorated, based on feeir length of attendance 
during the semester Based on this proration, aU or a portion of 
the student's financial aid will be returned to fee appropriate Title 
TV finandal aid program. 
Partial withdrawal from classes: 

Students who withdraw fixim some but not all of their classes, 
at any point during fee semester, will have their financial aid re- 
calculated based on the final number of credit hours enrolled. 

Students wifedrawing before fee end of the semester may 
also need to repay fiinds received for non-institutional costs 
(off-campus room, board, bodes, and personal expenses) under 
a Title rv program. In feis case, fee university determines 
whether or not the student received an overpayment. If fee mon- 
ies disbursed for non-institutional costs are more than the 
amount determined to be the actual non-institutional costs for 
the period of airoUment, fee student received an overpayment 
andmaybere^Mnsible for returning fimds to American Univer- 
sity. 

QuesticDS about how fee refiind and repayment regulations 
may affect a student's financial aid ^ould be referred to fee stu- 
dent's Financial Aid counselor prior to withdrawing fixxn the 
university. 



28 Tuition, Expaises, and Financial Aid 



Federal Loans 

Graduate students who qualify for federal StafToid loans may 
borrow up to $ 1 8,500 every two semesters. All federal ban pro- 
grams require the FAFSAbe filed before eligibility can be deter- 
mined. To be eligible for federal need and non-need based loans, 
graduate students must be: 

• a U.S. citizen or permanent resident 

• enrolled in a degree-granting academic program 

• registered for at least 6 credit hours per semester 
Federal loans mist be repaid. Repaymait will b^in ax 

months after graduation or after dropping below half-time sta- 
tus. Federal interest rates are variable but will never exceed 
8.25% on a federal loaa Please contact Financial Aid for current 
interest rates 

Those students who need more than $ 1 8 ,500 over two semes- 
ters may takeout aprivate loan to help cover any ranainingedu- 
cational expenses The amount that may be borrowed in an 
outside loan varies. 

American University Programs 

Graduate Merit-Based Awards 

American University is committed to quality graduate educa- 
tion that is responsive to the needs of students, disciplines, the 
uni versfy, and the larger corrmunity. Our goals are to provide a 
high quality educational experience for our students and to offer 
graduate support that assists students in compleling their pro- 
gramsof study. To this end the university has set priorities forthe 
allocation and a\^a^ding of graduate assistaitfships and fellow- 
shifw as shown below. 

Recipients of all awards (except Dissertation Fellowships) 
mist be fiill-time degree students. Spedfically, this requires ftat 
a recipient be registered for a minimum of 9 credit houis during 
each semester of the acadonic year. Award recipients mist 
maintain fiiD-time status in order to continue to receive their 
award during the academic year. Awaids are intended to assist 
graduate students to pursue full-time education 



The miversity has eslabli^d the foUowing awards to assist 
graduate students: 

Graduite FeUowMps are merit-based awards that the univer- 
sity oilers in orderto attract ttie most outstanding students in the 
discipline. These awards are given to new graduate degree stu- 
dents and normally provide ttie redpient up to 24 hours of tuition 
remission in degree-related courses in a given academic year 
and may also provide a stipend. The tuition remission ^ould be 
used during the academic year but may with the permission of 
the teaching unit head be used during flie summer sesaon. 
Special Opportunity Awards for minority students — American 
Indians, African Americans, Asian/Pacific Islander Americans, 
Alaskan Native Americans, or Hispanic Americans — provide 
tuition remission from 6to 24 hours of degree-related courses in 
a given academic year. The tuition remission should be used 
during the academic year but may wifli the pemission of the 
teaching unit head be used during the summer session. 
Hall of Nations Awar4is are made by the deans of CAS, KSB, 
SCXZ", SIS, or SPA, as appropriate, with the approval ofihe Dean 
of Academic AfTairs. These awards, which are fortuition remis- 
sicm only, are giwn to international students who do not have 
permanent residence status or U.S. citizenship. 
Dissertation Fdhwships are awards that provide recipients 
with a stipend and up to 1 8 hours of tuition remission in one aca- 
dariic year hr dissertation seminar credits only. These awards 
are Umited to students who have completed all doctoral course 
work and cotrqwdiensive examinations and who have an ap- 
proved dissotation proposal at the time of appUcation. Disserta- 
tion fellows are selected by the deans of CAS, SIS, or SPA, as 
appropriate, with the approval of the Dean o f Academic Affairs. 
Designated Awards 

A description ofcther designated awards, such as United Meth- 
odist Awards and Massey Awards and their ehgibility require- 
ments is distributed annually by the Dean of Academic Aflaiis. 



Veterans' Benefits 



Tuition, Expenses, and Financial Aid 29 



American Uni veraty 's degree ptDgrams are approved for en- 
rollment of veterans(andeligiHe dependents of deceased or dis- 
abled vderans) for educational benefits under the various 
federal laws relating to veterans. While every etTort has been 
made to provide accurate and complete information, changes in 
federal regulations and university policy may occur at any time 
without notice. The following should be considered informa- 
tional and not binding on the university. 
New Students 

Veterans entering Amaican University must file a Veterans 
Application for VAEducationalBenefits(22-1990)withace^ti- 
fiedcopyofDD-214th^oughtheOfEceoftheRegist^a^. Service 
men and women wishing to receive Veterans Administration 
(VA) benefits for fee first tin* must present the Servicanan's 
Apfiication 6x VA Educational Benefits (22-1990), signed by 
the Education Office and the Commanding Officer Enrollment 
Certification (22-1999) is seitf to the VA by the Office of the 
Registrar to initiate benefits for the enroDment period. 

Transfer students who have received VA educational benefits 
at another institution and wish to receive VA benefits for the first 
time at American Univeraty should file aRequest for Change of 
Program or Place of Training (22-1995) through the OflSce of 
the Registrar. This form will be sent to the VA with the Enroll- 
ment Certification (22-1999) completed by the university. 
Continuing Students 

Continuing students mist file the American University VA 
claim caid for educational benefits each semester witti the Office 
of the Registrar. AH changes in registration (adds, drops, and 
withdrawals) must be reported to flie Office of the Registrar. 



Payment and Financial Responsibility 

With fee exception of disabled veterans who are training un- 
der Vocational Rehabihtation, all beneficiaries of VA educa- 
tional btaiefits are personally responsible for fee payment of 
their bills to the university. VA chocks for educational benefits 
are sent directly to the address designated on the American Uni- 
versity VA claim card. Students who wish to receive advance 
payment must file an advance payment request fonn. Students 
who are granted advance payment pick up only the first check 
fk)mthe Office of fee Registrar. Thereafter, checks are sent di- 
rectly to fee address on file wife fee VA. 

VA bene fits are awarded on fee basis offee e;q3ecled comple- 
tionof a certain number of credits each semester as stated on the 
Certification form. The VA interprets "completion of credit^' 
differently fiomthe university. Completion of credits is defined 
by the VAas gmdes of A, B, C, D, F, P, orZF. Ffowever, veterans 
who drop below fee anticipated nmrber of credits by receivinga 
W (wifedrawals), L (audit), orN (no grade reported) will be in 
overpayment status according to fee VA Benefits will be re- 
duced for future periods of emollment oi; should no further en- 
rollment occur, students will have to refiind money directly to 
the VA. 

The VA directs the university to notify feem of a change in 
status for students during or immediately after fee end of the 
monfe in which fee change occurs Under mitigating circum- 
stances, exceptions to fee above policies may be made tbrou^ 
the Veterans Administration Regional Office. 

Forms and infomBtion are available fom fee Office offee 
Registrai; Asbury Building, second flooi; 202-885-2235. 




The Cyrus and Myrtle Katzen Arts Center 



Campus Life 



• student Learning and Development 
Services 

• Campus Life Centers 

• Intercultural Programs and Services 



The OflSce of the Vice President of Campus Life is located in 
Butkr Pavilion 400. For more infomiation, call 202-885-3310, 
e-mail campus life@ainaicaaedu or go to: 
w\vw.american.edu/ocl . 

Recognizing students' unique needs and the diversity of 
American University's student body, theOfBce of Campus Life 
promotes students' integration into an indusive university com- 
munity and supports and comfieinents students' preparation for 
lifebng learning and global citizenship. 

The Office of Canpus Life is guided in this mission by as- 
sesanent of students' characteristics, dedication to service and 
advocacy for students, and aocountabUity for our actions. The 
Vice President of Campus Life is the chief student affairs oiSca- 
of the imiversity and reports to the president. 

The OflSce of the Dean of Students is committed to cultivat- 
ing an environment that enriches and supports student develop- 



ment. The dean of students staff provides advocacy, 
information, referrals, and ottier assistance to students, and 
works closely with acadetnic and administrative units to pro- 
mote student success. 

Student Conduct Code 

Each student is expected to adhere to esfablidied standads of 
behavior for members within the university commmity. Stu- 
dents must abide by all federal and local laws as well as all poH- 
cies and regulations of Amaican University. The Student 
Conduct Code describes the rights and responsibilities fijr stu- 
dent conduct. By registering for classes orenroUing at AnBrican 
University, all students acknowledge their awareness of and 
agreement to adhere to the Student Conduct Code. The code is 
published annually in the Studen t Handbook, available from the 
O ffice of the Dean of Students and at: 
w WW. americanedu/handbook. 



Student Learning and Development Services 



The primary purpose of Student Learning and Development 
Services is to assist students in de vebpingthe competencies that 
are aitical for success in the academic siting and beyond Col- 
laboration with faculty is at the core of its programming and 
serves to strengthen its benefits for students. Through the ser- 
vices and programs provided, students may acquire specific 
stdUs that are directly apjiicaUe to their course work. 

Academic Support Center 

The Academic Support Center oflfers programs and s«vices 
to all students to help them develop flie skills and behaviors nec- 
essary foracademic success in colle^. Services include individ- 
ual instruction in time management, textbook reading, note 
taking, and exam pireparatioiL Students may alao tate advantage 
of study skills seminars, referrals for peer tutors, writing assis- 
tance, and supfjemental instruction in selected courses. Services 
for Sudents with leaming disabilities and ADHD include help 
with accommodations, a writing lab, a computer lab, and the 
Learning Services Rugram tor tredimen Specific services are 



available for international students and student-a&letes. Ser- 
vices are provided free of charge, except for spedal program 
fees and modest fees for peer tutors. The Academic Support 
Center is located in Mary Graydon Center 243. 

For more information, call 202-885-3360 or go to: 
www.americaaedu/asc 

Community Service Center 

The Community Service Center pro videsarangeofopportu- 
nities fordiveise membereofttie university community to chal- 
lenge their behefs, explore new cultures, and ^lare their unique 
experiences through public service. K cultivatesa sense of global 
citizenshp that deiiHnds both public service and civil action 
Students and faculty utili2E the resources of Wadiington, D.C . to 
forge academic leaming connections betwetn classroom and 
conmunity through service-learning. 

Some of the projects and programs that are available to the 
community are Freshman Service Experience, the Volunteer 
Clearinghouse, D.C. Reads, Commmity Service Floor, the Ea- 



32 Campus Life 



gje Endowment for Phablic and Community Service, and Com- 
nimity Service Learning Projects. For more information, call 
202-885-SERV (7378)orgoto : www.american.edu/volunteei/ . 

Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center is located in Mary Graydon Center 
214. Services and programs are available to help students de- 
velop the skills and insights they need to understand their own 
feelings and behaviors, solve personal and interpersonal prob- 
lems, and thrive in the university environment. 

The center oflfers individual and gtovcp counseling, aisis in- 
tervention, self-help materials, consultations, and referrals to 
off-campus resources for services not available on campus. 
Counselors also conduct classes and \M3rksfaops on topics re- 
lated to students' well-being (e.g., stress and anxiety, depression, 
anger management, eating and body image concerns, relation- 
ship issues, alcohol and drug use, et cetera). 

The center's staff includes psychologists, social walkers, a 
consulting psychiatrist, and graduate-level clinical trainees. Ser- 
vices are confidential in accordance with professional and legal 
standaids, and are fi-ee of charge. For more information, call 
202-885-3500 or go to: www.anBrican.edu/counseling/ . 

Disability Support Services 

The staifofDisability Support Services works to facilitate the 
full participation of students with physical and psychological 
disabilities in canpus programs and activities. Services and ac- 
canmodaticns are provided to ensure equal access and to pro- 
mote the inclusion and involvement of students with disabilities 
in the American University community. This oflSce also pro- 
vides consultation and in-service training for feculty, staff, and 
students, witti the overall goal of ensuring a canpus environ- 
ment that is welcoming to individuals with disabilities. The of- 
fice is located in Mary Graydon Center 206. For more 
information, caU 202-885-3315 (V/TDD). 

Judicial Affairs and Mediation Services 

Judicial Afiairs and Mediation Services provides an orga- 
nized judicial system founded on prindples of equity, fairness, 
and due process for the resolution of grievances in the American 
University comimnity. In addition, this oflSce promotes the 
learning and use of ahanative dispute resolution methods. 

Judicial Affairs addresses alleged violations of the Studait 
Conduct Code, Regulations for Student Conduct in ttie Resi- 
dence Halls, and other univeisity policies . The Conduct Council 
isa community review board composedof students, faculty, and 
staff members that provides an excellent e;qperiential learning 
opportunity. All students, regardless oftheirmajois, are encour- 
aged to take active roles in ttie judicial system on campus. 

American University's Mediation Services (AUMS) pro- 
vides resources for the resolution of interpersonal and 
inter-group conflicts to all metcbeTS of the AU community. 
AUMS helps parties leam about sources of and responses to 
conflict and flieir roles in this dynamic process. Services include 



conflict consultation, assessment and evaluation, mediation, 
facihtation, and post-conflict reconciliation. Services are confi- 
dential and &ee of charge to all students, feculty, and staff. 
AUMS also provides alternative dispute resolution (ADR) and 
conflict management ^l-bulding workshops. Students, fic- 
ulty, and staff are wekxjme to particpate in basic mediation 
skills training offered each semester. 

Judicial Afiairs and Mediation Services is located in Butler 
Pavilion 408. For more infoimation, call 202-885-3328, e^rail 
JAMS@americanedu or AUMS@americanedu or go to: 
www.american.edu/ocl/jams . 

New Student Programs 

New Studait Programs designs and coordinates orientation 
programs for first year and transfer studenta Through summer, 
fall, and spring orientation programs, flie stafi" assists new stu- 
dents in their transition to American University. The office also 
coordinates Family Weekend in October and other programs to 
enhance the quaUty of life for all American Ltaiversity students. 
For more information, call 202-885-3303, e-mail 
onentation@american£du or go to: 
www.american.edu/ocl/orientation 

Student Health Center 

The Student Health Center (SHC) provides primary medical 
care, minor emergency care, gynecobgical care, imnuniza- 
tions, allergy injections, and health education services to stu- 
daits. Routine office visits are without cost, but additional 
charges may be assessed for ttie allergy clinic, TB testing inmu- 
nizations, and other special services. 

The dinical staff consists of registered ninses and physician 
assistants, si^>ported and sipervised by two internal medicine 
physicians. These primary care practitioners initiate treatment 
and coordinate all aspects of care, including referrals to special- 
ists when indicated. Patients are seen on a walk-in basis. Ap- 
pointments are made for aimual women's healtti exams. To 
sdiedule an appointment, caU 202-885-3380. 
Immunizations 

District of Columbia law requires aU students under age 26, 
attending schoob within the District, to provide proof ofhaving 
had the following imimnizations: 

• Two vacdnations against Measles, Mun^ and Rubella 
(MMR), given after one year of age and at least 30 days 
apart 

• One Tetanus/Diphflieria booster givn within fliB preceding 

10 years 

• Beginning academic year 2003, Hepatitis B and Varicella 
(chicken pox) vaccines are added to existing imnunization 
requirements. 

An immunizatian form is available through the SHC aod 
^uld be conpleted in conjunction with a physician visit in or- 
der to consolidate records and update any missing immuniza- 



CanpusLife 33 



tions. Incomplete iirmunization records, invalid dates, or forms 
which lack a validating stamp cannot be processed. EnroUed stu- 
dents may obtain immunizations at the SHC fiir a fee. For addi- 
tional infcmiation, call 202-885-3384 or go to: 
www.amBricaaediv'ocl/healtbcenter . 

Health Education Program 

The Health Education ftt>gram,supportedby a \\fellness Pna- 
jectTeamof students, faculty, and staff, promotes student health 
and wellness activities on can^s throughout ttie year. Outreach 
activities include residence haU programs, a campu5)-widB 
Health Fair, alcohol and other drug awarenes programs, and 
general health and womai's health education teams 
Student HeaKh Insurance 

Health insurance is mandatory for all fiill-time degree, resi- 
dent, and intemat ional students, unless the student is co vered un- 
der another comparable health insurance plan. The fee is 



Campus Life Centers 



assessed automatically unless waived prior to the deadline. 
Waiver forms must be completed on-hne at my.american.edu . 
Medical insurance coverage is available at an additional cost to 
part-time studoits carrying at least 6 credit hours, spouses, do- 
mestic partners, and children of students enrolled in the student 
health insurance plan. 

For information call the Student Healti Insurance OfBce at 
202-885-3378 or goto: 
www.american.edu/ocl/healthcenter/bealtfa insurance . 

Tuition Refund Insurance Plan 

The Tuition Refimd Plan can minimizs financial loss incurred 
in a medical withdrawal fiom he univeraty. This elective insu:^ 
ance plan provides coverage fcr tuition and housing chaiges. The 
plan extends ani enhances the university's puMished refund pol- 
icy. To participate, applications and fees most be returned befoie 
the first day of &11 semesto- classes. For sped fie benefits and lini- 
tatioos, premium, and other information, contact the Student 
Health Insurance coordinator at 202-885-3298. 



Housing and Dining Programs 

Housing andDining Programs (HDP) is responsible for daily 
operations in American liiiversity's residence haUs as well as 
managertEnt of the professional and student staff. Hoiising and 
Dining Programs is also responsiWe for the management of 
All's ofiF-caitpis apartment building. Park Be&esda. Comple- 
menting the goals of the Office of Campus Life, HDP seeks to 
create and maintain an environment that fosters intellectual, so- 
cial, and anotional gpo wfti. The staff works to provide a safe and 
comfortable Uving environment that encourages reelect for in- 
dividual rights and social responsibility. 

Housing and Dining I'rograms is responsible for apphcations 
for student housing student room assignments, summer hous- 
ing, and conference operations. Physical Plant is responsible for 
the maintenance of equipment as well as housekeeping in the 
residence haU& Housing and DiningPrograms staff oversee mi- 
nor maintenance repairs. 

American liiiversity's nine residence halls have distinct 
characteristics and offer a variety of Uving arrangementa Sev- 
eral special interest housing options are availaUe in the halls, in- 
cluding ttie Community Senice Floor, Honors Prograin, and 
Lecnard Intercultural Hall. 

V^itors to AU's residaice halls must chedc in at the front 
desk and be escorted while in the hall. Residents may not lend 
their access cards and keys to guests. There are no curfews; 
24-hour visitation is the policy in each hall. Overnight guests are 
permittedonly with the agreement of the roommate. In all cases, 
overnight guests are limited to a 3-day stay. Residents are re- 
sponsible fortheir guests'behaviorand nay becharged in lieu of 
their guests for violationsofthe Student Cbnduct Code anddam- 
age to university property. 



The Off-Campus Housing Resource Center at American 
University serves AU students and ftie community by providing 
support to those locking for housing, as well as to those who 
wish to list rental property, h addition to a comprehensive, 
up-to-date wdo site of rental listings, infomiation on land- 
lord/tenant relation^ps, and helpful hints and advice about the 
housing search process are also available. 

Housing is available to undergraduate students on a 
first-come, first-served basis. For firrther information call 
202-885-3370 or goto: www.american.edu/ocl/housing . 

Residence Hall Association 

The Residence Hall Association (RHA) is the student gov- 
ernment and program planning org^inization of the residence 
halls. RHA works with Housing and Dining Programs to ensure 
that university policies and services are responsive to students' 
needs. The Executive Board, ftie hi^est branch of the RHA, is 
the link betweai the administration and students. The Executive 
Board, in conjunction with the hall and fkx)r ofiSceis, organizes 
both hall and campus- wide programs. The Executive Board and 
hall councils are elected in the spring and serve one-year tenns. 
Floor ofiBcers are elected at the beginning of the fell sanester 
and serve one-year terms. Floor officers work witti flie Resident 
Assistants (RAs) to plan activities such as movie nights, study 
breaks, and forums. 

RHA provides both social and educational programming 
within each hall and across campua For more infomiation, call 
202-885-lRHA (xl742), e-mail iha@american.edu or go to: 
www.americaaedu/ocl/housing/iiia . 



34 Campus Life 



Kay Spiritual Life Center 

The Kay Spiritual Life Center is an interfaith house of wor- 
ship and home to a rich array of faith communities, cultural and 
educational programs, student oiganiations, feasts, festivals, 
circles of prayer, and activism. In keeping with the university's 
commitrrBnt to inquiry and diversity, the Kay Spiritual Life 
Center seeks to be not only a center forreUgious life, but a place 
where people of conscience, intellect, and spiritual curiosity 
come with their questions, their dreams, and their struggles. The 
center fosteis a climate of interfaith understanding and open- 
ness, in which matters of faith and value are reco gnized as an in- 
tegral part of human growth and university life. 

Regular services of worship and religious obsravances are 
held throughout the year by Baha'i, Buddhist, Catholic, Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, JewiA, Muslim, United 
MethodisfProte stent, Quaker, and Unitarian UniversaHst com- 
munities. Meditation fiom a variety of traditions is also offered. 
In addition, the center sponsors special interfaith celebrations, as 
well as a variety of workshops, panel discussions, retreats, out- 
ings, and social action opportunities. 

Chaplains fix>m the diverse faith traditions assist in organiz- 
ing events and are available to students, faculty, and staff for pas- 
toral counseling and spiritual direction, residence hall 
programming, advisement on issues of faifli and ethics, Ufe 
events, baptisms, bat/bar mitzvahs, weddings, and memorial 
services. 

The Kay Interfaith Council serves to foster dialogue and dis- 
cussion among the member communities of the Kay Center, 
provides for collective interfaith action, and promotes 
awareness of and respect for interfaith issues. The Center for 
Comirunity Action and Social Justice Coalition (CASJC), also 
located in the Kay Center, is a student-led consortium of chibs 
committed to expressing spirituality through active en^gement 
in pursuit o fa more just and peace fill world . This office serves as 
a resource for AU students seeking to work for responsible so- 
cial change. 

The Kay Spiritual LifeCenter is located at the north end ofthe 
Friedhdm Quadrangle. Hours of operation during the fall and 
spring semesters are 9 ajn. to 9 p.m., Monday through Friday. 
Pot more information, call 202-885-3320, e-mail 
ksJc@amBrican.edu or go to: www.american.edu/ocl/kay/ . 

University Center 

The nissiaD of ttie University Center is to provide a welcom- 
ing environment for AU students, feculty, staff, alumni, and visi- 
tors, and to support programs, activities, and services that 
promote comnunity, individual growth, responsible citizenship, 
and a gjobal perspective. Universaty Event Scheduling (UES) 
manages the scheduling for all events on canpus The student 
staff includes event service coordinators and event crews to fa- 
ciUtate events held in the center's facilities and an information 
desk staff at the entrance to Mary Qraydon Center The Univer- 
sity Center administrative ofiBce is located in Mary Graydon 
Craiter274. 



Student Activities 

Student Activities is adepartment of flie University Centerin 
the Office ofCanpus Life. The Student Activities staff serves as 
advisors, mentors, and facilitatOTs to the student leaders and 
rrKmbo^ of more than 180 recognized clubs, coalitions, student 
government departmerls, and student media groups. The Stu- 
dent Activities team helps to prepare students for life-long learn- 
ing and global citizenship by proiroting and supporting cairpus 
activities that appeal to a diverse community. The main goals are 
to provide students with infonnation on how to get involved in 
student activities at American University and to provide leaders 
with ttie tools they need to be successful Student Activities is lo- 
cated in Mary Graydon Cerier 274. 
Student Activities Organizations 

The four broad categories of organizations that Student Ac- 
tivities advises are: American University Club CouncQ assooa- 
tions and clubs, student coahtions, student government, and 
student media 
American Univeisity Club Council: Associations and Chibs 

Many students oihance their collegjale experiaices by get- 
ting involved in student-sponsored associations and clubs. Stu- 
dent Activities annually recognizes approximately 100 student 
associationsand clubs. These organizations ^)an a wide range of 
interests, including social hfe, academics, business, fellowship, 
misic, journalism, service, recreation, and religion, and altaw 
students to devefop their talents and enhance organi2ational 
skUls. Membership in student associations and chibs is open to 
all registered Amaican University students and can provide op- 
portunities for meeting other students, networking with faculty 
and staff, learning outside the clasaoom, and developing leader- 
ship skills. For more information or to obtain a conplde Ust of 
clubs and organizations contact Student Activities at 
202-885-3390 or go to: www.americaiLedu/ocl^activities . 

The American Ltaivereity Club Council (AUCC) is the gov- 
erning board for all clubs recognized by Student Activitiea In 
addition to allocating student activity fees to 4ie chibs the AUCC 
is responsible for mediating dub disputes, encour^ing collabo- 
ration among clubs, and helping clubs do business more effi- 
ciently. For more information, call 202-885-6453 or emaH 
aucc@american.edu. 
Student Coalitions 

Coalitions are student initiated and run advocacy and pro- 
gramming groups that are desigrsd to centrahze the efforts of 
many student clubs, and organi2ations that have a common 
agenda Coahtions can also include &culty, staff and alurmi 
members. Student Activities currently recogni^s two coali- 
tions: The Ethnic and Cultural Coahtion and the Community 
Action and Social Justice Coalition (CASJC). For mere infor- 
mation or to obtain contact informatian for the Studeid Coah- 
tirais, contact Student Activities at 202-885-3390 or go to: 
www.american.edu/ocl/activities. 



CanpusLife 35 



Student GoverDment 

There are two student govemnrsnt organizations advised 
through Student Activities; the undergraduate Student (jovem- 
mert (SO) and the Graduate Ijeadeiship Council (QLC). 

The Student Govemrrcnt (SO) represents student interests, 
advocates for student consems, and provides service to the stu- 
dent body. The SO executive office is the administrative branch 
of the SO and is located in Mary Giaydon Center 270. It can be 
reached at 202-885-6400 or www.ausg.org 

The Gaieral Assembly (GA) is the legislative branch of the 
SG and is located in Maiy Graydon Center 269 The GA is re- 
sponsible for allocating student activity fees to SG departments, 
enacting legislation to finther&e interests of undergradusie stu- 
dents, approving rules and regulations governing the SQ and 
acting asa fonm forstudent concerns. The Student UnionBoaid 
(SUB) is the social programning division of the Student Gov- 
ernment and books bands, comedians, and other talent, and 
shows movies. The Kennedy Pblitical Union (KPU) is anonpar- 
tisan student lecture bureau. Founded in 1 968, KPU has grown 
into a nationally respected lecture series. 

The Graduate Leadership Council (GLC) is ttie graduate stu- 
dent government at American University. The GIX) is com- 
posed of the five school/college Graduate Student Council 
(GSC) presidents, achairand a vice chair The GLC objective is 
to riBximize students' return on their mandatory student activity 
fees by allocating a greater portion of activity fee revenue to 
each GSC. The GLC also provides studaits with opportunities 
and events mare focused on their field-specific interests as weU 
as advocates for graduate student concems. For more informa- 
tion contact 202-885-2472 or stop by tte GLC Office in 262 
Mary Graydon Center. 



Student Media 

The student oomnimity supports and managies the following 
campus nedia: 

• A-TV is a student-operated television station that airs news, 
sports, and entertainment programs. Located in Mary 
Graydon Center 256, A-TV broadcasts to residence hall 
loimges and rooms except on the Tenley Campus Formore 
information, caU 202-885-2222. 

• American Literary (AmLit) publishes student woiks of 
creative art, photography, and Uterature. It is located in 
Mary Graydon Center 248. For mare information, call 
202-885-6414. 

• American Word is an on-line news magazine written by 
students about students and student-related issues Fornwre 
information, call 202-885-64 18 or go to: www.au wwd. org/ . 

• The Eagle is American Lhiversity's student new^apei; 
pubhdied twice a wedc durin g the academic year and twice 
during the summer months. The newsroom and buaness 
offices are bcated in Mary Graydon Center 252. To contact 
The Eagle, call 202-885-1400 or go to: 
www.theeagleonltne.oom . 

• The Talon, the American Ltaivasity yearbook, captures the 
issues, events, and people that marie each academic year. 
The Talon office is located in Mary Graydcxi Center 250. To 
contact The To/on, call 202-885-1402. 

• WVAU is a student-operated radio station and airs a 
contemporary rmsic format along with a variety of sports 
and enterlaiimient programs to the campus residence halls. 
To contact WVAU, call 202-885-1212. 



Intercultural Programs and Services 



The primary goal of Intercultural Services is to enhance the 
quality of student bfe andto foster one of ftie university 's distinc- 
tive educational charactaistics, which is its cosmopohtan and 
multicultural campus populatbn. 

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and 
Ally Resource Center 

The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Ally 
(GLBTA) Resource Center works to strengthen and sustain an 
inclusive campus community fliat welconBS people of all sexual 
orientations and gender identities by providing support, educa- 
tional resources, andadvocacy. The Resource Centerhouaes a h- 
biary of books and magazine^ hosts events and speakers, and 
conducts campus educational trainings oo a regular basis. All 
programs are open to all tnenfcers of the American University 
comnunity. 

The ofiSce is open 9 a.m to 5 p.m, Monday through Friday, 
and is located in Mary Giaydon Center 201 , The Resource Cen- 
ter can be reached by phone at 202-885-3346, by fax at 



202-885-1883, by e-mail at glbta@american.edu, or go to: 
www. americanediVglbta . 

International Student & Scholar Services 

International Student & Sdiolar Services (ISSS) provides 
cross-cultural advising and progranming to all men4)ers of the 
university cotrmunity, as well as specialized immigration siq>- 
port services to foreign students and exchange visitors. 

ISSS admimstersihe United States Immigration Services and 
the State Department's authorized international education ex- 
change programs. These programs, also known as flie Fl 
Non-Immigiant Academic andLanguage Student Programs and 
the Jl Exchai^ Msitore Programs, assist students, scholars, 
professors, researchers, and ottiers who come to the university 
for temporary periods forthe purpose o f educational exchange . 

To assist international students, specific and unique support 
services are provided in pre-arrival, arrival, on-going, and 
re-entry orientation and guidance ; issuance o f approjriate certif- 
icates of eUgiMity; assistance regarding academic, social, cul- 



36 Campus Life 



tural or personal matters of a cross-cultural nature; practical 
training and work authorization permits, and financial counsel- 
ing and financial certification ISSS is located in Butler Pavilion 
410, 202-885-3350. For more information, gp to 
www.american.edu/ocl/iss 

Multicultural Affairs 

Multicultural Afiairs advocates for an inclusive campus envi- 
ronment that values a pluralistic perspective by collaboratiag 
with all segnsnts of the university to provide academic support 
for ethnic minority students, and educational pro^mnming and 
resources for all. The stafi" provides counseling and tutoring ser- 
vices to African, Asian/Pacific, (Sspanic, and Native American 



students, advises ethnic and cultural clubs, and addresses diverse 
cultural interests throu^ lectures, seminars, historical tours, re- 
ceptions, award oeremonies, and festival events. 

Multicultural Affairs also administers the Frederick EX)u glass 
Sdiolaiship Program, the Summer Transition Enrichment Pto- 
gram (STEP), the High SchoolAItollege hitenoMiip Program 
(M/SCIP), and a mentoring program The office, located in 
Mary Ghiydon Csnter 204, houses historical and cultural mate- 
rials, as well as career information for undergraduate and gradu- 
ate students. For more information, or to be added to the 
Multicultural Affairs listserv, call 202-885-3651, go to 
www.american.edu/ocl/oma , or email oma@ainBrican.edu 



Career Services, Internships, 
and Merit Awards 



The Career Center is located in Butler Pavilion, 5^ floor. For 
more infonnation on job listings, internships, graduate school 
advising, and merit awards, call 202-885-1804 or go to: 
www.american.ediVcaieercentBr. 

Careereducation is a life-long process and the Career Center 
is the place to begin. The Career Center offers a sequence of pro- 
grams designed to acconpany and enhance ftie student's aca- 
demic studies. These integrated, conprehensive career services 
are available for American University students and alunmi. 

Students are encouraged to use the Career Center's services 
to develop career awareness as eariy as possible in &eir aca- 
demic programs. The ceiter's Internship and Oooperatiw Edu- 
cation ProgranB enable students to obtain fleld experience 
related to their education and career goals. The Office of Merit 
Awards helps undeigraduate students identify, prepare, and ap- 
ply for a variety of nationally competitive merit-based scholar- 
ships and fellowshps. The Career DevelopiTBnt unit provides 
students and alumni with career decision-making assistance, job 
search coaching, expert career advising services, graduate 
school advising, and the latest information resources. The Out- 
reach and Marketing unit helps connect students with alumni 
andempbyers through networking pro grams, job and internship 
postings and job fairs, and interviewing programs. 

AH Career Center services may be pureued parallel to class- 
room learning throughout students' academic programs at 
American University. The following is a summary of a career 
decision-making process for each ysar of academic stut^: 
Freshman: Exploring academic majors and career options. 
Sophomore : Deciding on academic msg'ors, exploring career op- 
tions, and gaining hands-on experience through internships. Ex- 
ploring national merit award options. 

Junior: Focusing on career fields and gaining experience in spe- 
cific careers through internships. E;q)loring graduate school and 
national merit awaid options. Informational interviewing wifli 
alumii. 

Senior/Graduate student: Determining and pursuing 
post-graduate goals o f eittier an active job search or application 
for post-graduate study. 

Career Development Services 

Gktduate School Advisii^: To help students explore and pur- 
sue graduate, law and medical school, our staff will guide you 
through individual appointmaits, ^ciahzed wori«shops, and 
mode interviews. 

Career Adviang: Each of ttie colleges and schools otHss uni- 
versity has a career advisor in the Career Center who counsels 



and coadies students on career development, job search 
preparation and employment issues 

Career Resource Library and Computer Lab: Career explo- 
ration and job search assistance is provided through our collec- 
tion of career directories, books, periodiwils, and extensive 
web-based resources. Staff andPeeradvisors are available to as- 
sist studmts to leam about the resources available. One com- 
puter is equipped with software providing access for visually 
impaired studaits. 

Alumni Networking: Thousands of alumni are registered with 
the Alurmi OihLine Community and are willing to provide in- 
formation to students about careers. Alumni are listed by profes- 
sional field, college major, conpany, and geographic location, 
aU readily accessible on-line . Alumni panels and networking re- 
ceptions are conducted regulariy. 

Job Search Workdiops Woricshops and materials are offered 
on resume writing, interviewing skills, salary negotiation and 
more. These are designed to hdp students make a planned tran- 
siticm fiom college to woik and to fully capitalize on internships 
and empbyment opportimitie& 

Self-Assessment Tools: The Myers-Briggs Type Indbator, 
Strong Interest Inventory'™, CareeiLeader College'™, and Self 
Directed Seardi are available to help students assess their career 
interests. 

Special EVents: Career Center staffhost annual events such as 
two job and intem^p fiiirs and Career Weeks, wiiich bring 
speakers and employer representatives to canpus from a wide 
variety of organizations to meet witti students In addition, stu- 
dents have access to numerous networking recqitions wifti 
alumni employers, and multiple enployer presentations 
throughout the academic year. 

OfT-Campus Federal Work Study: Students who have re- 
ceived Federal Woric-Study fimds are encouraged to explore 
working off-campus, tutoring in the conmunity through D.C, 
Reads or D.C. Counts. 

Employment Programs 

Job Listings: l^ingthe latest technology, the Career Center an- 
nually Usts thousands of jobs and internships online for students 
and recent ahimni via AU CareerWeb. This exceptional career 
management tool is used extensively by both students and em- 
ployers. 

Recruiting Program: Graduating students \\iio have signed vp 
with the Career Center through AU CareerWeb may interview 
for a variety of permanoit positions with recruiters who visit 
campus each year or wiio participate in our resume referral 
services. 



38 Career Services, Internships, and Nferit Awards 



Information Sesaons: Sessions offered by employers give stu- 
doits ttie opportunity to learn about the organization, career 
fields, and the interview process at specific employment sites. 
Job and Intemstdp Fairs: Two fairs are held each year, one in 
the faUand one in the spring. Each typically attracts between 120 
to 160 enqjloyers from a wide variety of organizationa 

Internships and Cooperative Education 

In order to integrate the acadeitic curriculum with profes- 
sional experience, Amoican University's academic intemships 
enable students to earn raedit for field e;q)erience related to their 
educatbn and career goals. Many internships are paid and can be 
Ml- or part-time. Positions are with private businesses; local, 
state, or federal governments; or nonprofit community, so- 
cial-service, or international organizations. 

Full-time feculty fixjm all university departments guide and 
evaluate students' experiential learning process in academic in- 
tonships. These experiences en^le students to exptore aca- 
demic and career options, make career decisions, and prepare for 
entry into either an ad vanceddegree program or the professional 
job market. Personal development, acquisition of independent 
learning skills, and a balanced education are other significant 
benefits to students paitici{>ating in intBmshq>s. 
Eligibility and Degree Credit 

Opportunities are open to qualiiled degree-sedcing under- 
gtaduate and graduate students. Applicants mist be in good aca- 
demic standing and mist obtain approval from appropriate 
academic advisors. Students must have completed at least the 
fieshman year (30 credit hours), a full semester as transfer stu- 
d«its ( 12 credit hours), or 9 credit hours as graduate students be- 
fore they are eligible. Undergraduates must have a minimim 
GPA of 2.00; graduate students mist have a minimum GPA of 
3.00. Sdiools or departments may stipulate additional specific 
eligibility criteria. 

There is no guarantee of selecticm, nor is a student obligated 
to accept offers of employment. However, once fatred underthe 
auspices of the university's internship program, a studait is ex- 
pected to cxxnplete all employriBnt and academic oHigations 
agreed to at tiie time of registration. 

Working with an internship advisor, cjuahfied candidates ap- 
ply directly to the empJoyers. Students register for credit (with 
their academic advisors) once an enployer selects themfor apo- 
sition. 

tatemship jobs mist be reviewed and approved for credit by 
internship advisors and fatality. Hundreds of academic and 
noD-ac^ademic internships are posted on the Career Center web 
site each term, and students may propose internships of their 
own design. The credit value depends on the duraticn of the 
work periods, the content of the job, and the academic assign- 
iiBnts. Students are recjuired to demonstrErte what they have 
learned with written journals, papa^, reports, portfohos, confer- 
ences, or seminars. Specific requirements are set by intem^p 
faculty in their syEabi. AU credit-bearing intemshps and co-ops 
are for a minimum of 12 cxDnsecutive weeks per term. 



Students vroridng full time in credit-based experiences are 
considered fliU-time students by the ufriversity. Ltodergraduates 
enroll in xxx-391/491 Internship (1-6 credits) and graduate stu- 
dents inxxx-691 Internship (3-6 credits). 
Cooperative Education in the Federal Government 

Students earn academic credit for federal govennnent co-op 
work experience related to their education and career goals. 
Field experience c»urses ^uld have both an academic and a 
woric c»mponent. These specafic internships may lead to rxm- 
competitive appointments to career positions upon successful 
completion of the studait's degree and work program. 

Undergraduates must have completed 30 credit hours with a 
minimum grade point average of 2.00 to be eUgible. Graduate 
students must haw cxnnpleted 9 caedit horns with a mmirmm 
grade point average of 3.00. Departments may have additicnal 
prerequisites Students must also obtain approval fromttieiraca- 
danic advisor and the Careo- Center. 

Undergraduates enioU in xxx-392Ccx)perati\« Education Fidd 
E;q»rienoe (3-6 credit hours) and graduate students in xxx-692 
Cocjperative Education Field Experience (3-6 credit hours). 
International Internships 

Credit-based internship opportunities are available abroad. 
Students should have a demonstrated knowledge of the lan- 
guage of the cxjuntry in whicii they expect to work, and previous 
work experience. Several months lead time is essential to work 
toward securing these jobs. Information is available from the in- 
ternational intemdiipadvisorin the Career Center, Sth floor But- 
ler Pavihon, at 202-885-1804. 

Office of Merit Awards 

The Cffice of Merit Awards he^s enrolled students preptre 
applic^ons for highly competitive merit based scholardiips and 
feUowdiips, such as the Marshall Scholarship, which provides 
two years of study at a Britidi University; the $30,000 Harry S. 
Truman Scholarship; and the Fulbright Grant for a year of re- 
search and graduate study in a fcHieign country. In 2005-2006 
American LWveisity had one Marshall Scholar, one Truman 
Scholar (of 75 nationwide) and 8 Fulbright Scholars, among 
many other award recipients. Awards exist for nearly ewsry ma- 
jor eind provide a wide range of opportunities. American Univer- 
sity graduate and undergraduate studaits have been awarded 
challenging internships, ttie chance to live, study, and conduct 
research or work abroad, and receive significant fiinds for gradu- 
ate school. 

Students work with the professional slafThcxised in this oflBoe 
to identify appropriate awards and prepare competitive propos- 
als. Appointments may be made by calling the Oareo- Center 
fixjnt desk at 202- 885-1804. Students should begin thinking 
about awards as early as the sophomore year and may be invited 
to participate in the Early Identification Program if they have 
achieved a high degree of academic sucxess fee ir fieshnHn year. 

For more information about national merit awards and fel- 
lowships, ccmtact the QfBce of Merit Awards, located in the Ca- 
reer Center, ^ floor Butler Pavihon, at 202-885 -1 804 or go to: 
www.american.edu/careen;«ater 



Registration 



• Degree and Nondegree Registration 

• International Student Registration 

• Course and Schedule Information 



Academic Advising 

Academic advising is an essential element of the educational 
process. American University requires advisor/student confer- 
ences at least once a semester, but students have the responsibil- 
ity fijT selecting their coinses, meeting course prerequisites, and 
adhering to university policies and procedurea The advisor as- 
sists the student in obtaining a well-balanced education and in- 
terprets university policies and procedures 

Students should be aware of the university's many advising 
resources and utilize these resources as needs arise. Students 
may consult faculty and peer advisors, department chairs, deans, 
and student support services throughout the university. The uni- 
versity has the responsibility to ensure ttiat advising resources 
maintain high standards for serving students etlectively and effi- 
ciently. 

The university uses a degree audit system (DARS) to track 
undergraduate students' academic progress. The DARS report 
displays acadonic program requirements conpleted and to be 
fiilfilled. Priorto an official declaration of major, the reports are 
based on requirements fbrthe student's intended major. Students 
may request a copy of their degree audit report from flieir advisor 
or the Office of fee Registrar, or on line from their myamer- 
ican.edu account. 

Continuing Degree and Nondegree 
Student Registration 

Note: International students in F 1 or J 1 student status are rot eli- 
gible to enroll as nondegree students Intanational students in F 
1 or J 1 student status should refer to specific instructions for in- 
ternational students. 
Course Registration 

Currently-enrolled students receive registration inforriBtion 
through ttieir American Univa^ity e-mail account each fell (for 
spring registration) and spring (for fall and sunmer registration), 
1 .Check your AU e-mail account for information concerning 
registration. 
2. Schedule an apipointment with your academic advisor 

Ncmdegree students receive acadonic advising and registra- 
tion assistance through the academic department in which they 
intend to study 



3. Before meeting with your academic advisor, prepare a draft 
course schedule. It is your responsibility to select a schedule of 
courses that is free of day/time conflicts. For qxlated sdiedule 
information check: http;//american.edu/american/regis- 
trar/schedule.html 

4. \Wth your advisor, confirm or revise your semester course 
schedule. Youradvisor will enter an electronic signature into the 
student registration systan to document authorization of your 
registration. This approval must be in the system before you will 
be allowed to register for classes. 

5 . Be sure that you have met all the prerequisites and obtained aU 
required approvals and authorizations for the courses for which 
you intend to register. You will only be permitted to register for 
courses for which )«u have met the prerequisite or received a 
waiver 

In addition to meeting course prerequisites, all students wish- 
ing to take courses in Appiied Music (Department ofPerfotming 
Arts), the Kogod School ofBusiness, and the Sdiool of Commu- 
nication inxst obtain approval Srom the department or school. 
Students must obtain all permissions or prerequisite waivers 
from the appropriate departments prior to registration. 

6. Qear any outstanding finandal orother stops before attempt- 
ing to register. 

7. Confirm the dates when you are eligible to register. Ltoder- 
graduate students may register starling on the date corre^wnd- 
ing to their corrpleted credits. 

8. Log onto my.angrican-edu , go to "Course Registration," and 
follow the instructions for registration. Before processing your 
registration, you should verify that your chosen course sections 
are still open. To view the Schedule of Qasses from my.amer- 
ican.edu, cUck on Schedule of Classes: Genaal fiom the Learn 
@ AU menu. 

Admisaon to courses is subject to space availability and con- 
firmation of eligibility. Your enrollment ii courses will be con- 
firmed irrmediately, but vaUdation of registration is subject to 
settlement of your studeid account within the stipulated period 
forpayiiBnt of tuition and fees Failure to comply with payment 
schedulesmay result in cancellationof your registration and will 
necessitate reregistering for courses. 



40 Registration 



Note: students will not be allowed to re-enroll in course sec- 
tions that have closed. 

The following are not avaflable for web registration: intern- 
ship, cooperative education field experience, independent study 
or reading, comminity service learning projects, consortium, 
^fchington Semester or AU Abroad programs, alurmi audit, 
maintaining matriculation (graduate students), and any couises 
with a variable credit value. 

Once registered, students can view tfieir sanester schedules 
at My Schedule (under "Academics"). To make registration 
changes (add/drop) within permitted time periods, go to "Course 
Registration" and follow the instructions to add or drop courses. 

See Changes in Registration for more information on add- 
ing and dropping courses. 

Special Departmental Requirements for Nondegree 
Students: 

Departmental eqiproval must be obtained for nondegiee reg- 
istration in courses at the 600 or 700 level. 

School of International Service (SIS): Approval must be ob- 
tained for all couises at the 500, 600, or 700 level. 

Kogod School of Business (KSB): Approval must be ob- 
tained for nondegiee registration in all KSB courses. In addition, 
nondegree students must demonstrate that prerequisites have 
been met. If prerequisites have been completed at a cdlege or 
university ottier than American Univasity, students inist pro- 
vide copies of appropriate tiansaipts. Graduate students mjst 
have satisfactory GMAT scores, and a satisfectoiy grade point 
average in fte last 60 hours of undergraduate work. Students 
mist provide copies of aU undergraduate and graduate tran- 
scripts and GMAT results. 

School of Conmunication (SOC): Ajqiroval must be ob- 
tained for nondegree registration in all SOC courees. 

First-Time Degree and Nondegree 
Student Registration 

Note: AU F-1 and J-1 international students who are enrolling at 
American University for the first time or for a new program are 
required to faring to International Student & Scholar Services 
(I^S) their passport, 1-94, and 1-20, or DS-2019. Nan-native 
speakers o fEnghsh, regardless of citizenship, must take an Eng- 
liMi language proficiency test before they register. International 
students in F-1 or J-1 student status should refer to specific in- 
structions for international studoits. Memational students in 
F-1 or J-1 student status are not eligible to enroll as ncxidegree 
students. 

1 . Schedule an appointment wifli your academic advisor. 
New nondegree students mist meet with an advisor in the 

school or department in which they intend to study. 

2. Withyouradvisor, select your semester course azhedule. Your 
advisor wiU enter an electronic signature into the student regis- 
tration ^^em to document authorization of your registration. 



This approval must be in the systembefore you can be registered 
for classes. 

For updated schedule infonnation check: 
http://american.edu/american/registrar/schedule.html 

Be sure that you have met all the prerequisites and obtained 
all required approvals and authorizations for the cou^s for 
which you intend to register. You will only be permitted to regis- 
ter for courses for which you haw met the prerequisite or re- 
ceived a waiver. 

In addition to meeting course prerequisites, all students wish- 
ing to take courses in AppliedMuac (Department ofPerforming 
Arts), Kogod School of Business, and School of Communica- 
tion must obtain approval fiom the departrrent or school. Stu- 
dents mist obtain all permissions or prerequisite waivers fiom 
the appropriate departments firior to registratioa 
3. New students are eligible to register anytime after the begin- 
ning of General Registration for the semester. Initial registra- 
tions for all new students rraist be processed by your academic 
advisor or by the OflQce of the Registrar. 

Admission to courses is subject to space availability and con- 
firmation of eUgibility. Your enrollment in courses will be con- 
firmed immediately, but vaHdation of registration is subject to 
settlement of your student account wiftiin the stipulated period 
for payment of tuition and fees. Failure to comply with payment 
schedules may result in cancellation of registration and will ne- 
cessitate reregistering for courses. 

Note: students wiU not be allowed to re-enroll in course sec- 
tions ttiat have closed. 

New undergraduates must contact thdr advisor to make any 
changes to their course registration prior to the first day of 
classes for the semester. New graduate students may add and 
drop courses online at any time after their initial registration by 
logging onto rny.american.edu 

See Changes in Re^^istration for more infonnation on add- 
ing and dropping courses. 

Special Departmental Requirements for Nondegree 
Students: 

Departmental approval must be obtained for nondegiee reg- 
istration in courses at the 600 or 700 level. 

School of Intemational Service (SIS): Approval must be ob- 
tained for all couises at the 500, 600, or 700 level. 

Kogod School of Business (KSB): Approval must be ob- 
tained for nondegiee registr^on inall KSB courses. In addition, 
nonde^^e students must draoonstrate that prerequisites have 
been met. If prerequisites have been completed at a college or 
university o&er than American Ltoiversity, students mist pro- 
vide copies of appropriate transcripts. Graduate students mist 
have satisfactory GMAT scores, and a satisfectory grade pomt 
average in ftie last 60 hours of mdergraduate work. Students 
mist provide copies of all undergraduate and graduate tran- 
scripts and C^^AT results. 

School of Communication (SOC): Approval must be ob- 
tained for nondegree registration in all SOC couises. 



R^istration 41 



International Student Registration 

In addition to the registration procedures for continuing or 
new degree students, the following steps must be taken by inter- 
national students (students who are not U.S. citizens or perma- 
nent residents): 

• All F-1 and J-1 international students who are enrolling at 
American University for the first time or for a new program 
are required to bring to International Student & Scholar 
Seivioes (ISSS) flieir passport, 1-94, an! 1-20, or DS-201 9. 

• International students are not required to obtain an 
international student advisor's signature to register unless 
they are registering for an internship or cooperative 
education field experience. 

• International students in F-1 and J-1 status are required to 
register full-time (at least 1 2 credit hours forundo-graduates 
and 9 credit hours for graduate students) for each semester. 
International students with F-1 or J-1 visas who intaid to 
initially register for less than full-time credit hours should 
first consult with an international student advisor. 
International studentswhoregisterforlesslhanafiill course 
bad are required to obtain written permission finm ISSeach 
term. Failure to do so may result in loss of stattis. 
Students wto fail to register full-time or fail to provide 
International Student & Scholar Services (ISSS) with 
oopiesofall required immigratioo documents asoftbe first 
day of classes for the semestw may be prevented from 
registering and must meet with an international student 
advisor in BSS to have the registration STOP removed. 

• Students in B-l/B-2 status are not eligible to register For 
more information regarding this DHS regulation, {dease 
contact the International Student & Scholar Services office. 

• Audit cotirses are not counted toward a fuUcouree of study 
for the purpose of maintaining an F-1 or J-1 status. 
"Iberefore, F-1 and J-1 students may audit couises only if 
they are registered fuH-time for courses taken for credit. 

SEVIS: Student and Exchange Visitor System 

EflFective January 30, 2003, universities enrolling F-1 and J-1 
students are required to report to the DHS any student who fails 
to rtfiintain status or who conpletes his or her program. Each 
term and no later than 30 days after the deadline for registering 
for dasses, universities are required to report ttte following reg- 
istration information; 

1 ) wiietha- the studait has enrolled, failed to enroll, or dropped 
below a foil course of study without auttiorization by Interna- 
tional Student & Sdiolar Services; 

2) current address of each enrolled student; 

3) graduation, termination date of study, or au&orLsd employ- 
ment. 

Questions concerning DHS regulations should be directed to 
International Student & Scholar S«vices (ISSS), Butler Pavil- 
ion 410; teleptone 202-885-3350, fax 202-885-3354. Regular 
oflBoe hours are Monday ttnough Friday, 900 am. to 5:00p.m. 



Audit Registration 

Note: hitemational students in F-1 or J-1 visa statiB should not 
audit comsea Audit courses are not counted to ward a foil course of 
study for the purpose of maintaining an F-1 or J-1 status. 

Students who attend a class but do not wish to receive a final 
grade or aedit for the course nust register as an auditor Tuition 
and fees for auditors are ttie same as those for students register- 
ing for credit. Changes to or firm audit mist be made before the 
last day to add a course. Audit registration is subject to the same 
regulations as credit registration. Faculty may establish stan- 
dards of class participation and attendance for auditing that must 
be met if a student is to remain in audit status. To register as an 
auditor, dioose "Audit" as the grade type when processing your 
registration. 

Internship and Cooperative Education 
Registration 

An internship or cooperative education field experience 
(co-op) is a combination of academic study and substantive 
woik experience , approved by a supervising faculty meni)er in 
advance. Registration for internships and federal co-ops is open 
todegree students in goodacademic standing. Academic depart- 
ments may have additional requirements, but generally the pre- 
requisite for registration at the undeigraduate level is co repletion 
of 30 credit hours of course work (1 2 credit hours for transfer 
students) with a rrnnimum grade point average of 2.0; at the 
graduate level, completion of 9 credit hours with a minimum 
grade point average of 3.0. 

AH students are aicouraged to \Mjrk with an advisor in the 
Career Center. For additional information about intemshps and 
Cooperative Education, call or visit the Career Center, Butler 
Pavilion 5th fkwr, 202-885-1804. Information is also available 
at; www.american.edu/careercaiter 

Registration for iidem^ips or co-ops is during the registra- 
tion period for the Ml or spring sonester or summer session 
Students may add these courses until the end o f the second wedc 
of classes in the spring sonester or summer session and the third 
week of dasses in 4ie fall semester 

Students must have met all prerequisites, secured the woik 
position, and confinned their work schedule with ttieir site su- 
pervisor prior to registration. The student and supervising fac- 
ulty member mist agree upon and document tiie credit value of 
the field experience, depending on the nature of the academic 
component and the number ofhoursrequired for the woik com- 
ponent. The recommended standards for academic credit may 
vary but typically are: 8-10 hours per week for 1-2 credits; 15-16 
hours per week for 3 credits; and 20-24 horns per week for 6 
credits. Students woric throughout the temi(12weeks or more). 

Students must siimit a completed and approved Intem- 
ship'Cooperative Education Registration Fonn along with the 
Intwnship Consent and Release Form to the Registrar's Office. 
FomB are available at: 
http//american.edu/american/registrar/forms . 



42 Registration 



Independent Reading and Study 
Registration 

An independent reading oourae is defined as a course in 
which a student, by arrangement with an instructor, reads a body 
ofmaterial with aminiiiumof fonnal instruction. An independ- 
ent study project is defined as a course in which a student does 
reseaidi on a topic agreed upon by the student andfiie instructor 

Enrollnient for these courses is during the registration period 
for the fall or spring semester or summer session. Students may 
add these courses until the end of the fourth week of dasses in 
the fall and firing semesters or the end of the second \\eek of a 
surrana- session. 

Before processing registration for fiiese courses, the student 
and the supervising faculty member must agree upon and docu- 
ment the title, objective, scope, and credit value (1-6) ofthe pro- 
ject to be pursued. The department chair or program director 
mist approve the project and faculty membw's involvanent In 
particular, he or she must attest that the |it)j ed doesnot duplicate 
a course already oflfered in the semestei's schedule which would 
be available to the student. 

Student s irust submit a corrpleted and approved Independent 
Study Registration Fonn to the Registrar's Office. Forms Eire 
available at: 
hltp://ame rican.edu/american/registrar/forms . 

Community Service Learning Projects 

Undeigraduate students may have tiie opportunity to earn 
credit for community service paformed in corgunction with 
courses in wiiich they are enrolled. In addition to at least 40 
hours of approved field work, conmunity service learning pro- 
jects require an academic conponent related to the course with 
which the service jHDJect is associated. Students earn one credit 
for each conmunity service learning project they successfully 
coir^jlefe, with a maxirrum of three credits applied to gradua- 
tion. Only the pass'fail grading option is available Permission of 
the instmctor of tiie course is required. The Office of Campus 
Life ceitifiescomniinity service organizations andprovides ori- 
entation sessions for students, formore infoimatioo on registra- 
tion for Community Service Learning Projects, go to 
www.american.edu/vohmteg-/cslpreg . 

Consortium Registration 

The ConsortiumofUni veraties ofthe Washington Metropol- 
itai Area combines the resources of area universities and col- 
leges. In cooperation with the Calhohc University of America, 
GaUaudet Ltaiveisity, George Mason University, The George 
Washington University, Georgetown Lbivereity, Howard Lhi- 
versity, Marymount University, Southeastern University, Trinity 
College, the Ltoiversity of the District ofCoIumbia, and the Lfai- 
versity of Maryland, American University offers qualified de- 



gree students the opportunityto enroll forcoursesat any of these 
institutions. 

With the appropriate apf)rovals, unda^graduate and graduate 
degree students may take courses for AU residence credit at 
member institutions ofthe Consortium of Univwsities ofthe 
Wfchington Metropolitan Area, piwvided the course is not of- 
fered at American University. Off-cartpus courses, courses in 
law and medicine, inde[)endent study and reading couises, spe- 
cial institutes, and noncredit courses (except ROTC at 
Georgetown and Howard) are excluded fiomthe consortiura 

To be eligible for this program, students must be fuUy admit- 
ted degree students who are actively enrolled and in good aca- 
daiiic standing. Course registration rmst be approved by the 
American Ltaiveisity dean cr department chair ofthe field of 
study for which registration is requested and by the Office ofthe 
Registrar. Students are responsible for seeming approval at the 
coo{)erating institution when requested 

American University students pay the American University 
tuition rate. Studaits registering for consortium courses at all 
universities will be billed for any special fees (such as lab fees) 
for the course. Consortium registration can be coofinrBd only 
after classes begin at the visited school 

For course selection eligibility and registration, contact flie 
Operations CoordinatcH- for Academic Services in the Office of 
the Registrar at 202-885-2208. Information on the Consortium 
is also available at www.con3ortium.orB. 

Maintaining Matriculation 

Graduate students whose degree requirements are not com- 
pleted and who have not been granted a leave of absence mist 
register each fall and spring semester duringregular registration 
paiods for courses, for thesis or dissertation seminars, or for 
maintaining matriculation. Those who do not will be consideied 
as having withdrawn. Such studerts may then reapply and, ifre- 
admitted, are go vemedby requirements and regulations in efibct 
at the time of readmission. 

During a semester when a student is not enrolled in credit 
course work but isutiliiing the servicesof the university (e.g., to 
prepare for comprehensive examinations or conplete research 
for the thesisor dissertation), ttie student maintains enrolled ^- 
tus by registering for maintaining matriculation, ftie eciuivalent 
of one graduate-level credit hour Schools and depBrtmaits may 
estabhsh specific requirements as to when and forhow many se- 
mesters students may be in maintaining matriculation status 

Students who change degree objective, college, or school, 
whose candidacy for an advanceddegree expires, or who choose 
to conform to new regulations or requirements must be prepared 
to conplete all requirements and abide by all regulations in ef- 
fect at ttie time such a change is made. 



Registration 43 



Alumni Audit Registration 

Graduates orAmoiean LJniversity in good financial standing 
with the univCTsity may enroll in one course each fall, spring, 
and summer semester asaluniii auditors. No credit is given for 
courses taken throu^ this program, and courses will not appear 
on student transcripts. Alumni who wiA to receive credit for 
couises rrust register as nondegree students and pay tuition si 
the prevailing rate. Alumni who are silso currently enrolled in a 
degree program at AU may pwrticipate in the alumni audit op- 
tion, except in courses for ttieir degree program. Alumni audi- 
tors are expected to follow all university conduct poUcies. 

Alumni audit registration is available during the first two 
weeks of classes for the fall and s{ring semesters and only for 
courses which have not reached their enrolliiieii limits (no 
"bluecards" are issued for alumni audit registration). 

In-person registration is available at the Alurmi Programs of- 
fice. Constitution Building, Tailey Can^ws. Registrations may 
also be irailed to Alumni Programs, American University, 4400 
Massachusetts Ave. NW, Wadiington, EXZ" 20016, or faxed to 
202-885-5964. When faxing registration forms, please call 
202-885-5960 to verify receipt of the fax. 

The Alumni Audit fee is $100, which siqjports the Ahrnmi 
Sdiolarship Fund and atininistrativB costs. Some courses may 
also have additional fee& Payment will be accepted by check, 
money order, VISA, MasteiCard, Discover, and American Ex- 
press only (no cash). 

Courses not available for Alumni Audit include independent 
study or reading, private music instmction, laboratory courses, 
and maintaining roatricuktioiL 

The following schools and departments require faculty or de- 
partmental approval If appro val is required, the instructoror de- 
partment must sign the authorization section of the registraticn 
form before the student may register as an alumni auditor. 

• School of International Service (SIS), School of 
Communication (SCXT), and School of PubKc Affairs 
(SPA); all courses 

• College of Arts and Sciences (CAS): Anthropology 
(graduate-level courses). Art, Audio Technology, Health 
and Fitness, History (graduate4evel couises). Language 
and Foreign Studies, Literature (400-level and 
graduate-level courses), Psychofogy, and Sociotogy. 

For additional information, call 202-885-5960 or go to 
http[//aluniii.american.edu/ 

For availability of couises, check the Sdiedule of Classes at 
www.americaaedu/americanAegistrar/scbedule.html. 



Changes in Registration 

To make changes in registration online, log on to 
my ameri caaedu and go to ADD/DROP COURSE 
Adding Courses 

Students may add a course throu^ the second week of 
classes for the fall or spring, orthe equivalent for a summer ses- 
sion 

In addition to any course prerequisites and required authori- 
zations, ^Jjjrovals are required for flie following. 

• Students adding business courses nixst obtain approval 
from the Kogod School Undergraduate or Graduate 
F¥o gram Office. 

• Students adding coirmiunication courses must have 
approval fiom the School of Communication. 

• Coopa^tive Education students must have worked directly 
with the Career Cento- and have signed approval. 

Dropping Courses 

Students may drop a course through ttie semester midterm 
dateforthe fallorspring,ortheequivalent for a summer session. 
When a student wittidraws fiom a course during ttie first two 
wedcs of a seriKSter (or ttie equivalent for surrmerX the course 
will not appear on ttie transcript; withdrawal fliereafter is noted 
with a "W" in place of a grade. 

Note: Discontinuing attendance in class or notifying an in- 
structor ofa status change doesnot constitute anofficial action. 

Approvals are required for ttie following; 

• Withdrawal fi^m courses used to satisfy the University 
Mathematics Requirement re<piires the approval of an 
academic advisor based on the placement 
recoirmendations made by the Eteparlment of Mathematics 
and Statistics. 

• International students with F-1 or J-1 visas should consult 
first with an intanational student advisor in Intemational 
Student &ScholarServicesregardinghowto maintain their 
status. 

• Athletes must not drop below 12 credit hours without 
authorization of the director of athletes. 

• Kogod students dropping business courses mist obtain 
approval from the Kogod School Undergraduate or 
Graduate lYogram Office. 

• Cooperative Education students must have prior approval 
from file Career Center. 

Grade lype Option 

Students may change grade type options (A-F or PassT-ail) 
on ftie web through the second week of classes for the fell or 
spring, or the equivalent for a summer sessioiL 

Note: Changing grade type is not pennitted for courses that 
require a specific grade typje, such as Pass/Fail only 



44 Registration 



Withdrawal from the University 

Degree students who withdraw comfietely from the univer- 
sity must file an ofiScial Withdrawal Request Fonn though the 
Registtai's OfiBce. Students on academic probation will be re- 
quired to obtain the signature o f their academic dean before ttiey 
will be permitted to withdraw. 

Course and Schedule Information 

Course Numbers 

Each course is designated by a subject code and a course 
number. The subject code identifies a particular academic disci- 
pline or teadiing unit in the curriculum; e.g. ANTH = Anthro- 
pology; ECON = Economics; ARTH = Art History. The 
numbeiB identify the level of the course as follows; 001-099 = 
no degree o^dit; 100-499 = undergraduate degree credit; 
500-599 = ffadaste courses to which advanced undergraduate 
students may be admitted; 600-799 = graduate courses to which 
undergraduate students usually are not admitted. 

Courses taken for undergraduate Goieral Education credit 
have a 'Xj"inthe course nuitber, e.g., HIST-IOOQ 
Credit Hour Value 

All undergraduate and graduate courses aie valued in credit 
hours. GeneiaUy, each credit houris equal to 50 minutes of class 
instruction a week. 
Course Descriptions and Syllabuses 

Descriptions of permanent courses currently in the university 
curhcuhim are listed by course nuirfcerin Course Descriptions. 
Catalogcomse descriptions, as well as selected and rotating top- 
ics course descriptions are available each semester from the 
Schedule of Classes at 
www.ameiicaaedu/american/re gistrar/schedule .html 

A syUabus descnbing the general nature and scope of eadi 
ccuise is available fitim the department offering the course for 
three years. 
Course Prerequisites 

Manycoursescall fora minimum badcgroundofknowledge, 
as radicated by prerequisite courses cited in individual descrip- 
tions. Titles and numbers are those of American Univereity 
courees; equivalent courses satisfactorily completed at other ac- 
credited institutions also meet prerequisite requirements by 
transfer credit. 

Students are reqx)nsible for entering the class with the re- 
quired competence. Thus, prerequisites warn students of the 
knowledge they are to bring with them in order to meet the ex- 
pected standards of perfomxince. 
Class Periods 

Day dasses, except those cd Wednesday and Saturday, ordi- 
narily meet two days a w«ek for 75 minutes ameeting. Wednes- 
day classes ordinarily meet once a week for two horns and 30 
minutes. SomBclassesmBet&reetimesaweekfor50or60min- 



ulES a meeting. Evening classes oidinaiily meet once a week for 
two hours and 30 minutes ortwicea week for75 ninutesa meet- 
ing. Classes at the 600- and 700-level may, in some cases, meet 
for a total of two hours a week at the discretion of the teaching 
unit concerned. 

Courses involving laboratory, studio, discussicn groups, or 
workshops may vary finm these sdiedules. Independent reading 
courses, study projects, internships, and similar kinds of study 
opportunities meet according to the special arrangement with 
the school, department, or faculty merribers concerned 
Cancellation of Courses 

Occasionally it is necessary to cancel a scheduled course be- 
cause of low enrollment, the last-minute unavailability of an in- 
structor; or other unavoidable reasons. Every effort is made to 
announce the cancellation before flie first class meeting, but ttiis 
is not ahvayspossible. If a course is canceled, a student vAo does 
not choose to transfer to another course ireiy receive a full refund 
ofthe tuition and fees paid forflie canceled course by completing 
a refiind request form in the OfiSoe of Student Accounts. 
Oass Attendance 

The university considers class attendance amatter best leflto 
the discretion of ttie individual instructor. It is expected, how- 
ever, that faculty nKmbers who have a particular attendance pol- 
icy wUl announce that policy at the first few dass meetings each 
semester. 

\feterans and oftiers receiving government benefits are re- 
minded that the paying agaicy way have specific attendance 
policies 
Emergency Cancellation of Classes 

Classes at American UiivaTsity are expected to meet accord- 
ing to the announoed schedule and no instructor is authorized to 
change the day, hour, or place of any rrBeting. Unless cancdla- 
tion of classes is aimounced pubHcly, classes will meet. When 
cancellation of cksses is necessary, instructors are expected to 
arrange for additional reading, study assignments, or class meet- 
ings to compensate for attendance time lost. 

Student Responsibility 

Students are responsiHe fortheirbehavior.academicandotti- 
erwise, at American Ltaiversity. American Urriversity expects 
that students, as mature merrbers ofthe academic community, 
will adhere to the highest standards of personal and academic in- 
tegrity and good taste. 

To protect ftieir academic status, students should seekthe af>- 
propriate approval of their academic program advisors. It is 
highly recommended that students keep their own records of all 
transactions with the urriversity (grade reports, registration 
schedules and changes, inccxnplete forms, etc.). 

ft is also advisable to keep copies of all tests and pq)ers sub- 
mitted in fulfillment of course work. 



Academic Regulations 

• Academic Integrity Code 

• Student Academic Grievance Policy 



As pat of fToviding a high-quaKty edication, the university 
continuously examines its academic requirements. As a result, 
the infomBtion contained in this and other sections ofthispubli- 
cation may be revised. Students should consult ttieir deans or de- 
partment chaiis for any new requirements that may affect their 
individual programs of study. 

Academic Integrity Code 

The Academic Integrity Code for American University de- 
scribes standands for academic conduct, lights and respoisibili- 
tiesof membeis of the academic conmunity, and procedures for 
handling allegations of academic diAonesty. Academic dishon- 
esty as defined by the Ccxie includes, but isnot limited to: plagia- 
rism, inappropriate collaboration, dishonesty in examinations 
(in-dass or take-home), dishonesty in papers, work done fiw one 
course and submitted to another, deliberate falsification of data, 
interference witti other students' woric, and copyright violations. 

Violations of the Academic Integrity Code are treated seri- 
ously, with special attention to repeat ofifendeis. After a second 
determination of guih is established through formal review by a 
major teaching unit, a student will be suspended or dismissed. 

Penalties foran academic offense may include one or more of 
the following: resubmission ofthe work in question, submission 
of additional work for the course in which the offense occurred, a 
lowered grade or toss of credit for the wcric fouid to be in viola- 
tion of the Code, a failing grade of F or ZF for the course in 
which the offeose occurred, denial of aedit for fee course in 
which the o flense occuwed, suspension for one or more aca- 
demic tenns, including the term in v/hkHi the offense occurred, 
and dismissal (for a ^ecified term or permanently) fiom the uni- 
versity. A notation of some Code violatians is made on the stu- 
dent's pomanent record. 

By registering as a student at American Uiriveraity, all stu- 
dents acknowledge their awareness ofthe Academic Integrity 
Code. Students are responsible for becoming SimiUar wifli their 
ri^s andresponsibiUtiesas defined in the Codeaad are respon- 
sible for knowing the requirements for ttieir particular courses 
(regarding such issues as collaborative \M3rk, use of study aids, 
or tske-hcsne examinations). Students are responsible for learn- 



ing the conventions of documentation and acknowledgment of 
sources required in academic discourse. 
The university's Academic Integrity Code may be found in Aca- 
demic Regulation 80.00.00 at 
www, american.edu/academics'integrity/code 

Student Academic Grievance Policy 

In the course of academic hfe, a student may come into dis- 
agreement witti a faculty meiriber or wifli the pohdes and ac- 
tions of an academic unit as ttiey affect the student's progress 
toward completion of a course or degree. In cases of conplainf 
or disagreement over academic matters not resolved by consul- 
tation among the parties, the miveisity provides the student the 
right to initiate a grievance procedure. 

Students shculd have protection ttirou^ orderly pirocedures 
against prejudiced or capricious academic evaluation. At the 
same time, they are responsible for maintaining standards of ac- 
ademic performance established for each couse in which ttiey 
are enrolled. Evaluation of students and the awarding of credit 
must be based on academic perfomBnce professionally judged 
and not on matters irrelevant to that performance, such as pei^ 
sonality, physical disabihty, age, race, gender, sexual orienta- 
tion, reUgjon, national origin, degree of pohtical activism, or 
p>er9onal beUe&. 

Judgerrsnt regarding standards of evaluation for a student's 
academic performance is a fiiculty responsibiUty and is not 
grievable. Normally, onlyquestionsrelating to whether a &culty 
Tnerrl>eroom{died witti the stated requirementsof the course and 
ap>ptied standards of evaluation faiiiy and equitably are poten- 
tially grievable. Cases involving complaints about grades will be 
considered only when there is clear evidence that casts signifi- 
cant doubt on ttie objectivity ofthe grading process or indicates 
that the faculty member Med to comply with fhe stded require- 
ments ofthe course. 

The university's pohcy and procedures for consultation and 
infcnnal resolution,' formal process, and app>eal for student aca- 
demic grievances may be found in Academic Regulation 
50.00.02 at 
www. americanedu/ameiican/registrar/AcadeinicR^ 



Academic Regulations 

• student Records 

• Grading System 

• Graduation 

• Undergraduate Academic Honors 



Student Records 

A file is maintained for each sUident w4io registers at Ameri- 
can University. Degree students' recoids begin in the Admis- 
sions OflBce, whidi assemHes the appiication and snjporting 
documents and the record of admission actions. After an apph- 
cant is approved for admission and registers, the academic his- 
tory is maintained by the OfiBce of the Ltaiveisity Registrar. 
Normally the only record maintained for nondegree studaits 
who are citisens of the United States are the record of their regis- 
tration(s) and their academic performaDce. A fiill record is kept 
for each international nondegree student. 

The purpose of ttie official student record is to document the 
student's academic career and to provide a repository of infor- 
mation which can be useful to advisors. All relevant materials 
are maintained unril the student has received the degree or has 
left the university. Periodically, the basic materials in files are 
microfilmed and only ftie microfilmed copy and the electronic 
Ijamanent record, on which the summary of ftie total record is 
entered, are retained. 

hiformation needed for thecontinuingevaluationof the prog- 
ress of a student, grades earned, and the like are ixBde available 
to the dean by the University Registrar. The various colleges, 
schools, and departments also develop files to aid in the counsel- 
ing and appraisal of their own students. Such files are not, how- 
ever, to be considered ofiScial. Irrportant decisions relating to a 
student's academic career should always be based on the infor- 
mation maintained by flie OflSce of the University Registrar 

The alteration ormisuse of official student records, orattenpt 
to alteror misuse them, under any circumstances or for any pur- 
pose, will result in the peremptory dianissal of any student or 
enployee of the univeisity involved and the institution of such 
legal pnx^eedings as may be appropriate. 

Confidentiality of Student Records 

The university's poUcy and procedures for confidentiality of 
Student leconis may be found in Academic Regulation 90. 10.00 
at www.americanedu/american/regislrar/AcademicReg 



The following explains the university's policy for complying 
with the Family Educational Ri^ts and Privacy Act of 1974 
("FERPA" or "Act"). Students at American IMvereity have the 
following ri^ts regarding their education records; 1 ) tohaveac- 
cess to their education records, 2) to consent to rdease a record 
to a third party, 3)to recpiest nondisclosure ofdirectory informa- 
tion, 4) to seek amendment of infonnation in an education record 
which ttie student demonstrates is inaccurate, 5 ) to be notified of 
their privacy rights, and 6) to file conplaints with the Family 
Policy Compliance Office ofthe U.S. Department of Education 
concerning alleged failures by American University to corqply 
with the Act 

For purposes of this policy, the term "studoit" means any in- 
dividual who is attending or has attended American University 
and for whom the university maintains education records. The 
term "education records" or "studait education records" means, 
with certain exceptions, any records 1 )4iat aredirectiyrelatedto 
a student and 2) maintained by the university or its agents. Stu- 
dait education records are confidential and may only be released 
with consent ofthe student or as otherwise permitted by law. 

The university does not maintain education records in one 
central office. Education records are maintained in the various 
departments, schools, or colleges. A student should contact the 
Office of the University Registrar, or, for law students, the 
M^shington College of Law (WCL) Registrar, for guidance in 
determiningwhichum1(s) astudent ^ould contact about an edu- 
cation record 

Examples of academic and non-academic studoit education 
records include without limitation; 

• Academic Records; Permanent record of academic 
performance (e.g., transcript, including supporting 
documents) maintained by the Office of the University 
Registrar, the WCL Registrar, academic advisor, dean's 
ofiice, and Provosfs Office; files of academic progress 
maintained by the individual school/college academic 
office and Provost's Office; admission files of students; 
Career Center files. 

• Non-Academic Records; Files related to Financial Aid, 
Housing and Dining ProgranB, International Student and 



Academic Regulations 47 



Scholar Services, Student Accounts, and the Library; 

student discipline files; enployment files of students who 

are employed because of their student status (e.g. 

work-study, graduate assistantship/fellowAip). 
Only information directly relevant to the educational pro- 
cesses of the miveisity or which is voluntarily offered by the 
student and accepted from the student shall be included in stu- 
dent education records. 

Specitkally excluded from such student education records 
are: 

• Medical and mental health infcrtnation which is created, 
maintained, or used by a physician, psychiatrist, 
psychologist, or other recognized professional in 
connection with treatment of the studmt and disclosed only 
to individuals providing the treatment. Such records are 
strictly confidential and not accessible except as provided 
by applicable laws; 

• Sole possession reccs-ds or private notes maintained by 
individual faculty and instructional, supervisory, or 
administrative personnel for their own use and which are 
not accessible or released to anyone except a substitute; 

• Records created and maintained by PiAUc Safety soldy for 
law enforcement purposes, 

• Employment records of students wiiich are made and 
maintained in the normal course of business, relate 
excluavely to their employment, and are not availaUe for 
use for any other purpose; 

• Alumni records which contain only information about 
former students after they are no longer students at the 
uiivrasity. 

Student Access to Student Education Records 

Each student may inspect his or her education record, subject 
to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions A student 
must submitawrittenrequesttoreviewaneducationrecoid. The 
request will be granted as soon as possible, but no later than 
forty-Cve(45)daysfiomthedateofthereceiptoftiierequest, At 
the time of inspection, the student must present identification 
and must in^)ect the records in the presence of a designated uni- 
versity official In lieu ofinspection and at the request of fee stu- 
dent, the university may provide a cc^y of the requested 
education record. The student may be chargied for the actual 
costs of copying the records. The university reserves the right to 
deny requests for copies of records if there is an administrative 
restriction on ttie individual's student account (e.g. finandal ob- 
ligation, disciplinary stop). 

Student may not access the following education records: 

• Financial information submitted by parents; 

• Confidential letters of recomnendation for whidi a student 
has waived the right of access provided that the 
recommendations are used only for their intended purpose 
(i.e. admission, employment, or consideration for any 
honor). However, the student may know the names of all 
people making reconmendations; and 



• Confidential letters of recommendation placed in a record 
before January 1, 1975, if the letters were used only for ttje 
intended purpose 

Disclosures of Student Education Records 

The university may verify or release directory infoimation 
unless the student has filed a request for nondisclosure of direc- 
tory infonnatiMi with the Office ofthe University Registrar or, 
for law students, the WO . Registrar Prior to verifying orreleas- 
ing directory information, the university official processing the 
request rmst contact the Office of the University Registrar to en- 
sure that the student has not requested nondisclosure o f directoiy 
information. Directory information includes a student's name, 
telephone nuni)ers, addresses, e-mail addresses, date and place 
ofbirth, dates of attendance at the university, major field of study 
and class, date of graduation, degrees and honors received at the 
university, the most receiS previous educational agency or insti- 
tution attended, participation in officially recognized university 
activities, height and weight of menfcers of athletic teams, pho- 
tographs and similar inlbrmation. 

The university may verify directory information for paeons 
requesting sudi informatioiL In the evoit that the individual 
seeking verification provides inconect or incomplrte informa- 
tion, the university will not complete, conect, volunteer, or pro- 
vide additional information to the inquirer. The university, in 
connection with specific events such as ccnnmencements, dean's 
list atmouncements, scholarship presentations, athletic contests, 
or other university-related news stories, may release directory 
information to the news media or thepubHc. The university may 
release directory information for lawenibrceraent purposes, and 
will release directory information as required by law. 

Students who object to the verification and release of direc- 
tory information must notify in writing the OflSce ofthe Univer- 
sity Registrar or, for law students, the WCL Registrar. Forms for 
thisptupoee are available fixnnthe Office ofthe University Reg- 
istrar or the WCL Registrar and should be filed within thiity (30) 
days foUowing emoUmait at the univasity The request for 
nondisclosure may be rescinded by written notification to the 
Office ofthe Lfaiversity Registrar or the WCL Registrar 

Ltaiversity officials are determined to have legitimate educa- 
tional interest if the infoimation recpiested is necessary for that 
offidal to perform a task that isrelated to &eir mrmaUy assigned 
job functions or related to their performance of a contract wifli 
the university. A "uiuveisity official" includes faailty, staffs a 
meiii)eroftheboardoftiustees,third-partiesactingon behalf of 
the university, and individuals, induding students, serving on 
university committees. The determination as to whether a legiti- 
mate educational interest exists will be made by the custodian of 
the records on a case-by-case basis. 
Third-Party Access to Education Records 

The university may disclose student education records with 
the prior written consent of ttie student. A student may auSiori^e 
access to third parties to review the student's education record by 
completing a written and dated authorization form w4uch sjjeci- 



48 Academic Regulatbns 



fies the information to be released, the reasons for the release, 
and to ^^ilomthe infomBtion is to be leleased. 

The university may disclose infomiation in the following cir- 
cumstances without the prior written consent of ftie student 

• To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued 
subpoena Unless otherwise directed by ttie order or 
subpoena, the univCTsity will make a reasonable efifort to 
notify the student in writing of tiie order or subpoena in 
advance of compliance; 

• To flie parents of a depaidenl student, as defined in the 
Intemal Revenue Code. The parent must sign, and provide 
to the university, a written statement con firming ttiat the 
student is a dependait; the statemert must be accoinpanied 
by a copy of the parent's most current tax return whidi 
reports the student as a dependent; 

• To persons or organizatims providing the student financial 
aid, or who determine financial decisions concerning 
eligibility, amount, conditions, and enforoemeii or tams of 
the financial aid; 

• To organizations conducting studies for educational 
agencies to 1) develop, vahdate, or administer predictive 
tests, 2) administer studait aid prt^jams; or 3) improve 
instruction. Disclosure under this paragraph diall only be 
made if the study is conducted in a manner ttiat does not 
permit personal identification of students by individuals 
other than representatives of the organization and that 
personally identifiable data will be destroyed when no 
longer needed for the purpose for which it was collected; 

• To authorized representatives ofthe Comptroller General of 
the Lhited States, Secretary ofEducation; or state and local 
educational au&orities to audit or evaluate a federal or state 
supported education programs, or for the enfoicement of or 
compUance with legal requirements of those programs. 
Disclosure under this paragraph ^all only be made if 
infcBination is protected in a manner that does not permit 
personal identification of studoits by individuals other than 
the specified officials and that personally idenfifiaHe data 
will be destroyed when no longer needed for the purpose for 
whidi it is collected 

• To accrediting organizations for purposes related to 
accreditation of the university; 

• To appropriate parties in a health or safety emergency; 

• To victims of crinss of violence or non-forcible sex 
ofienses concerning the results of disciplinary proceedings 
about those inddents; 

• To appropriate parties as permitted by the university's 
Parental Notification of Disciplinary Violations Involving 
the Use orPossession of Alcobol oraControlled Substance; 
and 

• Toappropriatepartiesinattiercircumstaiicesasrequiredby 
law. 

Education reconls will only be discbsed to third parties if 
they are advised iMt to redisdose flie information to others with- 



out the prior written consent of the student or as pemitted by 
law. 

Each uni vanity office must maintain a Ust of all individuals 
or organizations who have obtained access to a students record 
The list must indicate the legitimate interest that each person or 
otgani2ation has in obtaining the infomBticn. This "record of 
access" is part of flie student's education record. Arecord of ac- 
cess is not necessary for disdosures: 1 ) to the student, 2) pursu- 
ant to a written authorization fiom a student, 3) to university 
officials, 4) of directory informatian, and 5) inresponse to a sub- 
poena or coifft order specifying that the existence and/or ccm- 
tents of such documents may not be revealed. 
Student's Right to Challmge iDformation in ttie 
Student Education Record 

If a student demonstrates that the student's education record is 
inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the student's 
privacy rights, the student may request in writing ttiat the record 
be changed The request should be made directly to the custo- 
dian of ttie record Any disagreerrent should be resolved infor- 
mally, if possible and within a reasoiBble time period. If the 
request is denied, 4ie student may file a written appeal within 30 
days to the Ltoiversity Registrar or, for law students, the WCL 
Registrar. The Registrar will appoint a hearing committee to re- 
view the corrplaint. The committee will provide the student a 
fuU and fair opportunity to present evidence. The student may 
be assisted or represented by one or more individuals of the stu- 
dent's choice, including an attorney. After the committee com- 
pletes the proceeding and makes findings, it will rendera written 
decision and forward it to the relevant parties for implementa- 
tion. 

Students, dissatisfied with ttie resultsof a hearing, may place 
an explanatory statemait in the rdevant education record can- 
menting upon the inforrrBtion in dispute, and'or siting forth any 
reason for disagreement wifti the institutional decision not to 
correct or amend the record. Such a statement will become part 
of the student education record. 
Inactivity of Student Education Records 

After five years since the student has graduated or was last 
registered at the university, the university geiKrally destroys stu- 
dent education records. ExceptioiB include but are not limited to 
the following permanent records of academic performance, in- 
cluding supporting documents; such financial records as are 
necessary so long as there exists a finandal obligation to ttie uni- 
versity; and disciplinary records that involve a pomanent ncte- 
tion to the student's record. 

Transcripts 

Students nay obtain transcripts of flieir academic records 
fiomttjeOflSce ofttie Registrar. Transcripts will be released only 
on the signed request or release of the student corKemed. 

The miveisity wiU not issue a transcript that reflects only a 
part ofthe student's record, nor will it make copies of transw^Jts 
on file fiomottier colleges and universities. 



Academic Regulations 49 



Certification of Enrollment 

The Office of the Regidrar supphes, on request of a currently 
enrciled student, certification of certain academic data concern- 
ing the records and status of the student. These certifications are 
used for Department of liducation and scholarship forms, em- 
ployment applications, and so forth. They are not to be confused 
with transcripts of 4ie student's pemianent academic record. 

Grading System 

Calculated in the Grade Point Average: 

Grade Quality Points 

A(Excellent) 4.0 

A- 3.7 

B+ 3.3 

B(Good) 3.0 

B- 2.7 

C+ 2.3 

C (Satisfactory) 2.0 

C- 1.7 

D(Poor) 1.0 

F^ail) 

X (adninistrative penalty)* 

•The X grade is assigned by the instructor in heu of an F 
when a student never attaided or ceased attending the class, ren- 
dering an assessment of academic performance impossible. 
Not Calculated in the Grade Point Average: 

I incomplete 

IP in progress 

(for a course for which a grade is not necessarily due at the 
end of the semestei; e.g. independent study) 

L auditor (no aedit) 

N ... no grade reported by instructcr or invalid grade 

P pass 

W withdrawal 

ZF fail on pass/fail option 

ZL administrative withdrawal from audit 

ZX ... fail (admrmstrative penalty) on pass/fail option 
Grade Point Average 

The cumulative grade point average includes only those 
couises taken for conventional grades (A through F). Courses 
below the 100-level or taken pass/fail are not included in the 
grade point average, nor are grades of Incomplete (I). See also 
Repetition of Courses, below. 

Credit accepted for transfer finm another institution is in- 
cliided in the total arcDunt of credit qjplicable to degree require- 
ments, but grades earned in such courses are not recorded on the 
perrtBnent record at American University and are not used in 
computing the cumulative grade point average needed for grad- 
uati(Hi. 
Pass/FaQ 

For undergraduate students, ibs grade of P indicates a quality 
of performance no less than C (2.00) on a conventional grading 
scale. For graduate students, the grade of P indicates perfor- 



mance equivalent to a B (3.00) or better on a conventional 
gradingscale. Performance bebw these levels is reported as ZF. 

NeilherthePgradenortheZForZX grade iscalculated in the 
grade pxsint avaage. Degree credit, however, is received with the 
grade of P. 
Incomplete Grades 

At the discretion of the faculty member, the grade of I (In- 
complete) may be given to a student who, because of extenuat- 
ing circumstances, is unable to ccanplete the couise during a 
semester. The grade of IncomjJete may be given only if flie stu- 
dent is receiving a passing grade for the course work completed. 
Arrangements for a grade of hconplete must be made in ad- 
vance of fee final examinatioa An Incompl^e Contract form 
detailing what work is to be submitted, the deadlines for such 
submission, and a ^de to be substituted for the 1 shouM sub- 
mission deadlines not be met is signed by bofe the student and 
the fecuhy merDber. The submission deadline ^ould not extend 
beyond the last day of the following semester (not counting sum- 
mer). 

No grade ofl willbe recogni^dbythe OfiSceofthe Registrar 
without the pHoper documentation. On conviction of fee re- 
quirements of the course wifein the time spedfied in the elec- 
tronic submission of fee Incomplete, the grade of I mist be 
resolved to a grade of A ftirough F, P, or ZF. Unless resolved by 
the faculty member to one of feese grades, fee default grade 
specified in fee electronic subnissian of fee Incomplete will be 
inserted as a final grade inplaoe of the I by fee Office o f the Reg- 
istrar. A Wmay not be given to remove a grade of 1. An Imay not 
stand as a permanent grade. 
Changes in Grades 

Once repwrted, a grade may not be changed except to remove 
a grade ofl (Incomplete) as stated above, or to correct a grade re- 
corded in error To remove a grade recorded incorrectly, fee fac- 
ultymeiit)erTnist certifyin writingto the Office offee Registrar 
that an ertox was made. 
Repetition of Courses 

Whenever a course is repeated, each attempit, including fee fi- 
nal grade, is eiiered separately on fee p>ennanent acadenic re- 
cord. Unless q)ecifically indicated to fee contrary, howeva-, 
only one success fulattenpt of a course is counted toward fiilfiU- 
ment of graduation credit requirenEnts. Wife fee excepition of 
the Freshman Foipveness rule (see fee Undergraduate Study 
chapter in this publication), fee grades received in all attempts 
are considered in the computation of fee undergraduate canula- 
tive grade pwint average. 

Graduation 

Candidates for devices sutnit an Ap>plicatian for Graduation 
formto the Office offee Registrar during fee registration period 
forfeeir last expiectedtermof study. Apjphcation forms are avail- 
able at: www.anierican.edu/amer i can/ reg is1raiygrad . 

Only after appUcation for graduation has been made can fee 
Office offee Registrar begin processing fee necessary informa- 



50 Academic Regulations 



tioD for final certification of graduatioD. Students who fail to 

complete all degree requiremenls by the end of the term for 

which ftiey applied to graduate must reapply in order to graduate 

later. 

Conferral of Degrees and Commencement 

The university confers degrees and issues diplomas at the end 
of the fell, paring, and summer terms. Formal commencemsnl 
ceremonies are held in May. 

Only studaits who successfiilly conplete degree require- 
ments by the end of the term for wiiich they have apphed (orre- 
applied) to graduate are certified for conferral of a degree. In 
witness of the degree conferred, the pemianent records of the 
graduates are appropriately noted with a statonent of graduation 
and their diplomas are released. 

Candidates for degrees whose academic records indicate that 
they can satisfy degree requirements by the end of the term for 
which Ihey have applied are pemiitted to participate in com- 
mencenent cerenunies Participation in a commencement cere- 
nuny does not itself constitute conferral of a degree, nor does it 
imply an obligation on the part of the university to award a de- 
gree before all requirements have been met and certified. 

Undergraduate Academic Honors 

Dean's List 

Each college or school may issue a dean's list of its undCT- 
graduate honor students at the end of each semester. The mini- 
mim standard for Usting is a 3.50 grade point average for the 
sonester, eamed in a fiill-time undergraduate program of not 
fewer than 15 conpleted credit hours of whidi at least 12 hours 
rmst be coirpleted for A-F grade credit. 
Graduation Honors 

Undergraduate graduation honors at American Univeisity 
include LatinHonors, basedon cumulative grade pointaverage, 
and University Honors, based on a combination of honors 
course options, cumulative grade point average, and conpletion 
of an honors capstone. To be eUgiUe for graduation honors, stu- 
daits rmst have conpleted at least 60 credit houis required for 
their degree in residence at American University and have 
achieved the requisite grade point average. Both Latin Honors 
and University Honors are listed in the oommencementprogram 
and on the student's diploma and permanent record. 
Latin Honors 

Undergraduate Latin Honors andthe grade point averages re- 
quired are as follows: 

summa cum laude: 3.90 or hi^er 
magna cum laude: 3.70 through 3.89 
cum laude: 3.50 through 3.69 



No more than 1 5 credit hours taken Pass'Fail may be induded in 
American University woric apphed toward L^dn Honors. Courses 
taken Pass/Fail are not compiled in the grade point average. 
University Honors Program 

The Ltaiveisity Honors Program is a comprehensive program 
ofhonors options drawn fixjmthe General Education cunicuhan 
and departmental coinse offerings to qualified undeiTgraduate 
students. The program is characterized by small seminars, indi- 
viduahzed attention from faculty, unique access to the resources 
of Wadiington, DC, and the special atmo^here of an honors 
community of committed faculty and ^dents. 

Qualified entering fieshmai, transfer students, and current 
students are ehgible for admission to the pwDgram. Entering 
fieshmen are admitted to the program based upon excellence in 
their hi^ school academic performance. Other students, includ- 
ing transfers, maybe admitted to tiie program at the disaetion of 
the honors director if they have achieved a cunulative grade 
point average (GPA) of3.60 for the equivalent of at least one ac- 
ademic year (30 credit hours). 

Students entering the program as fieshmai are required to 
complete a mininmn of 30 credit houis ofhonors course work 
with a grade of B or better in each honors course and a cumula- 
tivB GPA of 3.50 or above. Honors students take 12 to 18 credit 
hours of foundation-level work from honors sections ofEnglish, 
statistics, Gaieral Education, or defartmental courses. Six to 1 2 
credit hours of advanced level (3 00 or above) specialized honors 
woric is drawn from honors sections of major or major-related 
courses, honors sipplements linked to courses in the mqor one - 
lated fields. University Honors coUoquia, and honors independ- 
ent study. All University Honors students must conplete an 
honors senior capstone project (3 to 6 aedit houis). 

Students who enter the University Honors Program after the 
freshman year are not required to complete ttie fiill 30 hours of 
honors course woi. Exceptions to the number of required hours 
are determined by the program director and subtracted fiomthe 
foundation-level lequirements. 

All University Honors students are requied to meet with 
their Honors counselor for advisanent before registering each 
semester. 

Students who fiilfiU the requiremenls for the University 
Honors Program are eligible to graduate with University 
Honors University Honors Program studaits \viiose honors 
work includes completion of 12 hours of advanced-level honors 
work in the major (which itBy indude senior capstone credits) 
will, with departmental recommendation, graduate with Univer- 
sity Honors in the Major. Formore information contact the Uni- 
versity Honors Programat 202-885-6194. 



Academic Regulations 

• Graduate Academic Standards and 
Degree Requirements 



It is university policy ttiat no student shall be involuntarily 
subjected to regulations and academic requirements introduced 
during the student's continuous enrolhnent in good standing in a 
singje degree program if the new regulations involve undue 
hardships or loss of academic credits earned to satisfy the re- 
quirements previously in effect. 

Graduate students are governed by the following minimum 
reqinrements for the graduate degree. Each teaching unit may 
have furttier requirements Graduate students are advised to con- 
sult their own advisor, department diair, or dean for detailed in- 
formation. 

Academic Load and Full-Time Status 

The normal load of full-time graduate study is 9 to 12 credit 
hours a semester; however, an academic unit may declare cir- 
cumstances under which fijll-time involvement in ttiesisor dis- 
sertation research constitutes fiill-time standing. 

In summer sessions, because o f the conbination of six-week 
and seven-week sessions, there are various possibilities for 
full-time standing. Usually, registration Ibr 6 credit hoursduring 
any session is considered fiill-time. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 

A graduate student who fails to maintain a 3.00 grade point 
average (on a 4.00 scale) after completion ofttie first 12 credit 
hours of gradtate study may be placed on academic probation 
for one semester, after which the student mist achieve andmain- 
tain a 3 00 avwage or be dismissed. A graduate student nay be 
placed on academic probation only once. It should be noted that 
the grade point average is only one measure of acadanic perfor- 
mance. Maintenance of the required average does not necessar- 
ily irrply that a student is making satisfactory progress, and the 
university reserves the right to dismiss a studeat whose perfor- 
mance is judged unsatisfactory even though the studoit has 
maintained the required grade point average. A student who is 
dismissed may not be readmitted to the univeisity or enroll as a 
nondegree student for a fiill >ear after the effective date of the 
dismissal 



Advancement to Candidacy 

Each academic unit may at its discretion require a formal ad- 
vancement to cjindidacy eind deteimine the lature of fee ad- 
vancement piDcedure it will use 

Credit Hour and Residence Requirements 

Master's Degrees 

At least 30 credit hours of graduate work inchiding(a) no less 
than 3 and no more than 6 credit hours of re search resulting in a 
theas (thesis option) or (b) 6 credit hours of graduate work witti 
gradesofB or better in volvingacasestudy,an in-service project, 
an original creative work, specified research courses, or sucfa 
other effort as the academic unit may designate (nonthesis op- 
tion). 

At least 24 of these hours, including ttie thesis or nonthesis 
option, mist be coirpleted in residence at American University 
Up to 1 2 credit hours taken in nondegree status at American Uni- 
veraty may be counted toward the degree, or up to 21 credit 
hours if earned in a completed graduate certificate program 

Graduate students may countamaximumof6 credit hoursof 
internship and cooperative education Geld experiaice toward 
their degree requirements The field experience credit hours that 
may be counted toward the requirements for a degree program 
may be fewer, as determined by the academic department, but 
may not exceed the inaximumof 6 credit hours. 

Graduate students may take graduate-level courses that meet 
with undergiaduate-level courses. However, no more than 50 
percent of course work taken in residence (not counting thesis or 
dissertation seminars without regular meetings) may be taken in 
joint graduate-undergraduate courses. 
Doctoral Deg;ree$ 

For students admitted to graduate vjoik at American Univer- 
sity without a previously earned rtBster's degxe, the require- 
ment is 72credit hours of graduate study trKluding no fewer than 
6 and no rtcre tfian 24 hours o fdirected study cd the disseitatioa 
At least 42 of these hours, induding the research requirement, 
must be completed in residence at American University. Up to 
1 2 credit hours takai in nondegree status at American Univer- 
sity may be counted toward flie degree, or vp to 21 hours if 
earned in a conpleted certificate program Course credit eamed 



52 Academic Regulatbns 



toward a master's degree at American University may, irrele- 
vant, be counted towaid the FTiX). degree. 

For students admitted with a master's degree earned previ- 
ously, toe requirement is at least 42 credit hours of additional 
graduate work, of which 36 hours, including the research re- 
quirement, trust be completed in residence at AmaicanUniwr- 
sity. 

Graduate students may count amaximim of 6credit ho ursof 
internship and cooperative education field experience toward 
their degree requiremeils. The field experience credit hours toat 
nay be counted toward the requirements for a degree program 
may be fewer, as detennined by the academic dqjartment, but 
may not exceed the maximum of 6 credit hours. 

Graduate students may take gradiate-level courses that meet 
with undergraduate-level courses. Howevei; no more than 50 
percent of course work taken in residence(notcountingthesis or 
dissertation seminars without regular meetings) may be taken in 
joint graduate-undergraduate courses. 
All But Dissertation Master's 

Students who enter a doctoral programwithout amaster's de- 
gree may be awarded the appropriate rtBSter's degree by Ameri- 
can University in the field in which their doctoral work is being 
done ^^^len they have completed all requirements for the doctor- 
ate except the dissertation. 

Combined Bachelor's and Master's 
Degrees 

A student admitted to a combined bachelor's/uBSta's pro- 
gram (involving tentative admission to graduate standing, so 
that boto a bachelor's aixl master's degree may be earned as the 
result of a planned program of studies during the junior, senior, 
and first graduate year) must follow a prescribed program of 
work, and the student'srecord inust show which courses will be 
applied toward the under^graduate degree and which coirses will 
be applied toward the master's degree 

Once admitted to a combined bachelor'a'nBSter's program, a 
student rtiay not be denied entry into that master's program iftoat 
student con^Jetes the bachelor's program in good standing and 
meets university and teaching unit minimum standards for ad- 
mission to the master's program involved. 

Students will be admitted to the corribined program at two 
levels, once for the imda'graduate degree and once for the gradu- 
ate degree. Tuitionandfees will bepaidonthebasisofthe level 
at wiiich the student is currently registered. When toe student has 
completed the requirements for a bachelor's degree andbas been 
admitted to the graduate portion of the program, tuition and fees 
will be chai^ged at toe ^aduate rate. 

Undergraduate students may corrplete up to 6 graduate credit 
hours which may be appUed to the requirements for boto degree 
programs. (This assumes a graduate degree requirement of up to 
36 credit hours. In graduate programs with greaterrequirements, 
the nunber of credits applicable to both degrees may be in- 
creased). 



Students are required to corrpl^e the graduation application 
and clearance process once for the bachelor's degree and once 
fcT toe master's degree. 

Examinations 

Master's Degrees 

At least one comprdiensive examination, ttie nature and 
scope of which are determined by toe acadenic unit, is required. 

An oral examination on the toesis may be required by toe aca- 
demic unit. 
Doctoral Degrees 

At least four comprehensive examinations are required, at 
least one of wiiich must be oral. At least two of the corrprehen- 
sive examinations must be written and mist be taken within one 
year following toe completion of the residence requirement A 
qualifying examination andmasta-'s comprehensive examina- 
tion, if taken at American Ltaiversity, nay, at the discretion of 
the academic unit, be credited toward the comprehensive re- 
quirements for a doctoral degree. Comprehensive examinations 
given by other institutions will not be credited toward toe satis- 
faction of degree requirements. 

An oral examination on the dissertatian is also required. 
Examination Timetable 

For both rrBSter's and doctoral degree students, the dean or 
departrrsnt chair (or designated representative) detemines the 
time and eligibility for taking the comprrfiensive, tool, and 
(wtoere required) oral examinations. 

Application to take comprehensive examinations is made to 
the academic unit on a standard form availaUe firm that office. 
After ^iproval is obtained, toe student pays toe appropriate fee 
to Student Accounts. In most cases, students should plan to ap- 
ply during the first week of classesof the semester in wtiich they 
plan to take toe examimtions. 
Examination Fields 

Each college, school, or department offers its current list of 
standard comprehensive examination fields^ including certain 
"core" fields and areas in which candidates in particular degree 
programs must present toemsel ves for examination In some dis- 
ciplines it may be possible to choose an available field outside 
the major area of study 

Examination Grading 

Usually each corr^irdiensive written exaninaticn is read by 
t\M) readers and is rat ed"distinction," "satisfactory," or "unsatis- 
factory" by each, h order to pass toe examination, the candidate 
mist obtain at least "satisfactory" fiom both readers in eadi of 
the examination fields. In the event of a disagreement in toe rat- 
ings between readers as to wlietoer or iK>t the cai]didate should 
pass, a toird reader is appointed to break the deetdlock. Efich dean 
or department chair may, however; elect to determine a different 
system of grading coirprehensive examinations. Studoits 
should consult the spedfic college, school, or department to as- 
cotain wtoat system is used. 



Re-esamination 

Comprehensive Examination: A student vviio &ils a com- 
prehensive examination (other than a qualifying examination) 
may be permitted additional attempts within two years. The na- 
ture and extent of the examination to be retaken and the number 
of retakes allowed will be detemiined by the academic unit. 
Teaching units may establish their own rules for retaking quah- 
fying examinations. 

Thesis and Dissertation Oral Elxammations: In the event 
of failure to complete the oral examinaticn satisfactorily, the ac- 
ademic unit may, at its discretion, permit one retake. 

Grade Point Average 

Students enrolled in a graduate program must maintain a cu- 
mulative grade point average of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) in 
order to remain in good standing and to graduate. The calcula- 
tionof the graduate cumulative grade point average is specific to 
the program in whidi a student is enrolled. Only graduate-level 
American University courses that are accepted by the de- 
gree-conferring teaching unit as tulfiUing degree requirwnents 
are included in the cumulative grade point avaBge. 
Minimum C^des 

No degree credit is earned by a graduate student for any grade 
lower than C (2.00 on a 4.00 scale) received in a graduate-level 
couree. However, grades towerthanC are used in cakulating tte 
grade point average. 
Pra-equisite Undergraduate Credit 

Credit earned in undergraduate courses taken as required pre- 
requisites for other courses by graduate students may not be 
counted toward satisfying the total credit requirement for a grad- 
uate degree, and grades earned in such courses are not used in 
calculating the student's grade poiri average. 

Interdisciplinary Studies 

Graduate students who want to pirsue an MA. orM.S. inter- 
disciplinary degree niist first be adnitted to a school or college. 
In applying for admission, the prospective graduate studeiA 
should alert the faculty of the teaching unit ofhis or her interdis- 
ciplinary goals The inifiati ve in fomulating an inteidisciplinary 
major is left to the studert. The student is responsible for secur- 
ing tile advice and approval of three faculty advisors, at least orB 
fiomeachofthe two ormore disciplines involved in the interdis- 
ciplinary field, who will help in setting up ttie program. The stu- 
dent should select one of the three faculty advisors as the 
primary advisor who must be fix)m the adrritting school. Tte 
student, with the assistance ofthe faculty advisors, nust formu- 
late in writing and submit to the office ofthe dean the foUowing 
items in ttie approved format and bearing the signatures of all 
three faculty members; 



Academic Regulations S3 

1 A statement ofthe central concept around which the iiierdis- 
ciplinary major is organized. 

2. An explanation of why existing progisnis are iiadequate to 
the student's purpose 

3 . A list of all proposed courses — major, related, and tool — ^witii 
prerequisites to these courses Individually designed courses 
must be outlined by the student, afta- consultation with the fac- 
ulty merrber 

4. Arationale for the selection of coursea 

5. The title of each standardized conprehensive fieU, with a ra- 
tionale for selecting it. 

6. A statement of how ttie 64»ur research requirement is to be 
fiilfilled. If ttie research requirement is not to be met by a thesis, 
spedficsofthenonfliesis option must be listed. If the choice is to 
write a thesis, file thesis proposal andnan£s ofthesiscomnittee 
merr±)ers muS be specified. 

7 . The title o f the interdisdpUnary programand wheflier an M . A 
or MLS. degree is to be awarded upon suooessfiil completion of 
the program. 

Ameeting ofaD three faculty advisors, the student, anda rep- 
resentative ofthe dean's office must be held before final ap- 
proval ofthe major prograni Approval or disapproval of an 
interdisciplinary major will be given by the dean 's ofilce within 
four weeks of receiving the proposal. In accepting the proposal, 
the dean's ofBoe certifies that tie rules established for interdisci- 
plinary studies have been followed and that courses neoessaiy 
for comjietion ofthe program will be available, and it assumes 
administrative responsibihty for monitoring the student's prog- 
ress and clearing the student for graduation. 

Leave of Absence 

If a student is unable to pursue course work or to work with 
faculty for a fell or spring semesto-, the dean of ttie student's 
teaching unit rray authorize a leave of absence for one or two se- 
mesters, during which the student's enroOmeii status in ttie de- 
gree program would be maintained. During a leave of absence, 
the student is not entitled to use the services of the university 
Tine lirntatiQns for cortpleting graduate degrees continue to 
apply during periods when student are on leaves of absence. 
Students may petition for an extension of candidacy at ttie time 
they apply for a leave or at a later time . Procedures for granting 
leaves of absence may vary among schools and colleges 

Agraduate student taking a leave of absence because ofmili- 
tary or government assignment required as a direct result of hos- 
tilities or wai; or for incarceration resulting fiom refusal to 
accq)t induction under such cjrcumstanoes, rrBy receive a tui- 
tion refund and have ottier charges prorated on the basis of tto 
nunijer of weeks during which ttie student was registered for 
classes ina given senestw. If astudait has completed at least ten 
weeks of a session, he or she may be given fhll credit for any 
course, subject to the approval ofthe instructor and department 
chair. Additional work rtBy be required. No tuition reflinJ will 
be given for courses for which credit was given. 



54 Acadenic Regulations 



A student whose studies are interrupted for the reasons stated 
abovemay resume study at American Ltaiveisity in the same de- 
gree pnsgram, provided he or she returns within a period of six 
months followin g the completion of dutie s and provided that the 
degree program in which the student was enrolled is still offered. 
A student who wishes to be enrolled in a different degree pro- 
gram mist ^)ply for readmissioa 

Maintaining Matriculation 

Graduate students whose degree requirements are not com- 
pleted and who have not beai granted a leave of absence mist 
register each fall and sping semester during regular registration 
paiods for courses, for thesis or dissertation seminais, or for 
maintaining matriculatbn. Those who do not will be consides^d 
as having withdrawn. Such students may then reapply and, if re- 
admitted, are govemedby requirements and regulations in effect 
at the time of readrrrission. 

During a semester when a student is not enrolled in credit 
cairse work but isutilizing the seivicesof the university (e.g., to 
prepare for comprehensive examinatioDS or complete research 
for the thesisor dissertation), the student maintains enrolled sta- 
tus by registering for maintaining matriculation, the equivalent 
of one graduate-level credit hour. Schools and departments nay 
estabU^ specific requirements as to when and forhow many se- 
mesters students nay be in maintaining matriculation status 

Students who change degree objective, college, or schod, 
whose candidacy for an advanced degree expires, or who choose 
to conform to new regiilations or reqiurements must be prepared 
to conplete all requirements and abide by all regulations in ef- 
fect at flie tine such a diange is made. 

Statute of Limitations 

Candidates for a master 's degree must complete all degree re - 
quirements no later ttian three years after the date of first enroll- 
ment in the degree program. Candidates forthe doctoral degree 
mist con^lete aU degree requirements no later than five years 
after the date of first enrollment in the doctoral program, or 
seven years if the doctoral program was entwed directly from a 
bachelor's degree. 

A student may petition for an extension of candidacy in a de- 
gree program for a limited period if such extension is sought be- 
fore these time hmits e^qiire. In no case may the total amount of 
time granted in extensions of candidacy exceed fliree years. If, 
howeva; the time limit has expired, a studentmay seekreadmis- 
sion to the university for a period of no more than three years, 
less any time granted in previous exteiBions of candidacy. 

Readmission to an advanced degree program may involve 
completing additional courses or other appnapriate work. Any 
degree calling foradditionfil undergraduate prerequisite comses 
has the statute of limitations extended for the amount of time re- 
quired to conplete them 



Study at Another Institution 

A graduate student, witti the advitie and counsel of ttie stu- 
dent's acadanic unit, may be able to take a graduate coiffse 
available only at a nonconsortium institution. The student mist 
secure advance ^ipro val in writing from his or her advisor and 
dean for specific courses. The student must conform to regula- 
tions governing the maintenance of matriculation at American 
University during each fall and spring semester, and must satisfy 
the residence requiremmt of the university. 

Grades fortransferredcouisesarenotrecotdedonttieAmeri- 
caQ University permanent record or computed in the student's 
grade point average. 

Theses and Dissertations 

Thesis and Nonthesis Options 

For master's candidates, the thesis is expected to demonstrate 
the student's capacity to do original, indqiendent research. 
Some colleges, schools, and departments offer the opportunity 
to substitute a case study, an in-service project, an cjriginal cre- 
ative work, cr specific advanced research courses in heu of a the- 
sis. In each such case, the thesis seminar or other accepted 
alternative mist be conadered part of the residence requirenent 
for the master's degree and mist meet the standanls of the indi- 
vidual college, school, and department as well as those of the 
university. 

No acadenic credit is gjivea fbrdie master's thesis unless the 
student registers for the thesis seminar. However, a student 
should not enroll for this seminar until leady to start work on the 
formal thesis proposal or the thesis itself Traditionally, an advi- 
sory committee is appointed for each candidate working on a 
thesis. The committee may be corrposed of no fewer ttian two 
members, at least one of whom must be a member of the 
full-time faculty. An oral examination by thiscommittee is often 
required. Suggestions for revision may be nude as conditions 
that must be met before members will sign the title page of the 
thesis. If the chair of the thesis committee or the department 
chair catifies faihne to complete a satisfactory Ihesis, the stu- 
dent may be dismissed from the university. 

A student who writes a thesis must adhere to the required 
form and content for the proposal and to the other jroceduresde- 
scribed in detail in the published guides that may be obtained 
from the ofiSce of the dean of the college or school. 

Students electing the nonthesis option should consult the in- 
dividual program descriptions and obtain specific depiartmental 
requirements fiomtheirteacfaing units. The univeisity miniiiiim 
requirement is two research-oriented comses. These courses 
mist be conpleted wifli grades of B or better. 
Dissertation 

Capping the requirements for the doctorate is the dissertation, 
together with the lequired oral examination ofttie dissertation by 
the student's teaching imit. Nomally, the candidate nust have 
completed aD other academic requirements for the degree before 
the oral exanination can be held. 



Academic Regulations SS 



Acandidate who is declared ready to proceed to the diserla- 
tion must submit a dissertation topic proposal reporting the re- 
sults of preliminary research This proposal should contain, 
among oftier things, a concise statement of the major problem of 
research and of related supporting problems, the data to be used, 
a selected bibliography, a statement of the probable value or im- 
portance of the study, a brief description of the methods to be 
used, and a preliminary oullineofthedissatation in some detail 

After approval of the propwsal by the candidate's advisor, it is 
presented to the dean of tfie college or sdxxil £ir final approval. 
Acceptance of the proposd indicates that the topic is a suitaUe one 
and tiiat the dissertation will be accepted if developed adequately 
by ttie candidate. The university will take responsibility for direct- 
ing lesearcli only in fields and problem areas that its faculty mem- 
bers feel oorr^Ktent to handle. Acceptance of a dissalation topic 
proposal unde* no circumstance commits any department or 
school or the university to accept the dissertaticn itself 

A dissertation advisory committee of three to five persons is 
usually efipointed by the candidate's academic dean for each 
candidate undertaking a dissertation. After the draft manuscript 
has received the tentative approval of all menijers of the com- 
mittee, the comnittee chair an'anges for the oral examinatioa 
This covers tiie dissertation itself and the general field of study. 
Conditions to be me* before final acceptance of the dissertation 
may be ^cified without necessarily hoMing a second oral ex- 
amination. 
Thesis or Dissertation Progress 

It is the collective responsibility of the student, the student's 
advisor, and ftie student's conmittee to aisure that satisfectory 
progress is being nede on the student's ftiesis or dissertation. 
The student may request, at least once each semester, that the 
committee meet with him or her to discuss progress. 
Final Manuscript 

Candidates are responable for being familia- with and com- 
plying with the regulatioiB concerning the form and preparation 
of the final manuscript, abstract, copyri^t, and so forth, which 
may be obtained finm the dean or departiiBnt chair of the teach- 
ing unit offering the doctorate. Deadlines are published in the 
Academic Calendar These must be met if a candidate expects to 
receive a degree at the appropriate commenceroent 
Filing of Thesis or Dissertation 

On conpleticn of flie final maausraipt, a studed obtains te ag- 
nature ofte department chair end dean onftie ThesisDissertation 
Conpleticn foim, and takes the form and fee maniscipt to Shadert 
Accounts to pe^ ftie fee. Ihis fee is required for entering into the 
mandatory agreemed with Uniwrsity MiaofilmsL E vay thesis and 
dissertaticn wu^ be microfilmed. The student then proceeds to the 
Office offte Regjstra' for certification of fee oonpletiDn of degree 
requirements, and fcen to the library for filing of the manuscript 
This procedure is to be folbwed after all ottier requirements for the 
degree have been satisfied 



Publication 

It is the poUcy of the university to encourage publication of 
dissertations, case studies, and theses, with acknowledgment to 
the univeisity. If substantial alterations are made before pubhca- 
tion, this feet mist be noted in the paefatcry statement that gives 
acknowledgment. 

Tools of Research 

Each academic unit specifies the tcxil of research require- 
ment. Tools should relate to research in the student's discipline. 
The student 's satisfaction of tool recjuirements is certified by the 
teaching unit, but aid in ascertaining this may be sought outside 
the unit. 

Transfer of Credit 

The university is liberal in accepting credit earned in the past 
Nonetheless, a student who has not been engaged in formal 
study for a nuiil)er of years or whose study has been intermit- 
tenl, at American Univetsty or elsewhere, must understand that 
fiill credit will not necessarily be granted for past vroik simply 
because it is a matter of record. 

The evaluation of graduate woik completed elsewhere by an 
entering graduate student, in terms of its j|)pUcabUity to the pro- 
gram at American University, will be made by the office of the 
dean or department diairconcanedno later than the com^etion 
of 12 credit hours of course work at Anerican University. 

Up to 6 credit hours eamed at another institution may be ap- 
pUed to a master's degree. Up to 36 credit hours eamed at an- 
other institution may be applied to a doctoral degree, including 
30 credit hours for amaster'sdegree eamed at another inslituticm 
and 6 credit hours beyond the master's degree. 

For transfer credit, individual comses (that is, coursesnot part 
of a completed master's program) must have been cximpleted 
with grades ofB or better and must have been coirqJeted within 
seven years ofthe beginning of the semester for which the stu- 
dent is admitted to degree status at American University. In no 
case may graduate credit be given for course work designated as 
undergraduate by the offering institution. 

See also Credit Hour and Residence Requirements, or 
consult the individual d^Hrtment for finther detaUa 
Transfer of Credit from One American Univo'sity 
Advanced Degree to Another 

A student may transfer 6 credit hours fitim one master's de- 
gree eamed at American University to another master's degree 
to be completed at American University (see the dual naster's 
degrees option, below, for two master's degrees eamed simulta- 
neously). A student pursuing a second doctoral degree at Ameri- 
can University may transfer a total of 36 credit hours fiom one 
doctoral degree to another. However, the student must complete 
an additional 36 credit hours of graduate woric in residence in 
that new doctoral degree pirogram. 



56 Academic Regulations 



hi all cases students are required to meet the residaicy le- 
quirements established by the univeisity and any fuifter resi- 
dency lequiiements which may be stipulated for each program 
by the individual departments. 
Dual Master's Degrees Option 

In the case of sinultaneousa/:pravec/registration in two mas- 
ter's degree programs, additional courses may be counted to- 
ward both degrees The student must meet the admission criteria 
for each of the degrees and mist be admitted separately to each 
d^ree program. The student must be admitted to the second 
program before completing the first. Admission to one degree 
jXDgram does not guarantee automatic adnission to a second; 
each admission decision is separate and conducted according to 
estabUAed procedures for the particular degree. 

All the course and other requirements for each degree pto- 
gram mist be met, induding the thesis or rx>n-tfaesis research 



option for each degree. Students mist complete at least 48 credit 
hours in residence at American Univeraty with at least 24 cred- 
its unique to each degree. Individual departmental requirements 
riBy demand more than 24 credit hours for either or both de- 
grees. Courses used to satisfy reqinrements for an undergraduate 
d^ree may not also be used to satisfy requirements for dual 
master's degrees. 

The detailsof a student's dual master's degrees program nwst 
be approved by the department chair/degree program director 
and the dean or designee for each of the two degrees. Caididates 
for dual master's degrees must submit a formal petition to thedi- 
rectorsofeadimaster'sprogram before the conferral date ofthe 
first degree. Students apply for and receive each degree upon 
compldion of all the requirements for that degree. The degrees 
nay or may not be completed similtaneously. 



Academic Regulations 

• Undergraduate Academic Standards and 
Degree Requirements 

• Undergraduate University Degree 
Requirements 



Academic Load 

An undergraduate student admitted to and enrolled in a de- 
gree program usuedly registers for 1 5 credit hours each semester 
so that the required miniirum of 1 20 credit hours for the bache- 
lor's degree is completed in fcwr years. 

In any given semester, a student iiBy carry aminiminnof 12 
credit hours and be classified and certified (for veteran's bene- 
fits, finaocial aid, etc.) as full-time for that semester. The addi- 
tional credit hours nust be made up through summer enrollment 
or by an overload (if approved by the dean) in another sanester 
in order to maintain normal annual progress toward the degree, 
as is often required by the regulations of go vemment agencies. 
Students are urged to become familiar with such regulations. A 
total of 19 credit hours is the maxinum bad permitted without 
special approval. 

An undergraduate student wishing to regista- for more than 
1 9 credit hours in a semester is required to have the approval of 
the academic advisor and the qjpropriate dean. The apjuoval is 
for the overload, not permission for a specific course. A 
per-CTedit-hourtuition fee is assessed, in addition to the fitll-timB 
tuitbn fee, for registered credit hours over seventeen. 

Academic Probation and Dismissal 

An undergraduate student who fails to maintain ttie academic 
average requited by the uni versify and/or fails to make satisfac- 
tory progress toward a degree is subject to dianissal. A student 
who does not fulfill these criteria but who gives evidence of 
probable substantial improverrent may, under certain circum- 
stances and the discretion of the student's dean, be {daced on ac- 
ademic probation for a specified poiod of tinB in beu of being 
dismissed 

An undergraduate studait who fails to maintain a 200 cumu- 
latiw grade point average (GPA) during the first semester of 
full-time study (or the equivaloit in part-time study) is subject to 
academic probation or dismissal. A student whose cumulative 
OPA after attenpting or completing 24 credit hours (exduding 
courses in which the recorded grade is W) falls below 1 .00 will 



be dismissed. A student wdiose cumilative GPA is at any time 
between 1 .00 and 2.00 iray be dismissed or, at the discretion of 
the student's dean, placed on academic probatioa 

Astudoit onprobalionmay be subject to restrictions as to the 
course load for which he or she may register and is ineUgible to 
hold office in student orgpnizafions or to participate in intercol- 
legiate activities. The student may be givoi peimissian to partic- 
ipate in intercollegiate athletics at the end of a semester in which 
the student's cumulative GPA is raised to 2.00, even though the 
student's probation may extend for an additional semester. With 
permission of the studeri's dean, a student may complete the 
season ofany collegiate sport in which he or she is participating 
at the time the studait's cumulative GPA falls below 2.00. 

Probationary and dismissal actions are made by ttie colleges 
and school eadi January, June, and August based on the stu- 
dent's academic performance. Students on academic probation 
are informed in writing of tiieir status, the period of probation, 
and any conditions imposed by the student's dean. 

A student who is dismissed may not be readmitted to the uni- 
veraty or enroll as a nondegree student for a Ml c:alendar year 
after the effective date of the dismissal. 

Actions involving academic probation and dismissal are en- 
tered on the dudent's permanent record and may not be re- 
moved. 

Changes in Field of Study 

Astudent who widies to change fromone college or school to 
another, or from one major to another, must receive the permis- 
sionof the dean or department chair in charge of the program to 
which the student wishes to tiansfer. A change in college, school, 
or major afiiliation, when apptoved, may not become effective 
until the beginning of the next semester. It does not became ef- 
fective if ttie student is suspended or dismissed. A student who 
changes a field of study rtsiy lose credit already eamed in other 
study that is not appropriate to the new progranL 



58 Academic Regulations 



Class Standing 

Undergraduate dass standing is defined as follows: 



Credit Hours 
Completed 



Standing 



0-29 

30-59 

60-89 

90 or above 



Fiedunan 

SophonoDre 

Junior 

Senior 



It is univeisity policy that no student shall be involuntarily 
sii)ject to regulations and acadanic lequiiements introduced 
during the student's continuous enrollment in good standing in a 
single degree program if the new regulations involve undue 
hardsh^ orthe loss of academic credits earned to satisfy the re- 
quiremsnts previously in effect. 

Undagraduate students are governed by the folk wing mini- 
man requirements for the undergraduate degree (each teaching 
unit may have further major and major-related requirements). 
Undergraduate students are advised to consult their own advisor, 
department chair, or dean for detailed inforriBtion. 

Credit Hour and Residence Requirements 

Associate Degree 

The Associate in Arts degree requires the completioD of at 
least 60 credit hours. At least 24 of the last 30 credit hours ap- 
plied to the degree must be taken in residence at American Uni- 
vasity. A maximum o f 36 credit hours may be transferred to the 
degree. 

Studoits nust oompkte at least 24 hours of courses in file 
General Education Program inc hiding one fbimdation course in 
each of the five curricular areas and one second-level course in 
each ofthreeof the five curricular areas. Students must also fill- 
fill the College \Witing and English Competency Requirement 
and the University Mattiematics Requiremoit. 
Bachelor's Degrees 

The university offers the following badielor's degrees Badi- 
elor of Arts (B A.), Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F. A.), BacfaelcH' of 
Sdence (B.S.), and Bachelor of Science in Business Adminis- 
tration (B.SB.A.). 

All bachelor's degrees require conpletioa of at least 120 
credit hours of course work. At least 45 credit hours out of the 
last 60 must be coirpleted in residence at American Univeraty. 
A mininium of 1 5 credit hours must be conpleted at American 
Umversdty in upper-level courses in ttie student's major Amaxi- 
nutm of 75 hours may be transferred towards a bachelor's de- 
gree. Credit eamed in any American University course, on orofif 
catrpus, is residence credit. Credit eamed by an American Lfai- 
versity student through the Consortium of Universities of the 
\\%shington MetropoUtan Area is also residaace CTedit 

Within the total 120 credit hours, studaits rtiist fiilfill a 
6-credit-hour College Writing and English Conpetency Re- 
quirement, a 3-credit-hour Uniwisity Maftiematics Require- 



ment, the General EducationRequiiemrait, and requirements for 
a major 

Undergraduates may count a maximum of 1 2 credit hours of 
internship aixl cooperative education field experience toward 
the 1 20 rmnimim credit hours required for graduation. The field 
experience credit hours tiiat nay be counted toward the require- 
ments for a majcT or minor program n»y be fewer, as deter- 
rrined by the academic departrtKnt, but may not exceed the 
rtBximum of 1 2 credit hours. 
Two Undergraduate Degrees 

A student who fill fills all the requirenents for two bacfaelca's 
programs (including najoi; major-related, and residence re- 
quirements) and cams a total of 1 50 credit hours may be 
awarded two bachelor's degrees. 

in order to be eligible for the second bachelor's degree, the 
student must apply for admission to the second degree program, 
preferably by the end of the junior year. If the student is granted 
admission to the second program, then upon conpletion of all 
requirements for the first jjrogram and the award of the first de- 
gree, the student's status will be changed to the second jrograra 
ITie student must again apply for graduation to be granted the 
second bachelor's degree. 

Combined Bachelor's and Master's 
Degrees 

A student admitted to a combined bachelor's'nBstei's pro- 
gram (involving tentative admisaon to graduate standing, so 
that botti a bachelor's and master's degree may be eamed as the 
result of a planned program of studies during the junior, senior, 
and first graduate year) must follow a prescribed program of 
work, and the student's record must show which courses will be 
appUed toward the undei^graduate degree and which courses will 
be applied toward the mastw's degree. 

Once admited to a combined bachelor's/master's program, a 
student may not be denied entry into that master's program iffliat 
student corrpletes the bachelor's program in good standing and 
rreets univosity and teaching unit minimum standards for ad- 
mission to the master's program involved. 

Students will be admitted to the combined program at two 
levels, once for the undergraduate degree and once for the gradu- 
ate degree. Tuitionandfees will be paid on the basis ofthe level 
at which the student is curreiily registered. When the studenthas 
completed the requirensnts for a bachelor's degree and has been 
admitted to ttie graduate portion ofthe program, tuition and fees 
will be charged at the graduate rste. 

Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours at the 
500-level to the requirMnents for both degree programs. (This 
assumes a graduate degree requirement of up to 36 credit hours. 
In graduate programs with greater requirenents, ttie number of 
credits apphcable to both degrees may be increased). 

Students are required to complete the graduation applicaticn 
and clearance process once for the bachelor's degree and once 
for ttie master's degree. 



Academic Regulations 59 



Grade Point Average 

Students enrolled in an undergraduate degree program must 
maintaina grade point average of at least 2.00 in order to remain 
in good standing and to graduate. 

Evaluation of Progress 

An evaluation of each undergraduate student's progress is 
made by the office of the student 's dean after each semester. In 
addition to the cuinilative grade point average, this evaluation 
considers completion o fall university requirements and the ratio 
of courses satisfactorily completed to all courses atterrq*ed by 
the student Students who are not making satisfactory progress 
are informed in writing of the result of their evaluation and of- 
fered academic advising. 

The university has no strict regulations governing the total 
anxHint of time an undergraduate student may take to fulfill the 
requii^en£nts for a degree, provided the student maintains the 
appropriate grade point average and gives evidence of being se- 
riously interested in the eventual adiievementof hisorher aca- 
demic objective. 

Freshman Forgiveness 

A freshman who, during the first two semesters of full-time 
study, receives a grade of F or X in a course may repeat the 
course at American University within the calendar year thereaf- 
ter, or in the next two regular semesters in which the student is 
enrolled. If the course is not ofiFered within that time, the student 
may use the option the next time it is offered. No grade is re- 
moved fiom tte student's record, but only the grade earned the 
second time the course is taken is used in calculating the grade 
point avaage for purposes of making decisions concerning pro- 
bation, dismissal, and required average for graduation. 

Apart-time undergraduate or nondegree student who, during 
the first 30 credit hours ofstudy, receives a grade ofF in acourse 
may repeat the course at American IMvasity within one calen- 
dar year after tfie semestw in which the grade of F \\bs received, 
with the resulting cumulative index benefits stated above. 

The fi^eshman forgiveness rule does not apply to transfer stu- 
dents even though they nay have entered the university witti 
freshman status. 

Graduate Credit 

Senior students, with the written permission of their dqjart- 
ment chairs ordeans, may enroll in specifically approved gradu- 
ate courses not required for their undergraduate programs Such 
courses mist be designated in writing as graduate-degree credit 
at the time the student registers for fliem A copy of this written 
agreement must be filed in the Office of the Registrar. Retroac- 
tive application of these credits for such purposes is not permit- 
ted. Credit for these courses may be applied toward meeting the 
course requirements for a graduate degree after the student has 
been awarded an undergraduate degree if the student is then ad- 
mitted to a graduate degree program 



Leave of Absence 

Undergraduate students desiring a leave of absence for rea- 
sons other than study at another collegiate institution should re- 
quest an appointment with their dean. If it seems desirable to 
guarantee the student an autoriBt ic nadmission, the dean will is- 
sue a permit for leave o f absence . This pennit will specify a limi- 
tation, one year at most, of automatic rcadmission to the same 
undergraduate program. 

The permit becomes void if the student aftends any domestic 
or foreign collegiate institution during the period of leave. In 
such instances, the student must obtain a permit to study at an- 
other institution before leaving American University. 

Major Requirements 

Each under^graduate must complete at least 36 CTedit hours in 
the degree major and related courses, no fewerthan 1 5 ofwhich 
must be earned in upper-level courses taken in residence at 
American University. 

A grade of C (2.00) or better is required for each major, ma- 
jor-related, or minor course. Students should note feat a C- does 
not quaUfy and any course witha C-or lower will have to be re- 
peated oran equivalent course taken to satisfy fee mqorrequire- 
ment involved. Courses in the major may be taken on a pass/fail 
basis only with pemission of the student's dean or department 
chair. 
Declaration of Major 

By the end of the sophomore year, if not before, each student 
must choose and fotmalfy dedare an academic major 

Admission to the university in an undergraduate program 
does not automatically constitute admission to a major program 
Acceptance is official only when specific approval has been 
granted by the dejjartment chair or program director. 
Multiple Majors 

A student may complete miltiple razors by satisfactorily 
passing the mqor and mqor-related course woric required by the 
departments or schools. 

If the majors are pursued in different schools, fee student 
must designate when dedaring fee majors which school he or 
she will be enrolled in and graduated from The student will need 
to satisfy the general requireriBnts of that school only. If a stu- 
dent is rrajoring in recognized majors that lead to different de- 
grees (eg, BA. and B.S.), the student specifies which of the 
degrees is to be awarded. A student may apply fee same course 
to each major program in whidi it meets fee requirements. 
Interdisciplinary Majors 

In addition to fee established major programs, students have 
the option of construct ing fee ir own major programs leading to a 
B.A or B.S. in Intadisciplinary Studies To design and com- 
plete an interdisciplinary major, a studait mist have fee ap- 
proval of three faculty metribers who represent the various 
disciplines involved in the intadisciplinary field. The mqor ad- 
visor must be a fiill-time &culty merrber. The student applies for 



60 Academic Regulations 



pamisaon to undertake an interdisciplinary majorto the deanof 
the school orco liege in whichhe or she is enrolled. If the focus of 
the interdisciplinary program makes a change of cdlege or 
school afSUation advisable, the student must follow the proce- 
dures for changes in fields of study. 

Interdisciplinary major prograriB must include a total at least 
42 credit hours with grades of C or better, including 36 credit 
hours selected to form an academicaUy sound, unified, and 
weU-defined program, and 6 credit hours in independait study 
or senior seminars supervised by the major advisor and focused 
onthe program's central concept. With prior ^jproval, an appro- 
priate intemdiip or advanced level couise may be substituted for 
all or part of the 6-credit hour independent study. 

At least 75 perc«it of ttie 36 credit hours mist be upper-lewl 
as de fined by the teaching units ttiat o fifer them Students are en- 
couraged to include at least two 500-level courses, although in 
seme areas this may not be possible. A maximum of 18 credit 
hours of wodc conpleted priorto fee sanester in \^liich applica- 
tion is made may be included in the program. 

Studaits imst have at least a 2.50 grade point average (on a 
4.00 scale) to be accepted. All arrangements should be com- 
pleted by the end of the first semester of the junior year, except 
by special permission of the appropriate dean, and no eariier 
than the second sanester of the fieshman year. 

The student must submit a completed Interdisciplinary 
Studies Major Program Form, with required attachments and 
bearing the signatures oftheiTBJoradvisor and the two sponsors, 
to his or her dean. Information submitted mist include the fol- 
lowing. 

1 . A statement of ttie coitral concept ofthe major and an expla- 
nation of its interdisciplinary character. 

2. A statement demonstrating that existing programs do not sat- 
isfy educational needs or vocatioial goals ofthe student. 

3. An outUne ofthe academic requirements ofthe majoi; includ- 
ing a list of aU required courses and a tentative schedule for their 
completion. Individually designed courses mist be outlined. 

4. A Declaration ofMajorFomi, which must ^jecify the name of 
the major and whether a B. A or a B.S. degree is to be awarded 
upon successful completion of the program. 

In accepting tiie proposal for an inteidiscq)linaiy mq'or, the 
dean's office certifies that the rulesestablished for interdisciplin- 
ary studies have been followed and that courses necessary for 
coa5)letion ofthe program will be available, and assumes ad- 
ministrative responsibiKty fcrmonitoring the student's progress 
and clearing the student for graduation. 

Minors 

^ecific course requirements for minors are fisted under de- 
partmental programs. All minor programs consist ofa minimim 
of 18 credit hours, including at least 9 credit hours at the 300 
level or above. For all minors, at least 9 credit horns ofthe stated 
requirements must be taken in residence at American Univer- 
sify. At least 12 credit hours ofthe minca- must be outside ofthe 
course requiremaits for each major the student is pursuing A 



grade ofC (200) cr better is required for each couise used to sat- 
isfy the requirements ofa minor. 

Studoits should consult with their advisors as to the proce- 
dure for declaring a minor. Minors are noted as a comment on 
the student 'spermanent record at 4ie time o f graduation, but will 
not appear oo the student's diploma. 
Interdisciplinary Minors 

b addition to estabh^d minors, students have the option of 
constructingtheirown rainorprograms. To design and complete 
an inteidiscipUnary minor, a student mist have the apjroval of 
two faculty members who represent the discqjfines involved. In- 
tadisciphnary minors must include a total of 24 credit hours 
with grades of C or better, including at least 9 credit hours at the 
300 level or above, selected to form an academically sound, uni- 
fied, and well-defined prograeL For all minors, at least 9 credit 
hours ofthe stated recjuirements must be taken in residence at 
American University. At least 1 2 caedit horns ofthe minor mist 
be outside o f the course requirements for each mEgor the student 
is pursuing. 

Pass/Fail 

Studaits may take up to 50 poicent of their courses on a 
pass/fail basis. If a student's major department approves, this 
percentage may be greater Courses in the student's major mist 
be taken for a letter grade unless ^cial pemnssion is given by 
the dean or department chair. The grade of P (pass) is not used in 
calculating the grade point average. (For more informafion, see 
the Academic Information and Regulations chapter.) 

Resuming Study 

Students who cease to attend the university for an entire se- 
mester, whether voluntarily or not, may not resume study until 
they have been readmitted Readnittedstudents are subject toall 
r^ulations and mist meet all recparements in force when stud- 
ies are resumed unless o&er arrangements have been agreed to 
in writing by the student's dean before ttie beginning of such an 
absence. 

Studaits who change degree objective, college, or school, or 
who choose to conform to new regulations or requirements, 
mist be prepared to complete all requirements and abide by all 
regulations in efiect at the time such a change is made. 

Study at Another Institution 

Study at another institution is usually undertaken during tiie 
summer or as part of an overseas program. 

An enrolled student who plans to take coiases at another col- 
lege or university for transfa* credit to American Umversity 
mist be in gocxl academic standing and must receive prior ap- 
pnoval fit)m the student's department chair and dean using the 
Permit to Study Abroad form or the Permit to Study at Another 
U.S. Institution fcmn. For study abroad, approval isalsorecjuired 
fiom the AU Abroad director If the course to be taken is outade 
the areaof ttie student's majcff, the chairof the department which 



Academic Regulations 61 



would offer credit for such a course must also approve the per- 
mit. Approval is granted for specific courses. 

The viated institution, if in tbe United States, must be region- 
ally accredited. Students who have earned 60 or more credits to- 
waid their degrees (junior standing) at the time ttiey undertake 
woric at another U. S. institution may have credit transferred only 
from institutions accredited for granting bachetor 's or higher de- 
grees. With departmental approval, transfer credit is applicable 
toward the requiremsnts of a major 

Transfa- credit may be used to fulfill General Education Re- 
quiiemeiits through the evaluation of equivalent courses \eken al 
another institution and with the approval of the student's deaa 
Because of the special nature of the program, aflerthe student 
has been admitted to American Univeisity no credit towaid 
General Education Requirements may be earned through trans- 
fer credit 

Study Abroad 

American University offers numerous study abroad pro- 
grams through the AU Abroad Program. Students may also par- 
ticipate in study abroad programs offered by other institutions 
that are part ofa regionally accredited U.S. college or university, 
and are recorded on the transcripts of those inslituticHis. For de- 
termination of regional accreditation, ttie publication Credit 
Given is the accepted reference. 

After consultation with and approval of the student's dean 
and the AU Abroad director, appUcation is made directly to the 
institution for admission to its foreign study program. Transfer 
credit wiH be granted on the basis ofttie transcript finm the spon- 
soring US. college or university. 

Students may alas attend institutions abroad not afSUated 
with an American college or univasity. Requests for transfer 
credit must be made on a Perrrit to Study Abroad form and must 
be jpproved before the student registers at the foreign institu- 
tion The institution to be visited mist be approved by ti»e stu- 
dent's dean and the AU Abroad director. The student's dean and 
academic advisor review the official transcript when the student 
returns to confirm course approval, and forward tbe transcript 
and evaluation to the Office of the Registrar for transfer of ap- 
proved credit. The student's academic advisor and dean also ap- 
prove the academic areas or specific courses of study. 

Students who conplete the Ftermit to Study Abroad form and 
enroU in an non-AU study abroad program are required to pay 
the Pernit to Study Abroad fee for eadi semester, including 
summer, they are registered. 

TVansfer of Credit 

The Admissions OflBce evaluates official documents low- 
ing previous college-level woik completed. Individual teaching 
units determine how this credit will apply to specilic degree pro- 
grams. 

Grades and quality points earned in courses accepted for 
transfer will not be included in the grade point average to be 



maintained at American Ltaiversity,but the credits will ccwnt to- 
waid the total number required for graduation 

Transfer students may normally expect to receive credit for 
courses taken at collegiate institutions that were, at the time the 
courses were taken, regionally accredited or recognized candi- 
dates for accreditation. These courses mist be appropriate for 
academic credit at American Uni vensity towards an undeigradu- 
ate degree program. A maximum of 75 credit hours will be ac- 
cepted on transfer from four-year collegiate institutions. A 
maximumof 60 credit hours will be accepted fiom two-year col- 
legiate institutions. Amaximumof75 credit hours fiom all insti- 
tutions of higher education may be transferred toward a 
bachelor's degree. 

A maximum of 30 credit hours will be accepted on transfer 
for a combination of relevant woik coinpleted satisfactorily in 
college-level Armed Services School courses, U.S. Armed 
Forces Institute correspondence or extension courses, or any 
Military Occupational Skills (MOS) courses completed with a 
grade of 70 or bettei; as recommended at the baccalaureate level 
by the American Council on Education and which is appropriate 
for acadonic credit as determined by the Admissions Office af- 
ter consultation with the appropriate academic unit 

Amaximumof 30 credit hours may be granted for a confcina- 
tionof relevant work completed in college-level nondegree, cor- 
respondaice or extension courses com{deted at an accredited 
institution provided the course work is recognized by that insti- 
tution for credit to ward a degree, and is appropriate for academic 
credit as determined by tbe Admissions Office after consultation 
with the ^propriate academic unit. 

Transfer students may be awarded credit for satisfactory 
scores in subject examinations of the College Level Examina- 
tion Program (CLEP). Students may not receive credit forasub- 
ject examination if a course comparable in content has been 
accepted in transfer by the university, or if the student failed such 
a course (see Advanced Standing, below). Official sc»re reports 
must be sent directly to the Admissions Office fiom ttie Educa- 
tional Testing Service. No transfer credit towards the General 
Education requirements nBy be earned once the student has ma- 
triculated at American Ltaiversity. 
Advanced Standing 

Up to 30 credit hours will be accepted fiomone ora coni)ina- 
tion of Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate, 
and CLEP subject examinations. Upon recommendation of the 
appropriate teaching unit,ad vanced standing may be awarded or 
a course requirement waived for an Altering student on the basis 
of performance in flie Advanced Placement Examination Pro- 
gram of the Cbllege Entrance ExEinination Board, the (figher 
Level subjects of the International Baccalaureate Program, or 
successful performance in the Subject Examination Program of 
the College Level Examinatian Program (CLEP). 

All undergraduate students in a degree program are eligible 
for course credit, with advanced placement vA^eie appropriate, 
on the basis of performance on the CLEP subject examinations. 



62 Academic Regulations 



if the student has not failed or conpleted a credit-bearing course 
cotrparable in content. 

Course credit, with advanced placement where apjwopriate, 
will be assigned for successjiil paformance in the Subject Ex- 
amination Program of CLEP, contingent upon the spedficalion 
of norms and upon approval of the appropriateness of the con- 
tait of fte examinations by the teaching unit concerned. Se- 
lected CLEPexairinations may be applied to up to four comses 
to meet General Education requirements (see below). Credit to- 
ward General Education requirements may be awarded only for 
examinations takai prior to entering American University. Lta- 
der no circumstaix^s will students be peiraitted to re-take a sub- 
ject examination. 

Studaits should consult with their advisors as to how exani- 
nations will apply to their degree programs. Information on reg- 
istering for CLEP subject examinations may be found at 
www.colleeeboaid.orfi/clep . 



The foDowing are CLEP Subject Examinations accepted by 
American University for tlie 2006-07 academic year: 

American Govenroent (AU course equivalent 

GOVT-llOG*) 
American Literature 

Analysis and Interpretation of Literature plus essay 
Biology 

Calculus witti Elementary Functions 
College Level French Language 
CoUege Level German I^anguage 
College Level Spanish Language 
Information Systems and Computer Applications 
Introduction to Educational Psychology 
English Literature 
General Chanistry (AU course equivalent CHEM-1 lOG 

andCHEM-210G*) 
Introductory Psychology 
Human Growth and Development 
Principles of Management 
Introductory Accounting 
Principies of Mariceting 
Princijies of Macroeconomics (AU course equivalent 

ECON-IOOG*) 
Piincijies of Microeconomics (AU course equivalent 

ECON-200G*) 
Introductory Sociology (AU course equivalent 

SOCY-210G*) 
* course equivalents for General Education ocdit 



Undergraduate University Degree Requirements 



College Writing and English Competency 
Requirement 

All students must be able to write in Engli^ with a level of 
mastery equivaleid to ftie demands of college course worie In 
addition, students need to acquire the critical reading skills 
needed for all their college courses. 

Students satisfy the College Writing and English Compe- 
taicy requirwnent by taking one of the required 6-credit course 
sequences listed below during the Iresbman year Students mist 
achieve a grade of C or better. Nonnative and native speakers of 
English must meet the same requiremaits: 

• LIT-1 00 College Writing anJ 
LIT-lOl College \\«ting Seminar 

• LIT-1 02 Ctollege WWting and 
Lrr-103 College miting Seminar 

(for studaits who need extra work on language skiSs) 

• LIT-1 30 Honors English I an</ 
LIT-1 3 1 Honors English H 

The CoUege Writing and English Corrpetency requirement 
may also be satisfied throu^: 

• Advanced Placement En^ish Test score of 4 or 5. 



• Transfer students who present 6 hours of acceptable 
conposition credit from another institution satisfy the 
College \Miting and English Competency requirement by 
passing flie EngUsh Conpetency Examination. Transfer 
students who present 3 hours of acceptable coirposition 
credit firm another institution may satisfy the College 
Writing requirement by passing the couise in the College 
Writing sequence for whidi they haw not been givai credit 
with a C or better 

In those cases when a competency examination is required, 
students failing the exam twice must enroll in LIT-180 
Writing Woricshop and must pass the course with a grade 
of Cor better. 

The Enghsfa Conpetency Examination isachmusteredby the 
College Writing Program in the Department of Literature. Stu- 
dents who do not pass the examination may schedule ameeting 
with a writing consultant in flie \\%iting Center who will review 
the student's exam, explain ttie deficioicies, and offer counsel 
about additional work on writing skills dirough courses, Writing 
Center tutorials, or independent study. A preparation packet for 
the examination, including a practice exam, is available at the 
Department of Literature, Battelte 237 or ttie Witing Center, 
Battelle 228. Formore information about the exam, contact the 
director of the College Writing Program at 202-885-391 1 . To 
schedule an appointment at the Writing Center, call 



Academic Regulatkms 63 



202-885-2991 . Noimative and native speakers of Englidi must 
meet the same requirements, although nonnative speakers are 
afTurded extra time to conplete the Engh^ Competency Exam- 
ination. 

University Mathematics Requirement 

All students must demonstrate skills in mathematics and 
quantitative reasoning at the college levd. Students who do not 
satisfy this requirement by examination as specified below must 
enrc41 in an appropriate mathematics course before the comple- 
tion of 30 credits at American University and must continue to 
enroll each semester until the requirement is satisfied. Alter stu- 
dents haw matriculated at ArrErican University, no credit to- 
waid the University Mafcematics Requirement may be earned 
through transfer credit. Students meeting the requirement 
through course work must receive a C or better. The University 
Ma&ematicsRequiremeit may be satisfied in one ofthe follow- 
ing ways 

• Earning a grade of C or better in any American University 
mathematics course at the level of MATH-ISX Finite 
Mathematics or sbove or any American University statistics 
course in the Department of Mafliematics and Statistics. 
This includes, for example: 
MATH-ISO Finite Mathematics, 
MATH-lSl Finite Mathematics, 

MATH-155 Finite Mathematics: Elementary Models, 
MAFH-IS? Finite Mathanatics: Business, 
MATH-ITO Precalculus Mathematics, 
MArH-211 AppUedCalcuhisI, 
MArH-221 Calculus 1, 
STAr-202 Basic Statistics. 

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics will 
recommend placement of students in mathematics courses. 
Students whose placement is below MATH-lSx Finite 
Mathematics must take MATH-022 Basic Algebra 
before enroUmg in Finite Mathonatics. Students whose 
placement is above Finite Mattiematics may airoll in Finite 
Matiiematics to satisfy the requirement but are to be 
encouraged to enroll in appropriate sections ofthe course, as 
designated by the Department ofMathercBtics and Statistics. 
Students may also satisfy the Lhiversity Mathematics Require- 
ment through examination: 



• APCalculus ABor APCak;ulusBCscoreof3,4, orS 

• APStatisticsscoteof3, 4, or 5 

• SAT n Mathematics I vevein Achievement test score of 650 

• ClJiP Calculus examination score of 7 5% 

• Britidi A-level mattiematics examination with a passing 
grade 

• International Baccalaureate higher-level mathematics 
examination score of 6 or above 

Transfer students and graduates of secondary schools cutside 
the Ltaited States may also satisfy ftiis requirement by: 

• ftssingoneoftiieexaminationsgivenbytheDepartmBntof 
Mathonatics and Statistics which demonstrate competence 
equivalent to having successfully completed one of the 
following courees: MATH-lSx Finite Matiiematics, 
MATH-211 Applied Calculus 1, or STAT-202 Basic 
Statistics. Only one oftheseexarainatiDnsmBy betakai and 
fcat examination may be taken only once, during the first 
semester for which the student is emdled in degree status 

or 

Transferring a course named "Calculus T' or a mattiematics 
couise for whidi "Calculus V is flie prerequisite with a grade 
of B or better fit>m an AG-rated collegiate institution. 
Eligible students shouki contact the Department of Mathe- 
matics and Statistics for more information about tiie Mathemat- 
ics and Statistics Equivalency Examination. 



General Education Program 

• Curricular Area Requirements 

• Questions about General Education 

• Curricular Area Course Clusters 



The General Education Program is designed for all under- 
graduate students regardless ofde gree program Aimed at build- 
ing a strong intellectual foundation, the Gaieral Education 
requirements are drawn fom five curricular areas. The program 
is designed to be completed during the first two years of study, 
allowing students ample time to puisue a major as well as study 
abroad, iidem^ps, and ooop«ative education 

General Education Program Definitions 

Curricuhr Area (or "Area"): One of ftie 6\e conlent-Gpecific 
subdivisions of the General Education Program 

1 . The Creative Arts 

2. Traditions that Shape the Western 'WoM 

3. Global and Multicultural Perspectives 

4. Social Institutions and Behavior 

5. The Natural Sciences 

The Area is represented altera course title as the first nisnbo'in 
the following: l:x, 2;x, 3:x, 4:x, or 5:x. 
Foundation course: A 100-level course in the General Educa- 
tion Program. Note: All courses bken for General Education 
credit have a "O" in the course number. 
Second-fevel course: A 200-tevel course in 4>e Gaieral Educa- 
tion Program. Note: All courses taken for General Education 
credit haw a "G" in the course number. 
Level: Refeis to whether a couise is a foundation or a sec- 
ond-level couise. The level is represented after a course title as 
the second nuniser in the following x: 1 or x;Z 
Cluster; One of two groups of courses (several foundation 
courses and a larger nuirber of second-leve 1 courses) in a Cur- 
ricular Area. 

Sequence: A specified order for taking General Education 
classes: take a foundation course first and foUow it wife one of 
the second-level courses fiom fee same dusto*. 
Discipline: Refers to fee subject prefix in a course number re- 
gardless of academic department or course content For exam- 
ple, the course number PH1L-105G refers to a philosophy 
course; the course number RELG-210G refers to a reUgion 
couise. Alfeough these courses are in fee Philosophy and Reli- 
gion Department, they have different prefixes and are in difier- 
ent disciplines. The course number ARTH- 1 05G refers to an art 
history course;fee ooursenutEberHIST-lOOGrefersto ahistoiy 



couise . Alfeough these couises are bofe about history, they are 
in different disciplines. 

Curricular Area Requirements 

Students select courses fiom feose that are deagnated as 
General Education courses. Students choose two courses, one 
foundation course and one second-level course in the same clus- 
ter, in eadi cumcular area. 

Each curricular area offere students a choice of cme of two 
couise clusters comprising several foundation couises any of 
which may lead to a larger nun±>er of second4evel couises. 

Courses at the foundation level introduce students to the fun- 
damental concepts, issues, and achievements in fee disciplines. 
Courses deal explicitly wife the apjropiate processes and stan- 
dards for gafeoing and evaluating information (quantification, 
expaimaits, primary sources, authoritative texts) and interjae- 
tation (mefeods of investigation and analytic skills) in a specific 
disdplinary field. AU science foundation courses include labo- 
ratory experience. The couises are designed to help students 
achieve a broad view of how different disciplinary viewpoints 
and fields of knowledge can contribute to feeirunderstanding of 
themselves and the world around them. 

General Education foundation courses differ fixsm traditional 
survey courses by integrating into fee course some of the per- 
spectives and foundation skills essoitial to a fiill education. 

These elements include fee following, as approjHiate: 

• writing experience to enhance basic comminication skills 
and to reinforce what is taught in fee CoUege Writing 
program 

• a critical thinking corrponent to afeance fee ability to make 
and analyze judgments based on reasoning and evidence 
aid to evaluate flie reliability of sources of inlbrmation 

• recognition of fee ethical issues pertinent to fee field or 
discifdine 

• developmrat of quantitatiw and conputing skills 

• development of intuitive, creative, and aesfeetic Acuities, 
and the abiUty to connect feese wife reasoning ddUs 

• attention to a variety of perspectives, including feose 
perspectives feat emerge from the new scholarship on 
gender, race, and class as well as fiomnon-Westan cultural 
traditbns 



66 General Education Program 



• a global perspective 

• information literacy to evaluate Ae n^riad sources of 
knowledge in a conplex electronic enviromnait 

The second-levd courses foUow specific groups of founda- 
tion courses, forming a coherent curricular sequence and rein- 
forcing the learning objectives of the foundation course. The 
foundation courses selected froma variety of disciplines assure 
breadth in the student's program wiule the second-level courses 
build on the foundation and encourage study in depth. 

Course Selection 

Studaits select two courses, a foundation course followed by 
a more specialized course in an approved sequence, in each cur- 
ricular area Studaits will not be able to satisfy General Educa- 
tion Requirements with more than two courses in any one 
discipline e wn though a discipline may have courses induded in 
more than one cuiricular area. Courses required for College 
Writing and University Mathematics do not count in the 
tvMS-course limit. 

Prerequisites 

A second-level course may not be taken for General Educa- 
tion credit until after the p>rerequisite foundation course has been 
satisfadorily completed Students who have placed at or below 
Finite Mathematics must satisfy the Univo^ity Mathematics 
Requirement before enrolling in a foundation course in the Ivfeit- 
ural Sciences curricular area Students who have placed above 
Finite Mathematics may take the foundation course in tiie Natu- 
ral Sciaicescurricular area at the same time fliey take the course 
work satisfying the University Mathematics Requirement, or 
even beforehand. 

Relation to the Major 

The requirements for the major, the area of a student's aca- 
demic concaitration, are listed under individual degree pro- 
grams. Many of the courses in the General Education Program 
also meet requiranents of ftie major Studaits interested in a 
double major need to plan ahead if they expect to fulfill all re- 
quirements within 120 credit hours. 

Grading Requirements 

To receive General Education credit, a student mist success- 
fully corrqilete a General Education course wifli a grade of D or 
better Students may elect to take a General Education course on 
apass/feilbasis. Fbwever, ifthe course is also being taken to fill- 
fill a requirement for the major the grading poUcies for that pro- 
gram should be consulted. 



Advanced Placement Credit 

students presenting a 4 or 5 on ftie Advanced Placement ex- 
amination, 75% on the CLEP examination, or grades for which 
they have received credit from the British A Levels, CEGEP, In- 
ternational Baccalaureate, GennanAbitur, or otiier international 
credential for whidi they have been granted credit by American 
University may apply the credit for up to four courses to meet 
General Educationrequirements in anyofthe five curricular ar- 
eas. Credit for General Education may only be awarded when 
specific General Education courses, which have been so desig- 
nated, match particular exam results (with flie exception of the 
CEGEP and German Abitur,whidi are handled adhoc)and only 
for examinations taken prior to entering American University. 
Specific information regarding application of this principle is 
contained in the "Gaieral Education Advanced Placement 
Credit Articulation" efiective for the academic year of adnis- 
sion. This document is maintained by the General Educationof- 
fioe and is available in all advising units. 

IVansfer Students 

Transfer students satisfy their General Education Require- 
ments throu^ a combination of appropriate transfer courses and 
completion of courses in the General Education Program at 
American University. Through the evaluation of equivalent 
courses taken at another institution and with the approval of a 
student's dean, transfer credit may fulfill all 30 credit hours. In 
some cases, studaits supplement transfer credit with General 
Education courses taken at the university to meet the 30-hourre- 
quirenient. The need to satisfy sequaices is waived when 6 
hours in a curricular area are accepted for transfer credit. 

Associate in Arts Degree 

In ttie fields in which the university ofiers an associate de- 
gree, this degree requires the conpletion of at least 60 credit 
hours. Twenty-four hours of courses must be in the General Edu- 
cation Program, to include one foundation course in eadi of the 
five cunicular areas and one second-level course in each of three 
of the five curricular areas. 

Study at Another Institution 

Transfer credit may be used to fill fill Genaal Education Re- 
quirements throu^ the evaliBtionof equivalent courses taken at 
ano&er institution and with the approval of the student's dean. 
Because of the special nature of tfie program, affer the student 
has been admitted to a degree program at American University 
no credit toward General Education Requirements may be 
earned through transfer credit. 



General Esducation Program 67 



General Education and the University 
Mathematics Requirement 

An studDntsmust till till the IJnivetsity Mathematics Requiiv- 
ment before enrolling in their first (foundation level) course in 
the Natural Sciences canicular area (Area 5), unless they have 
placed above Finite Mathematics. Students who have placed 
above the level of l-'inite Mathematics iiBy take the foundation 
course before or ctincurrently with course work taken to satisly 
the University Mathematics Requirement. 

Questions about General Education 

Who has to complete the General Education Program? 

All American University undergraduates must fulfill General 
Education requirements. 

How many courses do I take? 

You rmst take two courses in each of the five Curricular 
Areas (for a total often). First select one of two course clusters in 
an area. Take &om ill a foundation course and then foUo w it wife 
a second-level course that appears in the same cluster. This se- 
queiKing is essential to the concept of tiie program, as each sec- 
ond-level course links in content to particular foundation 
courses. 

Is it possible to take a second-level course before taking the 
foundation course? 

No, if you are taking the couises for General Education credit, 
the foundation courses serve as a preretpjisite for second-level 
courees. 

What if a course closes before I can register for it or it 's not of- 
fered the semester I want to take it? 

Almost all courses are offered at least once a year, so wait un- 
til next semester and see if it fits into your schedule. Or, you may 
take a different couree if it 's compatible with your schedule and 
you've net all the prerequisites. However, if it's a second-level 
coinse, be sure it 's in the same cluster as the foundation course 
you've taken. 

How many courses may I takefrvm each disciplinefor General 
Education credit? 

Although some academic departments have couises in sev- 
eral Areas, you may not lake more flian two General Education 
couises in a discipline. For example, you may only take two so- 
ciology courses (course numbers beginning with SOCY)out of 
your ten General Education courses 

Wha grade do I have to get in my General Education classes ? 

You must get a D or belter in order to get General Education 
credit. You may also take a General Education class on a 
pas^fail basis. However, if you are taking a General Education 
class to fulfill arequtrement towards yo ur major, youmayneeda 
di£fa«nt grade. Check with the appropnate academic depart- 
ment to be sure. 



May I take a General Educ-ation course, but not for General Ed- 
ucation credit? 

Yes, you may be able to count courses in the General Educa- 
tion Program towards your mqor or minor requirements, or for 
elerfive credit. Courses are offered for non-General Education 
credit under the same course number but without ftie."G" For 
exanple, HCCM-IOOG is also offered as ECON-100 for stu- 
dents not taking it for Goieral Education credit. 

May I spread out my General Education courses over four 
years? 

The program is designed so that it can be completed in your 
first two years. You should finish your General Education re- 
quirements as soon as possible to keep your last years open for 
off-campus opportunities, such as intem^ps and study abroad 
1 f you have not yet completed your mith requirement, it isessen- 
tial that you speak to your advisor about its connection to the 
Area 5 Natural Sciences requirement. 

Is there any way lean be exempted from the General Education 
requirements? 

No, all undergraduate students at American University must 
conplete the General Education Programas well as the College 
Writing and Ltaivereity Mathematics requirenBnts. 

May I use my advanced placement credits towards General Ed- 
ucation requirements? 

Students presenting a 4 or 5 on the Advanced Pkicement ex- 
amination, 75% on the CLEPexanination, or grades for which 
they have received credit from the EMtish A Levels, CE05P, In- 
ternational Baocalaweate, German Abitur or other international 
credential for wliich they have been granted credit may be able 
to apply ftie credit for up to four courses to meet the General Ed- 
ucation requirements in any ofthe five Curricular Areas. Credit 
for General Education may only be awarded when specific Gen- 
eral Education comses, which have been so designated, matdi 
particular exam results (with flie exception of ttie CEGEP and 
German Abitur, which are handled ad hoc) and only for exams 
taken prior to entering American Lfaiveisity. Specific informa- 
tion is contained in file General Education Advanced Placement 
Credit Articulation effective for the academic year of admission 
This document is maintained by the Geisral Esducation OflBce 
and is available in all advising units and on-line at: 
www.gened.amBrican.edu . Click "Student^' at the top ofthe 



What if I want to take a General Education course at another 
school or use a study abroad course for General Education 
credt? 

Due to the unique nature of General Eulucation courses and 
how they're taught, once students are enrolled, they must com- 
plete all Genaal Education courses at American University 



68 General Education Program 



Courses at other institutions or other American University 
courses may not be substituted. 

Do transfer students have to conqAete General Education re- 
qidrements? 

Yes, transfer students must still fiilfill General Education re- 
quirenents. However, courses taken prior to admission to 
American Ltoiveisity will be matched with General Education 
courses to determine whether they quality for credit in the pro- 
gram. H is technically possible for all ten courses to be trans- 
ferred with a dean's approval Ifa student transfers both couises 
in one Curricular Area, the sequencing requiemait is waived. 

Where do I go finr help in planning my General Education 
courses? 

Students dwuld take the responsibihty of planning whidi 
General Education courses they will take, making sure they fol- 
low all program requirements and mles. Each sonester before 
registering on-line, you will be reminded to review your elec- 
tronic degree audit report, which will indicate the General Edu- 
cation requirements you still need to fulfill. If you have 
questions orare havingdifliculty in choosingaparticular course, 
your academic advisor or the publications available on canpus 
and on-line at www.gened.american.edu may be able to assist 
yoa You may also contact the Gen«al Education office at 
202-885-3879 ore-mail: gened@american.edu. 

What 's the connection between the General Education Program 
and the University Mathematics Requirement? 

You rrust fulfill the University Mathematics Requireinait 
before enrolling in your first (foundation level) course in the 
Natural Sciences curricular area (Area 5), unless you have 
"placed" above Finite Mathematics. If you have placed above 
the level of Finite Mathematics, you may take the foundation 
course in Area 5 before or concunently with course woik taken 
to satisfy the University Mathematics Requiremait 



Most Important Program Regulations 

• Be sure the courses you take for Goieral Educationhave a 
"G" in the course number 

• Take a foundation and second-level course in sequence 
from the same cluster in each curricular area. 

• Take the foundation course before the second-level course, 
unless the credit for the second-level course is accepted 
through transfer. 

• Do not take more than two courses from any single 
discipline as indicated by the subject prefix (for exarrpk, 
BIO is Bblogy and HIST is History) for General Education 
credit (including transferred courses). 

• Fulfill the University Mathematics requirement befwe 
enrolling in the Natural Sciences curricular area, unless you 
have placed above Finite Mathematics. 

• Once enrolled, all courses to MfiU General Education 
requiremaits imst be taken at Armican University. 

• YoumustpassaGeneralEducationooursewitha grade ofD 
or better You may take a General Education course 
Pass'Fail if the course is not taken for your major or if your 
major program allows the PassFaU option. 



General Education Program 69 



Curricular Area 1: The Creative Arts 



This dimension of the curriculum is designed to develop an informed understanding of literary and artistic creativity and of the dis- 
tinct aesthetic languages of the visual arts, literature, music, theater, and dance. Students g^in this understanding through the study of 
historical and contanpoiary exampJes of the arts and letters, or through the disciplined practice of a creative art form. 



Course Goak 

• study classic works of the faun£in imaginaticn 

• critically analyze creative works fiom fee viewpoints of form, 
dyle, and rrEaning 

• understandhowandbywhcmaestheticvaluejudgmenlshave 
been made historically 

• examine the nature of imaginative and intuitive thinkin g 



consider the relationship between problem solving and 

creativity 

develop aesthetic sensibility, discenament, and inforrried 

judgnents 

explore the interaction of art and society 

develop creative and e^ressive abilities in order to 

understand the qualities that sbiipe an artist's work 



Foundation Courses: Students select a 100-level course in one of the two clusters. 

Second-level Courses: Students select a 200-level course in the same cluster as the ibundatian course. 



Cluster One: Understanding Creative 
Processes 



Cluster Two: Understanding Creative 
Works 



Foundation Courses 

ARTS-IOOG Art: The Studio Experience 

LTT-IOSG The Literary Imagination 

PERF-1 1 OG Understanding Musk; 

PERF-11 5G Theater FYinc5)les, Plays and Performance 

Second-Level Courses 

ARTS-205G The Artist's Paspective: Drawing 
ARTS-210G The Artist's Perspective: Painting 
ARTS-215G The Artist's Pospective: Sculpture 
LlT-21 5G Waters in Print/in Person 
PERF-200G Dance and Sodety 
PERF-205G Masterpieces of Music 
PERF-210G Greatness in Music 
PERF-225G The African American E;q)erience in the 
Performing Arts 



Foundation Courses 

ARTH-105G Art: The Historical Experience 
COMM-105G Visual Literacy 
LIT-120G Interpreting Literature 
Lrr-135G Critical Approach to the Cinema 

Second-Level Courses 

ANTH-225G Languagie and Hunan Experiraice 
ARTH-210G Modem Art: Nineteenth and Twentieth 

Caituries 
ARTH-215G Ardiitecture: Washington and the World 
Lrr-225G The African Writer 
Lrr-245G The Experience of Poetry 
LIT-270G Transfiwmations of Shakespeare 
PERF-21 5G Opera on Stage and Fihn 
PEEIF-220G Reflections of American Society on Stage 

and Screen 
PHIL-230G Meaning and I^urpose in the Aits 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-2 lOG General Education Area 1 Topic 
Special topics offered for second -level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Qasses. 



Wild Card Counes 

GNED-210GGerKral Education Area 1 Topic 
Special topicsofifered for second -level credit; ^lecific topics aie 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



70 General Education Program 



Curricular Area 2: Traditions that Shape the Western World 

Tliis curricular area aims to enrich studeiis' knowledge and appredation of Westan civilization. Courses explore the people, 
forces, evenis, and institutioiB that have shaped history, and ttie various philosophical, religious, and ethical questions that provide the 
foundation for moral choice. Students become aware of the aocoin{iishiiKnts and limitations of particular cultures, ofhow ourhves to- 
day reflect tte past fromwhidi we evolved, and ofhow ideas about the past shape peiceptionsofthepresent and plans fortiie future. 



Course Goals 

• understand the historical and philosophical tiaditicos that 
shape the Western world 

• recognize that Western intellectual traditions are defined by 
diversity as much as by commonaUty, by both resistance to 
and enrichment by influences fiom the rest o f the world, and 
that challenge to authority has been a distinctive 
characteristic of these traditions 

• read and discuss fundamental texts fiom these traditions 



• examine and assess evidence, draw conclusions, and 
evaluate ttie meaning of fiiese conclusions 

• examine historical and {iiilosophical issues critically and 
conparatively 

• consider the contributions of eOiical and religious systems 
to human Ufe 

• discuss the complex interplay between the rich varieties of 
tradition and the necessity of change 



Foundation Courses: Students select a 100-leveI course in one of the two clusters. 

Second-level Courses: Students select a 200-level course in the same cluster as ttie foundation course. 



Cluster One: Cultures of the West 



Cluster Two: Western Heritage and 
Institutions 



Foundation Courses 

ARTH-IOOG European Art From Cave to Cathedral 
MST-IOOG Historian and the Living Past 
HIST-llOG Renaissance and Revolutions: 

Europe, 1400-1815 
1JT-125G Great Books That Shaped the Western Wwld 
WGSr-150G Women's Voices flirou^ Time 



Foundation Courses 

GOVT-105G h«lividual Freedom vs. Auftority 

mST-l 1 5G Woik and Community 

JLS-11 OG Western Legal Tradition 

miH 05G Western Philosophy 

RELG-105G The Religious Hraitage of Ibe West 



Second-Level Courses 

ANTH-2350 Early America: The Buried Past 
ARTH-205G Art of ftie Renaissance 
HIST-205G American Encounters: 1492 1865 
HIST-215G Social Forces that Shaped America 
JWST-205G Ancient and Medieval Jewish Civflization 
JWST-2 lOG Voices of Modem JewiA Literature 
Lrr-235G Afiican American Literature 
Lrr-240G Asian American Lito^ture 
Lrr-265G Literature and Society in Victorian England 



Second-Level Courses 

COMM-270G How ttie News Media Shape History 
HIST-235G The West in Crisis, 1 900-1945 
JLS-225G American Legal Culture 
LFS-230G The Modernist Expkision; Culture and 

Ideology in Europe 
FHII^220G Moral Philosophy 
FHI1^235G Theories of Democracy and Human Ri^ts 
PHYS-230G Changing Views of the Universe 
RELG-220G Religious Thought 
SOCY-215G Tte Rise of Qitical Social Ihou^t 



WM Card Cowses 

CS^JED-220G General Education Area 2 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level oedit; specific topics are 
Usted each sonester in the Schedule of Classes. 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-220G General Education Area 2 Topic 
Sfiecial topics o£fa«l fijrseoond-fevel credit; spedfic topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



General Education Program 71 



Curricular Area 3: Global and Multicultural Perspectives 

This dinKnsron ofthe cuniculum is designed to create an informed understand ingof our intcidepmden^ 
intercultural awareness and cormiunication. Courses in this area sedc to develop an understanding of non- Western cultures and tradi- 
tions. They also address both timeless and newly etnjrgent issues of internal ional relations and introduce students to cultural diversity 
and its eflects on the interaction of peoples and states. 



Course Goals 

• understand those habits of thought and feeling that 
distinguish cultures fiom one another 

• explore conparative and aoss-cultuial peispectives 

• develop analytical skills appropriate to the study of 
international and inteicultural ledations 



understand concepts, patterns, and trraids ttiat characterize 
international and intercultural relations 

analyze systematically major issues such as war and peace, 
^obal order, distributive justice, and the finite diaiacter of 
the earth's resources 



Foundation Courses: Students select a 100-level course in one of the two clusters. 

Second-level Courses: Students select a 200-level course in the same cluster as the foundation course. 



Cluster One: Global Perspective 

Foundation Courses 

ECON-1 lOG The Global Majority 
GOVT-1 30G Comparative Politics 
HIST-120G Impaialism and Revolution 
S1S-105G World PoUtics 
SB-HOG Beyond Sovereignty 



Cluster Two: Multicultural Experience 

Foundation Courses 

ANTH-1 lOG Culture: The Human Mimar 

LIT-1 50G Third World Literature 

RELG-185G Forms of the Sacred Religions of the East 

S1S-140G Cross-Cultural Corranunication 

SOCY-1 lOG Views fron the Third Wcrld 



Second-Level Courses 

COMM-280G Ccntemporary Media in a Global Society 
EDU-285G Education for International Developn»nt 
GOVT-235G Dynamics of ftihtical Change 
HIST-225G Russia: Past and Present 
IBUS-200GThe Global Maiket^ace 
LFS-200G Russia and the Uiited States 
SIS-215G Competition in an Lntadependent Worid 
SB-220G Confixjnting Our Differences/Discovering Our 

Sirrularities: Conflict Resohition 
SIS-255G China, Japan and the United States 
SOCY-225G Conten^xjrary Arab Worid 



Second-Level Courses 

ANTH-210G Roots of Racism and Interracial Hannony 
ANTH-215G Sex, Geaier, and Culture 
ANTH-220G Living in Multicultural Societies 
ANTH-230G India: Its Living Traditions 
HIST-250G Civilization and Modemi2ati(Mr Asia 
LFS-210G Latin America: History, Ait, Literature 
RELG-210G Non- Western Religious Traditions 
S1S-210G Human Geography: Peoples,Plaoes, and Cultures 
S1S-245G The World of Islam 
S1S-250G Qvilizations of Africa 
SOCY-235G Women in the Third Worid 



wad Card Courses 

GNED-230G GeiEral Education Area 3 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-230G Gensral Education Area 3 Topic 
Special topics offered for second -level credit; specific topics are 
listed eadi semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



72 General Education Program 



Curricular Area 4: Social Institutions and Behavior 

This diinerBicm of the cuniculumis designed to broaden inrierstanding of the stnKJtures andpri^ 
litical, social, and economic institutions In addition, students exairine the role of the individual in society through sustained analysis of 
HBJor modes of organization and important theories and nwdels. 



Course Goals 

• understanl and critically analyze concepts, patterns, and 
issues thai affect the oiganization of societies and the 
relationship between the individual and ttie society 

• study institutions, systems, and patterns of governance and 
of economic and social organization that underlie 
contemporary societies 

• critically analyze classic theories ofhuman organization 



discuss the values and ^ical issues that underlie social, 

political, and economic organizations 

examine ttie formulation of pohcies and the consequences 

of different poUcy options 

analyze distinctive methods of inquiry appropriate to tiie 

study of societal institutions and patterns, using quaititative 

as vje]l as qualitative techniques 



Foundation Courses: Students select a 100-level course in one of the two clusters. 

Second-level Courses: Students select a 200-level course in the same cluster as flie foundation course. 



Cluster One: Institutions 



Cluster Two: Social Behavior 



Foundation Courses 

COMM-IOOG Ltoderstanding Mass Media 
ECON-IOOG Macroeconomics 
GONT-l lOG Pohtics in the United States 
SOCY-1 50G Global Socidogy 



Foundation Courses 

ANTH-150G Anthropology of American Life 
PSYC-105G Psychology. Undrastanding Human Behavior 
SOCY-IOOG AnBrican Society 
WGST- 1 25G Gender in Society 



Second-Level Courses 

AMSr-240G Poverty and Culture 
COMM-275G Dissident Media Voices from the 

Underground 
BCON-200G Microeconomics 
FIN-200G Personal Finance and Financial Institutions 
QOVT-210O Pohtical Povver and American Public PbUcy 
GOVT-215G Civil Rights and Liberties 
fflIL-240G Ethics in the Professions 
SOCY-210G hiequaKty: Qass, Race, Ethnicity 
WGSr-225G Gender, Politics, and Power 



Wild Card Courses 

aNED-240G General Education Area 4 Topic 
Special topics offered for second-level credit; spedfic topics are 
Usted each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



Second-Level Courses 

EDU-205G Schaols and Society 

HFrr-245G Gender, Culture and Health 

HIST-210G Ethnicity in America 

HIST-220O Women in America 

1D1S-210G Conterrporary Multi-ethnic Voices 

JLS-200G Deprivation of Liberty 

JLS-21 5G Violaice and Institutions 

JLS-235G Justice in America 

JLS-245G Cities and Crime 

PSYC-205G Social Psychology 

PSYC-215G Abnormal Psychobgy and Society 

PSYC-235G Ttoories of Personahty 

SOCY-205G The Family 

Wild Card Courses 

GNED-240G General Education Area 4 Topic 
Special topics offered Ibr second-level credit; spedfic topics are 
Usted each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



General {Education Program 73 



Curricular Area 5: The Natural Sciences 

This curricular area provides students with a basic understanding of the natural sciences and an inibnned understanding of the na- 
ture of scientific reasoning, discovery, and invention through a systanatic exploration of the basic concepts and practices of biology, 
chemistry, physics, and experimental psychology. 
Course Goals 



understand the makeup and woddngs of the natural world 
and the beings living in it 

understand how science works through explicit 
examination of the historical development and current 
status of scientific methods, concepts, and principles 

understand how the sciences use successive 
experimentation to repUcate, control variables, explain 
error, and buUd explanatory models 
experience scieilific experimentation through laboratory 



practice problem solving using quantification, statistical 

analysis, and computa- data manipulation 

analyze and evaluate the contributions of important 

scientists 

develop a respect for the finite resources of our jianet, 

responsible use of technology and nuclear power, the limits 

of humane research, and the fiBgile wonders of the natural 

world 



Foundation Courses: Students select a 100-leveI course in one of the two clusters. 

Second-level Courses: Students select a 200-level course in the same cluster as the foundation course. 



Cluster One: The Living World 

Foundation Courses 

BIO-IOOG Great Experiments in Biology 

BIO-1 lOG General Biology 1 

PSYC-1 1 5G Psychology as a Natural Science 



Second-Level Courses 

ANTH-250G Human Origins 

BIO-200G Structure and Function of the Human Body 

BIO-210G General Biology n 

(prerequisite: BIO-UOG General Biobgy I) 
BIO-220G Ihe Case for Evolution 
BIO-240O OcearBgraphy 
BIO-250G Living in the Environment 
CHEM-205G The Hurran Genone 
HFrr-205G Currait Concepts in Nutrition 
PSYC-200G Behavior Principles 
PSYC-220G The Senses 
PSYC-240G Drugs and Betovior 



Wild Card Courses 

GNED-250G General Education Area 5 Topic 
Special topics oflFered for second -level credit; specific topics are 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



Cluster Two: The Physical World 

Foundation Courses 

CHEM-IOOG The Molecular World 
CHEM-1 lOG General Chemistry I 
PHYS-IOOG Physics for the Modem World 
PHYS-105G College Physics 1 
PHYS-1 lOG University Physics I 

Second-Level Courses 

BIO-240G Oceanography 
CHEM-205G The Human Genon* 
CHEM-210G General Chemislry 11 

(prerequisite: CHEM-1 lOG General Chemistry I) 
CHEM-220G Envirorunental Resources and Energy 
CHEM-230G Earth Sciences 
CHEM-250G Criminalistics, Crime, and Society 
PHYS-200G Physics for a New Millennium 
PHYS-205GColbge Physics n 

(praiequisite: PHYS-1 05G College Physics I) 
PHYS-210G University Physics H 

(prerequisite: PHYS-1 lOG University Physics I) 
PHYS-220G Astronomy 



>Mld Card Courses 

GNED-250G General Education Area 5 Topic 
Special topicsofiered forsecond-level credit; specific topics aie 
listed each semester in the Schedule of Classes. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Dean Kay J. Mussell 

Associate Dean for Academic Aflairs ThonBs Husted 

Associate Dean for Budget and Administration 

Kathleen Ketmedy-Corey 

Associate Dean for Sciences David Culver 

Asastant Dean for Program Development 

Maiy Schellinger 

Academic Counsebrs Maria Boren, Sandra Dewey, 
Cheryl Qindlesperger, Ame Kaiser, Jack Ramsey, 
Darryl Robinson, Douglas Vibert 
Students should make appointments to meet witti 
academic counselors through Academic Affairs 
by phone: 202-885-2453, e-mail: ask-cas@american.edu 
or g3 to: www.american.edu/cas 

The mission ofthe CoUege of Arts and Sdenoes (CAS) is to 
inspire and invigorate the creative potential of students and fac- 
ulty to perceive, conceptualize, and act. In pursuing these goals, 
we are dedicated to preserving civilization's accumulated ac- 
conplishments as expressed ftirough the arts, humanities, sci- 
ences, and social sciences. We are further dedicated to 
expanding knowledge through the original contributions of fac- 
ulty and students. In developing the professional applicability of 
our programs, we attest to and demonstrate our immediate rele- 
vance to the larger world 

Meirbers of the CAS community work collaboratively to 
achieve their academic, professional, and jieisonal objectives. 
In this spirit, the college has estaHished a proud tradition of 
cotdbinrng outstanding teaching with excellence in research 
and creative endeavors, through which we fieely explore the 
past and presait in orda- to better shape the future. Students 
leam to examine Western and non- Western cultures in their 
many aspects; to appreciate sdentific inquiry, to master written 
and oral expression; to deve lop the critical ability to analyze and 
syn&esizB infcxmation, and to build an understanding of the 
moral and ethical dimenaons ttiat ^ould inform aO individual 
and collective decision making. Woridng with faculty and pea- 
mentors, as well as with professional academic counselors, stu- 



dents select courses, majors, and programs of study to achieve 
these goals. 

The college takes particular pride in the broad range of its 
programs and in its interactive approach to learning CAS units 
include: the Departments of Anthropology, Art, Biology, 
Chemistry, Computer Science, Audio Tedmology, and Physics, 
Economics,, I-fistory, Language and Foreign Studies^ Literature, 
Maftiematics and Statistics, Perfomiing Arts, Phitosophy and 
Religion, Psychology, and Sodology; the School of Education, 
Teaching and Health; and programs in American Studies, Arab 
Studies, Environmental Studies, Jewish Studies, Multi-Ethnic 
Studies, North American Studies, and Women's and Gender 
Studies. Degrees offered include master's {xxsgrams in sixteoi 
fields and doctorates in four fields. Our varied and rigorous cur- 
ricular offerings reafiGrm the values and ideals of traditional, 
comprehensive arts and sciences education. 

The College of Arts and Sciences draws on the educaticxial 
resources of \\%shington, D.C. — social, cultural, artistic, and 
sciaitific — that bring a unique dimension to intellectual inquiry. 
These indude the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing 
Arts, the Library of Congress, the Smithsonian Institution, the 
National Academy of Sdences, the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administratioa, ttie National Archives, the Wsrld Bank, 
and foreign embassies. Through off-campus visits, distin- 
gui^ed lecturers, and field e^qjeriaices such as co-ops and in- 
ternships, the college creates a "Washington Connection" that 
enhances traditional classrocm learning. These experiences 
outade ofthe dassroom help students discover how liberal arts 
perspectives enable them to create a broad vision and under- 
standing as they acquire the knowledge and sMls appropriate to 
the fiilffllment of Ufe as responsible and educated citizensof the 
worid. 
Faculty 

The College of Arts and Sdenoes has a distinguished 
teaciier-scholar faculty of over 500 fiill-time and adjunct profes- 
sors. Experts in their own fields, they have included ambassa- 
dors, advisors to presidents, world-renowned performers, 
distingui^ed scientists, recognized writers, artists, and com- 
fKDsers, pbneers in educ^on and learning theories, and consul- 
tants to major organizations, corporations, and nations. Each 



75 



76 College of Arts and Sciaices 



year the college invites professors from other institutions, 
American and international, as well as artists in residaice, to 
join the faculty. 

Ninety-five percent of flie faculty hold doctorates or the ap- 
propriate tenrdnal degree in their disciplines. The feculty's 
adiievanents are also reflected in their strong record of publi- 
cations, grants, and scholarly awaids in teaching and reseandt 



Undergraduate Study 



Academic Advisement 

The college challenges students to assume substantial re- 
sponsibility for defining their educational goals, yet provides 
carefiil professional guidance to help them respond to the chal- 
lenge . Lhdergraduates plan their academic programs with aca- 
demic counselor and faculty advisors according to their 
interests, professbnal plans, and academic jHwgress. Before 
they enroll in classes, first-aemester ficshmai choose courses 
with the assistance of a detailed curriculum guide. During 
fieshman orientation, students are assigned an academic coun- 
selor who advises them until they choose their mqors, usually 
by the end of the sophomore year Aftw students fornBlly de- 
clare their rtBJors, they are advised by faculty advisors bam 
their major departments. Transfer students go to the depart- 
rT£nts of their intended majors for academic advisement, or if 
undecided on a m^or, are advised by an academic counselor 
Assessment of Experiential Learning 

The Assessment of Experiential Learning (AEL) program, 
designed for adults who have been out of high school for at 
least eight years, enables students to eam credit for learning 
gained through work, travel, and community service. In 
EDU-240 Analysis of Experiential Learning, students work 
closely with faculty to devebp a portfoho that describes, ana- 
lyzes, and documents their life experience and learning. Stu- 
dents can eam up to 30 credits appUed as electives toward an 
undergraduate degree program. For more information on fee 
AH. program call 202-«85-2453. 
Foreign Langu^e 

The College of Arts and Sciences encourages students to 
gain proficiaicy in at least one foreign language, eqjecially 
those embarking on a career in international relations, study of 
the hunanities, or specialization in rrinoiity gxjups in the 
Uttited States. Graduate study will oftai require pt)ficiency in 
one or more foreign languages. 
Internships and Cooperative Education 

Internship arxl cooperative education engage the studertf in 
practical experiences, support learning, and provide on-the-job 
training Intons work in many org3nizations in both the pubUc 
and the private sectors in the Washington area. The growing 
number of irtem^ps in the coU^e is testimony to both their 
popularity and their success. For more information on intern- 
ships and cooperative education, see also Career Services. 
Majors 

No lata' than the end of the so{^cmore year, CAS students 
are expected to declare an acadenic major. In this field the stu- 



dent piraies study in depth and synthesizes academic knowl- 
edge. Major programs are described in the departmental sec- 
tions. Students should become familiar with departmental 
requirements and regulations as stated in this catalog. When 
rToking a formal declaration of major, studoits are assigned an 
academic advisor who will supervise flieir studies until gradua- 
tion. Studerrls interested in the natural sciences, mafliematics, 
naisic, and art need to take ^)ecific courses in the fi«sfaman year 
if they intend to complete a degree in eight semesters. Such stu- 
dents should declare their interests as soon as possible and seek 
explicit counseling fiomthe appropriate department. 
Interdisciplinary Major 

This program permits College of Arts and Sciences under- 
graduates to complete an interdisciplinary major according to 
their needs, abilities, and interests A program is fortrrulated with 
the advice and approval of three feculty membCTS fixan disci- 
plines relevant to the student's defined emjiiBsis, and is subject 
to the review and apiproval of tiie dean 

The initiative Ues with the student, who is responable for de- 
termining the concept or theme on which the program is to cen- 
ter. Wifti the three faculty membas, the student determines the 
requireriKnts of ftie chosen concentration and identifies a se- 
quence of course work that fiilfillsthe program's objectives. The 
program must be formulated in a written statement no later than 
the first semester of the junior year Forrrxjre information see un- 
dergraduate degree requirements. 
Minors 

Undergraduate students may eam a minor in most depart- 
ments and programs ofthe College of Arts and Sdences. All mi- 
nor programs consist of a minimum of 1 8 credit hours, including 
at least 9 credit hours at the 300 level or above. For all ninors, at 
least 9 credit hours ofthe slated requirements must be taken in 
residence at American University and at least 1 2 credit hours of 
the trrinor must be unique to the minor For more information see 
undergraduate degree requiremerts. For descriptions of specific 
minor programs, see individual dqjartmental listings. 
Preprofessional Programs 

Preprofessional programs are available in engineering, law, 
and medicine and related health fields. Pre-theology students 
find the university's relationship with the Wesley Theological 
Seminary bene ficial, arxl the Kay Spiritual life Center directs an 
innovative program of religious activities that con^lements 
preprofessicaial studies in religion 
Study Abroad 

AU Abroad offers the opportunity for students to study 
abroad and ^in fiill American University course credit. All stu- 
dents are erKOuraged to learn and work in another culture. AU 
Abroad enclave prograrrB, mmy of which include internship op- 
portunities, are offered in Beijing, Berlin, Brussels, Havana, 
London, Madrid, Nairobi, Paris, Prague, Rons, and Santiago. In 
addition, through the AU Abroad Partner program students may 
spend a semester or year at prestigious universities across the 
gtobe, including Canada, Mexico, England, Scotland, Ireland, 
France, Poland, Netherlands, Argentina, Australia, New Zea- 



Amencan Studies 77 



land, Korea, la^el, Egypt, Lebanon, and Shaijah, UA.E Inter- 
national sludy tours led by faculty rrembers are oQered during 
semester breaks and summer sessions. For more information on 
AU Abroad programs, caD 202-885-1 320 or 866-313-0757, 
e-mail auabroad(S)american edu or go to: 
www.auabroadamericaaedu/ . 

Associate in Arts (A.A.) 

This program is designed to serve flie educational needs of 
high school graduates who seek professional or personal ad- 
vancement through either fuH- or part-time study. Some stu- 
dents do not or cannot remain in college for four years, yet 
desire to complete a degree program The Associate in Arts de- 
gree may be awarded after suocessfijl corrpletion of two yeare' 
study or ftie equivalent. 
Admission to the Program 

Any student admitted to degree status at American Univer- 
sity is eligible for adnisaon to this program. 
University Requirements 

• Atotal of 60 credit hours 

• 6 a<edit hotrs of college wnting 



• 3 credit hours of college mathenBtics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotal of ei^t courses induding one foundation coirse in 
each of the five curricular areas and one second-level course 
inthreeofthe fivecurricularareas, in anappiovedsequence. 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the sans 
discipline 

Graduate Study 

The graduate programs of the College of Arts and Sciences 
are directed toward the development o fhighly con^ietent scien- 
tists, artists and performers, sensitive teachers, and critical 
scholars. To achieve this objective, the college provides an aca- 
demic setting and climate fevorable to flie free interchange of 
ideas and the disciplined exploration and testing of concepts 
and hypotheses. 

Doctoral programs are offered in anthropology, economics, 
history, aid pjsychology with tracks in clinical psydiology and 
behavior, cognition, and neurosciaice. All departments offer 
master's programs, including innovative interdiscipiinary stud- 
ies ttiat enhance students' understanding of, and sensitivity to, 
the intellectual issues and p)ractical apipUcaticns of their own 
fields. 



American Studies 



Coordinator R. J. Dent, Department of Antfiropology, 

Faculty fiom the Departments of Anthropology, History, Litera- 
ture, and other depiartnients and schools of the university teach 
courses in the pirogram. 

The American Studies Program offers students ttie opjportu- 
nityto explore American culture through many paths, induding 
America^ intdlectual traditions, creative arts, popxilar media, 
material culture, ethnic variety, folklore, social structure, and 
social change. Students leara to draw together ttie tools and in- 
sights of other discijiines to c^ture the complexities of Ameri- 
can society, and to discover what Americans share as well as 
how they differ. In addition to foundaticn courses in the pro- 
gram, students choose one area of particular interest to them. 
Some decide to concentrate in a field such as literature, busi- 
ness, joumalian, anthrop»logy, history, or art. Others oeate a 
more jieisonalized ^jecialty such as women's studies, Afii- 
can-Amaican studies, or urban affairs. 

All studoits leara to use and apipireciate Wadiington's re- 
search centers and cultural resources, including the Library of 
Congress, the National Archives, flie SrrBthsonian Institution, 
and the dty's many museums, and many study the city itself 
Most students woric at iiilemdiips during thar senior year in 
such places as Congress, the Kennedy Center, the Shiitiisonian, 
or Common Cause. 



The goals of the pirogram are to help each student develop an 
area of expertise and to build the ddUs for thinking critically 
writing dearly, and untangling the relationship between large 
cultural forces and ordinary p)eoples' life experiences. Program 
graduates woik in such diverse fields as journalism, local or na- 
tional government, foreign service, teaching, nuseums, private 
business, and social services. Many students go on to graduate 
study or to law school 

B.A. in American Studies 

Admission to the Program 

ForrTHl admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
ageof 2.50 (ona 4.00 scale) in two courses related to the major. 
University Requirements 

• Atotalofl20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hoirs of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or ttie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouises, consisting ofonefoundationcouise and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence fixjmeadi 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 



78 College of Arts and Sciences 



Major Requirements 

• 43 oedit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• AMSr-206 American Dreams/American Lives (3) 

• AMSr-400 Interpreting American Cultuie (4) 

• ANTH-251 Perspectives in Cultural Anthropobgy (3) 

• 9 credit hours fiom ttie following; 
fflST-20&«IST-205G AnBrican Encounters: 

1492-1865 2:2(3) 
HIST-206 The United States fiom Emancipation to 

Worid War H (3) 
LIT-210 Survey of American Literature 1(3) 
Lrr-21 1 Survey of American Literature 11 (3) 

• 12 wedit hours of courses dealing with some aqiect of 
American Kfe selected firm a single department or related 
departments 

• 9 additional credit hours in American studies (AMST-xxx) 
courses at the 300 level or above, excluding independent 
study and internships 

• One of the following as a senior project: 



AMST^IO Senior Thesis I (3) 
AMSr-4 1 1 Senior Thesis H (3) 
AMSr-491 Internship in American Studies (3) 
University Honors Program 

Students in tiie University Honors Program have ttie opportu- 
nity to graduate with Ltaiversity Honors in ttie major. To do so, 
students corrplete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors work in 
the departmait arxl, upon departmental recommendatioD, gradu- 
ate with University Honors in the major The department's 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmaital options. 

Minor in American Studies 

• 22 credit hours with grades ofC or better and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• AMSr-206 American Dreams/American Lives (3) 

• AMSr-400 Intapre ting American Culture (4) 

• ANTH-251 Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology (3) 

• 12 credit hours in American studies (AMST-xxx) at the 300 
level or above 



Anthropology 



Chair William Leap 

FuU-Tune Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a QL. Burkhart, QL. Harris, 

C.W.N&Ne1t,Jr 

Professor D.B Koenig, WL. Leap, B. W^ams 

Associate Professor R.J. Dent, J. Oero, L. Gill 

Assistant Professor P. Geller, C. Howe, S. McDonic, 

S. Prince, E. Smifti, R. Watkins 

Public Anthropologist in Residence Q Schafil 

Humans have always constituted their families, sexuahty, 
gendered identities, social gioiqB, religious practices, work, 
play, and artistic expression in dramatically diverse ways. An- 
thropobgistsexpbre everyday experience, cultural difference, 
arrd power relaticns in order to urxlerstand this diversity in the 
context of local and global histories. Stark inequalities are also 
part of the human experierKc, and anthropologists seek to un- 
cover fee ideologies arxl processes that create and mask those 
inequalities. 

Different kinds of anthropologists explore difference and 
power fiom specialized perspectives. Cultural and social an- 
thropotogists search for the cormections between cultural 
meanings and lived human experience. Archaeologists probe 
tiiB remains of past civilizations for significant transfomstions 



in the ways commmities orgarrized their homes and Istor. Bio- 
logical anthropologists document the dynamics ofhuman evolu- 
tion arxl study nutrition, health, and iUness in their cultural 
contexts. Linguists examine the varied texts that spealfsrs create 
for clues that language holds to bierardiy and personal exjres- 
sioiL 

Anthropology students examine past and present socidies to 
bring anthropological and archaeological theory and practice to 
ongoing struggles against racism, sexian, homophobia, inequal- 
ity, poverty, environmental degradation, and ethnic/cultural 
genocide. The undergraduate anfliropology program at Ameri- 
can Urriversity introduces students to all four sub fields of anfliro- 
pology, and many students specialize in one. Graduate programs 
itKlude the MA. in PrjbUc Anthropology and doctoral concen- 
trations in cultural/social anthropology, ardiaeobgy; and race, 
gender, and social justice. A Certificate in Public Anthropobgy 
is oflFered for bofli uridergraduates and graduate students. All 
prograrrB stress active, coc^Krative learning, for anthropobgy 
opens up many exciting questions for discusion and debate. 

Students are encouraged to learn outside the classroom, 
through internships and job jJacements, field trips and experien- 
tial classes, and study abroad Wadiington, D.C. offers many op- 
portunities for students to broaden their leaming through 
museums and research facilities and the ridi community life of 
the city. 



B.A. in Anthropology 



Admission to the Program 

FoitibI admission to the major by the department's under- 
graduate studies director requires a cumulative grade point av- 
erage of 20O (on a 4.00 scale) and a grade poiit average of 2.00 
or higher in two anthropology couises. 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or flie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloften couises, consisting of one fbundationcouTseaod 
one second-level course in an approved sequence fromeadi 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 48 credit hours with grades of C or be*ter 
Course Requirements 

Core Courses (24 credit hours) 

• ANTlt250/ANTO-250G Human Origins 5:2 (3) 

• ANTH-251 Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology (3) 

• ANTH-253 Introduction to Archaeology (3) 

• ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 

• ANTH-3 39 Culture Area Analysis (3) 

• ANTH-440 Contemporary Ethnographies (3) 

• ANTH-450AnthropobgyofPower(3) 

• ANTH-5 52 Anthropological Research Methods (3) 

Fieldwork (3 credit hours) 

• 3 credits from the following 

ANTH-3 92 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3-9) 
ANTH-491 Internship in Anthropology (1-6) 
ANTH-5 50 EthnogrE^hic Field Methods (3) 
ANTH-560 Summer Field School: Archaeology (3-9) 
Other fieldwork, including study abroad programs or 
community service learning projects, may be used with tte 
approval of the student's advisor 
Elective Courses (21 credit hours) 

• 21 credit hours from the following with a minimum of 12 
credit hours at the 300 level or above: 
ANTH-210/ANTH-210G Roots of Racismand Intenacial 

Harmony 3:2 (3) 
ANTH-21 5/ANTH-215G Sex, Gender, and Culture 3:2 (3) 
ANTH-220/ANTH-220G Uving in Multicultural 

Societies 3:2 (3) 
ANTH-225/ANTH-225G Language and Human 

Experience 1:2(3) 
ANTH-230/ANTH-230G hidia: Us Living Traditions 3:2 (3) 



Anthropology 79 

ANTH-235/AKm-235G Early America: 

The Buried Past 22 (3) 
ANTH-3 34 Environmental Justice (3) 
ANTH-337 Anthropotogy of Genocide (3) 
ANTH-3 50 Special Topics (3) 
ANTH-430 Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion (3) 
ANTH-431 Taboos (3) 
ANTH-439 Classics of Anttiropology (3) 
ANTH-498 Senior Thesis in Anthropology (3-6) 
ANTH-5 31 Topics in Archaeology (3) 
ANTH-5 32 Changing Culture (3) 
ANTH-5 34 Class and Culture (3) 
ANTH-5 35 Ethnicity and Nationalism (3) 
ANTH-5 37 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-543 Anthropotogy of Development (3) 
ANTH-544 Topics in Pubhc Anthropology (3) 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Ptxjgram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the rtajor To do 
so, students complete 1 2 hours of advanced-level Honors work 
in the department, including a Seruor Honors Thesis and, upon 
departmental recommendation, graduate with Uruversity 
Honors in the major The department's Ifcnois coordinator ad- 
vises students in the Uruversity Horxirs Program regarding de- 
partmental options. 

Minor in Anthropology 

• IScredit hours with grades of Cor better and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to flie minor 

Course Requirements 

• ANTH-25 1 Perspectives in Cultural Anthropology (3) 

• Two courses from the following: 
ANTH-250/ANTH-250G Human Origins 5:2 (3) 
ANTH-253 Introduction to Arehaeology (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 

• An additional 9 credit hours at the 300 level or above diosoi 
in consultation with an advisor 

Minor in Applied Anthropology 

• 18 credit hours with grades ofC or better withat least 12credit 
hours unique to fee minor 

Course Requirements 

• ANTH-251 Perspectives inCultural Anthropology (3) 

• ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) (taken 
after completion of at least 6 credit hours in anthtxspobgy) 

• An additional 1 2 credit hours with at least 9 credit hours at the 
300 level or above, chosen from at least two subfields 
(socio-cultural, linguistic, ardiaeological, {Aysical) in 
consultation witti an advisor. 



80 College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate Certificate in Public 
Anthropology 

Admission to the Program 

Op>en to undergraduate degree and nondegree students. 
Students must complete 6 credit houre witii grades of C or 
better in anthropdogy couises at the 200 fevel or above, or 
have intemfhip experience in a related field before beginning 
couree work for the certificate. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 15 credithoursofappiovedcourse work with atleastQcredit 
houisat the 300-level or above, with gradesofC or better. 
Grades of C- or D in catificate piDgram courses are not 
accepted towaid the fiilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although diese grades will be incliukd in the calculation of 
theGPA. Studaits mist have at leastaS.OGPAincertificEte 
oouises in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate pro grams must take a rrnnimum o f 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-montti period and complete the certificate in 
four years. Intanational studaits mist enroll in 12 credit 
horns each semester (except for sumner). A maxiniim of 3 
credit hours earned at an accredited college or university 
may be apphed toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• AKm-541 Anthropology and State Policy (3) 
or 

ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 

• 12 credit hours in public anthropology courses at fee 300 
level or above, chosen in consultation with the student's 
faculty advisor 

Combined B.A. in Anthropology and 
M.A. in Public Anthropology 

This program allows quahfied students to cornplete both 
the B.A. in Anthropology and the M.A in Public An&ropol- 

ogy- 

Admission to the Program 

The standards for admission to the undergraduate major 
must fiist be satisfied. Undergraduate majois ordinarily appiy 
for admissico to ttie combined BATM. A. pnagram at the end 
oftheirjunior year Admission dedsions foUow the procedures 
uaed to evaluate gradu^e applicants to ttie MA. program. In- 
terest in this program should be discussed with membeis of flie 
faculty before formal appUcation is begun. 

Requirements 

• All requirements for the B.A. in Anttiropology 
Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours of 
approved 500-fevel course woik in anthropology to satisfy 
the requirements for both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in PubKc Anthropology, 
including a minimum of 24 credit hours completed in 



residence in graduate status after the undergraduate degree has 
beenawaided. 

M.A. in Public Anthropology 

Admission to the Program 

AppUcants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for admission to graduate study. Admission is based on acadonic 
record, two academic letters of reference, and an exanple of the 
appUcant's woik, e.g., a term paper. Graduate Record Examina- 
tion (GRE) scores are required. 

Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate woric 

Students focus their studies in either cultural/social 
anthropology or archaeology 

• One written corep^ensive examination, approprjate to the 
student's concentration 

• A thesis or nontiiesis option of two substantial research papers 
prepared in conjunction with advanced courses or research 
seminars, read and approved by two faculty manbers and the 
department chaff 

Tracks 

Cultural/Sodal Anthropology or Archeology 

Course Requirements 

• ANTH-552 Aiihropological Research Methods (3) 

• ANTH-632 Contemporaiy Theory: Culture, Power, 

History (3) 
Cultural/Social Anthropology 

• 18 credit hours from the following as approved by the 
student's advisor, with no more than 6 credit hours from 
ANTH-691 and ANTH-797: 

ANTH-531 Topics in Archaeology (3) 
ANTH-532 Changing Culttire (3) 
ANTH-534 Class aal Culture (3) 
ANTH-535 Ethnicity andNationalian (3) 
ANTH-5 37 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
ANTH-541 Anthropology and State Policy (3) 
ANTH-542 Reinveiiing y^)plied Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-543 Anthropology of Development (3) 
ANTH-5 44 Topics in Public Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-5 50 Ethnographic Field Mettiods (3) 
ANTH-631 Foundations of Social and Cultural 

Anthropotogy (3) 
ANTH-634 Foundations of Archaeology (3) 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
ANTH-637 Discourse, Narrative, arri Text (3) 
ANTH-640 Current Issues in Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-691 Internship in Anthropology (1^ 
ANTH-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (6) (thesis option) 

• 6 credits hours ofapproved graduate course woricfiomanother 
discqjline, such as history, sociology, commmication, or 
international service. 



Anthropology 81 



Archeology 

• ANTH-533 Cultural Resources Management (3) or 
ANTH-536 Archaeology aol Politics (3) 

• ANTH-634 Foundations of Archaeology (3) 

• 12 credit hours from the following as approved by the 
student's advisor. Students without field archaeology 
experience are strongly encouraged to take ANTH-560 
Summer Field School: Archaeology: 

ANTH-531 Topics in Archaeology (3) 

ANTH-5 32 Changing Culture (3) 

ANTH-533 Cultural Resources Management (3) (if not 

t^en to meet requirement above) 
ANTH-5 34 Class and Culture (3) 
ANTH-5 35 Ethnicity and Nationalism (3) 
ANTH-5 36 Archaeology and Pohtics (3) (if not taken to 

meet requirement above) 
ANTH-5 37 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
ANTH-541 Anthropobgy and State Policy (3) 
ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-543 Anthropotogy of Development (3) 
ANTH-544 Topics in Public Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-5 50 Ethnographic Field Methods (3) 
ANTH-560 Sumnsr Field School: Archaeology (3-9) 
ANTH-5 90 Independait Reading in Anthropology (1-6) 
ANTH-631 Foundations of Social and Cultural 

Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
ANTH-637 Discourse, Narrative, and Text (3) 
ANTH-639 Culture Area Analysis (3) 
ANTH-640 Current Issues in Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-690 Independent Study Project in Anthropology (1-6) 
ANTH-691 Internship in Anthropology (1-6) 
ANTH-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (6) (thesis option) 

• 6credit hours ofapproved graduate course work from anofter 
discipline, such as history, sociology, communication, 
economics, mathematics and statistics, computer science, 
information systons, business, and public afifairs. 

Ph.D. in Anthropology 

Admission to the Program 

Applicants must meet the nrinimum university requiremaits 
for admission to graduate study. Admission is based on aca- 
demic record, two academic letters of reference, and an exam- 
ple of the applicant's work, e.g., a term paper. GRE scores 
should be sent directly to the department 

Degree Requirements 

• 72 credit hours of approved graduate work 

Studerts entering the program wfth anM.A. in Anthropology 
earned elsewhere must conplete at least 30 credit hours of 



course work and no more than 12 credit hous of dissertation 
oedit in residence. 

• Two lang\iages or one language and statistical or computer 
analysis as a tool of research 

• Four comprehensive examinations, at least two written and at 
least one oral 

• !!)isserlation and oral defense 

• Field work is a component of dissertation research 
Concentrations 

Cultural/Social Anteopology, Ardjeology, or Race, Gender, 
and Social Justice 
Course Requirements 

Cultural/Social Anthropology or Archeology 

• ANTH-631 Foundations of Social and Cultural 

Anthropology (3) 

• ANTH-634 Foundations of Archaeology (3) 

• ANTH-637 Discourse, Narrative, and Text (3) 

• ANTH-799 Doctoral Dissertation Seminar (6) 

Race, Gender, and Social Justice 

• ANTH-632 Contemporary Theory: Culture, Power and 

History (3) 

• ANTH-635 Race, Gealer and Social Justice (3) 

• 12 credit hours in race, gender, and sodal justice course woric 
from the following, chosen in consultation with flie student's 
advisor 

ANTH-531 Topics in Archaeology : 

Archaeology and Politics (3) 
ANTH-5 32 Changing Culture (3) 
ANTH-5 35 Ethnicity and Nationalism (3 ) 
ANTH-5 37 Topics in Language and Culture: 

Language, Culture, and Educaticn (3) 
ANTH-541 Anthropobgy and State Policy (3) 
ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 
ANTH-544 Topics in PubUc Anttiropology ; 

Environmental Justice (3) 

Human Ri^ts (3) 
ANTH-637 Discourse, Narrative, and Text (3) 
ANTH-640 Current Issues in Anthropology (3) 

• 15 credit hours of course woric from at least two othw 
teaching units, induding the Departments of Justice, Law and 
Society; History; and Sociology; and the School of 
International Service 

• ANTH-691 Internship in Anthropology (3) or other 
practical experience in race, gender and social justice 

• ANTH-799 Doctoral Dissertation Seminar (6) including a 
3-credit hour capstone seminar in race, gender and social 
justice 



82 College of Arts and Sciences 

Graduate Certificate in Public 
Anthropology 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution Students must conplete 6 credit 
hours with grades of C or better in anthropology courses at fee 
200 level or above, or have internship experience in a related 
field before beginning course woric for the certificate. 
Certificate Requirements 

• IScredithoursofapprovedcourse woik withatleast6credit 
houis at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or betta- 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
acce^d toward the fulfillment of certificate requirements. 



although ttiese grades will be included in 4ie calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate pmDgrams must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during eadi 12-nionlh period and complete the certificate in 
four yearsi International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
houis earned at an accredited college or university may be 
appUed toward the certificate as transfer credit 
Course Requirements 

• ANTH-541 Anthropology and State Policy (3) 
or 

ANTH-542 Reinventing Applied Anthropology (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours in graduate public anttnopology courses with at 
least 6 credit hours at flie 600 level or above, diosen in 
consultation with the student's faculty advisor 



Arab Studies 



Coordinator Mary Ann Fay, Department of Sociology 

The interdisciplinary program in Arab studies draws on the 
distinguished faculty in the College of the Arts and Sciences, 
Sdiool of International Service, and School of Pubhc Affairs 
who teach courses related to the Arab \Mjrld. In both the minor 
and undergraduate certificate, students take two core courses 
that introduce the scholarly study of Islam and the modem his- 
tory and contemporary sociology of the Arab worid. Five other 
courses sue selected fitm history, culture, and society, and in- 
ternational studies. For the certificate, students also take two 
courses in Arabic. 

Minor in Arab Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the minor requires a minimum grade 
point average of 200 (on a 4.00 scale) and approval offhe pro- 
gram advisor 

Requirements 

• 21 credit hours with grades of C or bettw wifli at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor and at least 9 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• SIS-245/SIS-245G The Wbrld of Islam 3:2 (3) 

• SOCY-225/SOCY-225G Contenporary Arab World 3:2 (3) 

• Five courses fiom the following, with at least one selected 
fiom each groiq): 

History, Culture, and Society 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
ECON-358 Economics of the World Regions: 
The Arab Economies (3) 



GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
HIST-248 Transformations of the Middle East (3) 
SOCY-531 Regional Studies in Social Change (3) (topics) 
International Studies 
SIS-264 Contenporary Middle East (3) 
SIS-365 Arab-Israeli Relations (3) 
SIS-571 Irtemational Relations ofthe Middle E«t I (3) 

Undergraduate Certificate in 

Arab Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Open to undergraduate degree and nondegree students. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 29 credit hours of approved course work with at least 15 
credit hours at the 300-level or above with grades of C or 
better. 

Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted towani the fulfiUment of certificate requirements, 
although fliese grades wUl be included in ttie calculation of the 
GPA. Students must haw at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 12-montfa poiod and corrplete the certificate in 
four years International students must enroll in 1 2 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 6 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit 
Course Requirements 

• SIS-245/SIS-245G Ihe World of Islam 3:2 (3) 

• SOCY-225/SOCY-2250 Contenporary Arab Wcrld 3:2 (3) 



Art 83 



• Five courses from the following, with at least one selected 
fiotn each group 
History, Culture, and Society 

ANTH-3 39 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
BCON-358 Economics of the World Regions: 

The Arab Economies (3) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and FVocesses in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
HIST-248 Transformationsof the Middle East (3) 



SOC Y-531 Regional Studies in Social Change (3) (topics) 
International Studies 

SIS-26» Contemporary Middle East (3) 
SIS-365 Arab-Israeh Relations (3) 
SIS-571 hiteraational Relations of the Middle East I (3) 
• Two courses ftomthe following with grades of Cor better 

ARAB-102 Arabic Elementary I (4) 

ARAB-103 Arabic Elementary n (4) 

ARAB-202 Arabic Intermediate I (4) 

ARAB-203 Arabic Inteimedieie II (4) 



Art 



Chair Luis Silva 

Full-Time Faculty 

University Professor Emeritus B.L Summerford 

Professor Emeritus/a MJD. Garrard, S. Lewis, S. ftce, 

L. ftnay 

Professor N. Broude.D. Kimes,M. Oxman 

Associate Professor EmerituVa M. Graham, 

M. Ifirano, C. Ravenal 

Associate Professor D. Kahn, K Langa, C. Monies, L. Silva 

Assistant Professor K. Butler, Z. Charlton, T. Doud, 

R. ftcker, J. Ring, L Silver, K. Reaiick, I. Larrpe, W. Willis 

The Department of Art encorr^asses the creative activities 
of the fine arts (painting, sculpture, printmaking, and 
multimedia), the artistic ^jpUcations of design, and the theoreti- 
cal and historical concerns of art history. These conplementaiy 
programs function together, so that the student gains not only 
deptti ofknowledge in a chosen spedaltybut also the breadth of 
experience thd yields understanding of artistic traditions, val- 
ues, cultural awareness, and conterrporay issues. A faculty of 
exhibiting artists, pnacticing designers, pubUshed and respected 
historians, and strong studio programs focused on giving stu- 
dents facihty with materials and faniharity wrdx visual and the- 
oretical concq)ts make the art department, in effect, an art 
sdiool within a university. 

The Art Department offas the Bachelor of Arts in Art Ms- 
tory. Graphic Design, or Studio Art, all of wiiich ctin also be 
takoi as minors, a Bachebr ofFine Arts ,the EJachebr of Arts in 
Multimedia, and the M.F.A. in Studio Art. 

The study of art awakens the ability to undertake a serious 
expbration of visual form, opens the mind to &e special mean- 
ings encoded in visual language, and develops the creative, ex- 
pressive, and analytic abihties inherent in all people. In studio 
couises, students lean to see with acuity, to exjiore forms in na- 
ture or fiom the imagination, and to make images fliat are for- 
mally coherent and personally expressive. In art history courses, 
students are introduced to the art of civilizations past and pres- 
ent, leam how to inteipret works of art critically and historically, 
and discover how art functions both to reflect and to shape so- 
cial values. In graphic design courses, students develop an un- 



derstanding of the dynamic power of visual imagery and leam 
to qjply flieir knowledge of 4ie fcrmal elements of art to the 
production of effective graphic conmunicaticn. 

The multidisciplinary multimedia program prepares gradu- 
ates to design and develop multimedia presentations froma fine 
arts perspective. This program integrates text, graphics, anima- 
tion, audio, and video. Reflecting the different skiUs required to 
accomplish this integration, it blends courses, practices, and 
teclmologies fiom graphic design, computing, and oomirunica- 
tion. 

American University's new Katzen Arts Center provides our 
students with a state of the art facility for the investigation and 
pursuit of botti the visual and performing arts. The Art Depart- 
ment's offices, classDoms, and studios are equipped for the in- 
struction of drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, design, 
coroputer graphics, multimedia, and ceramics 

As weU as multiple p)erformance stages and a full array of 
classroom and studio fadhties, the Katzen Arts Center contains 
more than 30,000 square feet of gallery space. The many 
world-class museinns in ^^isiiington, D.C. also form an iitfegral 
conponent of students' experience at American University. 

Graduates with art degrees become practicing artists, teach- 
ers, musaim professionals, architectural preserv^onists, art 
consultants, graphic designers, and more. 

The Katzen Art Coiter also maintains an inpresave nii- 
seum including the Watkins and Katzen collections, with works 
by Avery, Chagall, Dove, Klee, Kokoshka, Marin, Matisse, and 
Picasso, and a vital rotating schedule of exhibitionsL 

In additicn to ttie full-time faculty, each jear fee studio pro- 
gram brings nationally and internationally distinguished visit- 
ing artists-in-residence to the department, including OUve 
Ayhens, Gregory Amenoff, Frances Barth, Jake Bertlot, 
Susanna Coffey, Diana Coojjer, Stuart Diamond, Tara Dono- 
van, Andrew Forge, Sam Gilliam, Judy Glantzman, Glenn 
Goldberg, Margaret Grimes, Diana Guerrero -Macia, Bill 
Jensen, Siiriey Kaneda, Catherine Murjiiy, Judy Pfaff^ Kather- 
ine Porter, HanneUne Rogebeig, Roger Tibbetts, Tracy MiUw, 
James Sheehan, Pat Steii; John Walker, Stephan Westfall, and 
othas. 

An intemationaUy-prominent art history faculty and strong 
curriculum give the art history major a solid grounding in art as 



84 CoDege of Arts ai d Sciences 



a historical and hum! nistic discipline in an enviioniDBnt that 
provides continuing c intact with art in the making Because of 
the university's locat: m in one of the najorart c^tals of fee 
world and its jsroxim ty to Washington's great nuseums and 
art collections, aU pn grams afford stixknts the advantage of 
imnediate experienc : with art masterpieces of the past and 
present 

The design currio him is highly stnictured and sequential 
to provide studeils ' /ith the theory and practice of graphic 
communications desi jn apjiicable to many purposes, as well 
as the development of professional production methods. 
Courses CO ver publicj tion and editorial design, corporate idai- 
tity, packaging, iUusti dion, poster design, miltimBdia, experi- 
ence and interactive design, etc. Along with creative and 
tedinical skills, verb^ 1 and analytical abilities are developed 
through class critiqu ;& Through internships with designers 
working in the field, s udents learn to balance ttie ideal creative 
solution with the reah y of budget constraints, technical limita- 
tions, and deadlines. 

An important obje ;tive of the department is to prepare stu- 
deats for careers in ti le arts. Given the sound theoretical and 
tedmical bases of our arograms, graduates find that a wealth of 
individual career opp itunities awaits ttiem. Depaiding on ttie 
specific discipline pi isued, they have become professional 
painters and sculptor , teachers, critics, graphic designers, il- 
lustrators, and exhibii on design ^jecialists. Graduates also go 
on to careers in rrus- um and gallery work, visual resources, 
and historic pireserval on. 

B.A. in Art Hi tory 



Admission to the P 

Formal admissiot 
pfetion (grades of C < 
courses and departmt 

University Requirf 

• Atotalofl20ared 

• 6 credit hours of c 

• 3 credit hours of c 
examination 

General Educatioc 

• A total often ooui 
and one second-le 
each of the fivecu 

• No more than 6 ■ 
discipline 

Major Requiremei 

• 54 aedit hours wi 
24 of the last 30 
taken in residence 
history and 6 cred 



-ogram 

to the mqor requires satisfactory com- 
rbetter)of 12 credit hours of art history 
(ital approval. 

ments 

t hours 

nege writing 

illege mathematics or the equivalent by 

Requirements 

es, corsisting of one foundation course 
el course in an approved sequenoe from 
ricular areas 
redit hours may be taken in the same 

ts 

1 grades of C or better 

dit hours in the major program mist be 

18 credit hours of which mist be in art 

hours in related fields or studio. 



Course Requirements 

• ARTH-lOO/AKTH-lOOOEuropeanArt FromCaveto 

Cattedral2:l (3) 

• ARTH-1 01 European Art Renaissance to flie Present (3) 

• ARTH-500 Approaches to Art History (3) 

• 3 credit hours in each of four periods: 
Ancient 

ARTH-396 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 
ARTH-520 Seminar in Art History (3) (appropriate topic) 
ARTH-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 

Medieval 

ARTH-303 Medieval Art (3) 

ARTH-308 Gothic Art (3) 

ARTH-396 Selected Topics (3) with pennissian of advisor 

ARTH-520 Serrinar in Art History (3) (appropriate topic) 

ARTH-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 

Renaissance 

ARTH-205/ARrH-205G Art of the Renaissance 2;2 (3) 
ARTH-396 Selected Topfcs (3) with permission of advisor 
ARTH-513 Italian Fainting: Early Renaissance (3) 
ARTH-514 Italian Painting: High Renaissance (3) 
ARTH-5 14 Italian Flainting: Late Raiaissance (3) 
ARTH-520 Seminar in Art History (3) (tqjpropriate topic) 
ARTH-596 Selected Topics (3) with permissioo of Edvisor 

Modem 

ARTH-210/ARrH-210G Modem Art: Nineteenth and 

Twentieth Centuries 1:2 (3) 
ARTH-331 Visual Arts in the IWted States to 1890 (3) 
ARTH-3 32 Visual Aits in flie United States: 1890 to 1945 (3) 
ARTH-333 Visual Arts since 1945 (3) 
ARTH-396 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 
ARTH-508 Painting: Rococo through Impressionian (3) 
ARTH-5 10 Painting: Post-frnpressionian to Expressionism (3) 
ARTH-511 Pairting: Cubiam through Surrealism (3) 
ARTH-520 Seminar in Art History (3) (appropriate topic) 
ARlH-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of advisor 

• 15 additional credit hours in art history with at least two 
courses at flie 500 level 

• 6 credit hours in studio from the foUowing: 
ARTS-IOO/ARTS-IOOG Art: The Studio 

Expaience 1 : 1 (3) 
ARTS-205/ARTS-205G The Artist's Perspective: Drawing 

1:2(3) 
ARTS-210/AKrS-210G The Artist's Per^jective: Painting 

1:2(3) 
ARTS-215/ARTS-215G Ihs Artist's Per^jective: Sculpture 

1:2(3) 
ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 
ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 
ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 
AR'IS-363 Relief Printmaking Studio (3) 



Art 85 



• 12 credit hours at the 300 level or above from one of the 
following fields: American studies, anthropology, history, 
literature, misic, or philosophy. Couree selections mist be 
related to the major said to each other and nust be approved 
by the faculty. 

Note: Students contemplating graduate study in art history arc 
advised to attain a reading knowledge ofFrencfa, Italian, or Ciur- 
man to the intennediate level (or equivalent of 1 2 credit hours at 
the college level). 
Special Opportunities 

• Internships in local agencies, museums, galleries, and 
libraries are permitted with departmental approval, but are 
limited to 3 credit hours unless taken as electivea 

Univergity Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with Lhiva^ity Honors in the major To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors woric 
in the department and, upaa departmoital leconmendation, 
graduate with University Honors in the major The department 's 
Honors coordinator advises students in the Uiiveisity Honors 
Program regarding departmental options 

B.A. in Graphic Design 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the majorrequires satisfactory comj^e- 
tion (grades of C+ or better) of the following foundation 
couises: 

GDES-200 Introduction to Graphic Design (3) 

GDES-210 Introduction to Typogr^hy (3) 

GDES-220 Computer Literacy for Design (3) 

COMM-330 Principies of Hiotography (3) 
University Requirements 

• Atotalofl20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouises,consistingofonefoundationcouiseand 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 54 credit hours with grades of C or better 

24 of the last 30 credit hours in the nBJor program mist be 
taken in residence, of which 18 credit hours must be in design 
and 3 credit hours in art history or studio. 
All students will submit a portfolio for departmental 
evaluation prior to beginning their senior year. The 
department may issue formal warnings to students 
performing at marginal levels. 



Tracks 

Print Media or Experience I>;sign and Multimedia 
Course Requirements 

• ARTH-105/ARTH-105O Art: Tte Historical 

Experience 1:1 (3) 

• CX)MM-330PrirKiples of Photography (3) 

• CK)ES-200 Introduction to Graphic Design (3) 

• GDES-21 Introduction to Typography (3) 

• GDES-220 ConputerLiteiacy for Deagn (3) 

• GDES-230 Graphic Design History (3) 

• GDES-300 Intermediate Typogt^hy (3) 

Print Media 

• GDES-3 10 Print Design and the Con^xiter (3) 

• GDES-320 Design and Photography (3) 

• GDES-400 Advanced Design I: Systems Design (3) 

• CaDE&420 Advanced Design U: Narrative Design (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following 

GDES-31 5 Experience Design and the Computer (3) 

GDES-325 Kinetic and Sequential Graphics (3) 

GDES-350 niusttation (3) 

GDES405 UserExpaience Design I (3) 

GDE&425 User Expoience Design H (3) 

GDES450 Packaging Design (3) 

GDES-490 Independmt Study Project (1-6) with 

department approval 
GDES-491 Internship (1-6) with department approval 

• 12 credit hours frcan the following, witti at least 3 credit hours 
fiom each set of courses: 

Set One 

ARTS-lOO/ARTS-lOOGArt; The Studio 

Experience 1:1 (3) 
ARTS-205/ARTS-205G Tte Artist's Pferqjective: Drawing 

1:2(3) 
ARTS-210/ARTS-210G The Artist's Pfcrspective: Paitting 

1:2 (3) 
ARTS-215/ARTS-215G The Artist's Perspective: Sculpture 

1:2(3) 
ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 
ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 
ARTS-344 Ceramics Studio (3) 
ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 
ARTS-363 Rehef Prinlmaking Studio (3) 
ARTS-364 Intaglio Studio (3) 
ARTS-520 Advanced Printtmking (3) 
Set Two 

ARTH-205/ARTH-205G Art of ttie Renaissance 2:2 (3) 
ARTH-210/ARTH-210G Modem Art: Nineteenfli and 

Twentieth Centuries 1:2 (3) 
ARTH-215/ARTH-215G Aichitechire: Wadiington and the 

\\forldl:2(3) 



86 CoDege of Arts and Sciences 



Set Three 
COMM-401 Legal Aspects ofCommunicatioa (3) 
COMM-523 Intermediate Photography (3) 
COMM-525 Advanced Photography (3) 
COMM-529 Large Format Photogr^y and Studio 

Lighting (3) 
Experience Design and Multimedia 

• GDES-315 Experience Design and 4ie Computer (3) 

• GDES-325 Kinetic aid Sequential Graphics (3) 

• GDES-405 User Experience Design I (3) 

• GDES-425 User Experience Design n (3) 

• 9 credit hours from ttie following: 
GDES-310 Print Design and the Computer (3) 
GDES-320 Design and Ptotography (3) 
GDES-350 Illustration (3) 

GDES-400 Advanced Design I Systems Desigp (3) 
GDES-420 Advanced Design 11: Nanative Design (3) 
GDES-450 Packaging Design (3) 
GDES-490 Independent Study Project (1-6) with 

department approval 
GDES-491 Internship (1-6) with departrcBnt ^jproval 

• 12 credit hours from the following, with at least 3 credit 
hoius ftxMneach set of courses: 

Set One 

COMM-33 1 Film and Video Production I (3) (prerequisite: 

COMM-105 Visual Literacy) 
COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 
COMM-401 Legal Aspeds of Communication (3) 
COMM-435 hitroductionto Studio Television (3) 

(prerequisite: OOMM-105 Visual Literacy) 
COMM-520 Mstory of Animation (3) 
COMM-523 hitermediate Photography (3) 
COMM-525 Advanced Photography (3) 
COMM-529 Large Format Photography and Studio 

Lighting (3) 
Set Two 

ATBC-lOl Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) 
ArEC-102 Audio Technology Laboratory (1 ) 
CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 
CSC-28 1 hitroductico to Computer Science n (3) 
CSC-435 Web Programming (3) 
PERF-1 1 (VPERF- 1 lOG Lhderstanding Music 1 : 1 (3) 
Set Three 

ARTH-205/AKrH-205G Art of tiie Renaissance 2:2 (3) 
ARTH-210/AKrH-210G Modem Art: Nineteenth and 

Twentieth Centuries 1:2 (3) 
AR'IH-215/AKrH-215G Architecture: \V&shingtonand 

the World 1:2 (3) 
ARIS-IOO/AKTS-IOOG Art Ihe Studio 

Experience 1:1(3) 
ARTS-205/AKrS-205G The Artist's Per^ctive: Drawing 
1:2(3) 



ARTS-210/AKrS-210G Tlie Artist's Perspective: Painting 

1:2(3) 
AR'IS-215/AKrS-215G The Artist's Perspective: Sculpture 
1:2(3) 
University Honors Program 

Students in tiie Uni veraty Honors Program have the opportu- 
nity to graduate with Ltaivereity Honors in ttie major. To do so, 
students conplete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors wodc in 
the department and, upon departmental recommendation, gradu- 
ate with University Honors in the major. The department's 
Honors cooidinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program residing departmental options. 

B.A. in Studio Art 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires satisfactory comple- 
tion (grades of C or better) of 1 2 credit hours of studio courses 
and departmental approval 
University Requirements 

• Atotal of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the ecjuivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftenccurses,consistingof one foundation oourseand 
one second-level course in an apfSDved sequence from each of 
the five cuiricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 54 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Areas of Specialization 

Drawing, Painting, Printmakir^, Sculpture, or Installaticm 
Course Requirements 

• ARTH-IOO/AFTH-IOOG European Art From Cave to 

Cathedral 2:1 (3) 

• ARTH-lOl European Art Renaissance to Present (3) 

• AR'IS-205/ARTS-205G The Artist's Perspective: 

Drawing 1:2 (3) 

• ARTS-2 10/ARTS-210G The Artist 's Perspective: 

Painting 1:2 (3) 

• ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 

• ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 

• ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 

• ARTS-363 Relief Piintmaking Studio (3) 
or 

AR're-364 IntagUo Studio (3) 

• ARTS-400SemorSeminar(3)(takenforatotalof6credit 
hours) 



Art 87 



• 12 credit hours fiom tbe following including 9 credit houis 
fiom the student's area of specialization and 3 credit houn; 
from aiothff area 

ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 
ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 
ARTS-344 Ceramics Studio (3) 
ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 
ARTS-363 Relief Printmaking Studio (3) 
ARTS-364 IntagHo Studio (3) 
ARTS-520 Advanced Printmaking (3) 
ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 
ARTS-561 Drawing Practicum 11 (3) 

• 3 credit hoiK in art history (ARTH) 

• 3 additionalcredithouis in art history cH-fromtiie following: 
OOMM- 1 (KVCOMM-l OOG Understaoling 

Mass Media 4; 1 (3) 
COMM-10VCOMM-105G Visual Literacy 1 ; 1 (3) 
COMM-209 Communication and Society (3) 
COMM-5 1 1 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-5 17 History of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
PHIL-230/FHIL-230G Meaning and Purpose in the 

Arts 1:2 (3) 

• 6 credit hours of electives; additional courses from the 
student's area of specialization are recommended 

Area of Specialization 

MultimBdia 
Course Requirements 

• ARTH-IOO/ARTH-IOOG European Art; From Cave to 

Cathedral 2:1 (3) 

• ARTH-101 European Art: Renaissanoe to Presei* (3) 

• ARTS-205/ARTS-205GT1K Artist's Perspective: 

Drawing 1:2 (3) 

• ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 

• ARTS^tOO Senior Seminar (3) (taken for a total of 6 a«dit 
hours) 

• ATEC-lOl Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) 

• COMM-330PriiKiples of Photography (3) 

• COMM-331FilmandVideo Production I (3) 

• COMM-350 Digital InBging (3) 

• COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 

• (3)ES-220 Computer Literacy for Design (3) 

• GDES-3 1 5 Experience Deagn and the Computer (3) 

• MMDD-205 hitioduction to Multimedia History and 
Theory (3) 

• MMDD-300 Multimedia Authoring (3) 

• MMDD-350Corcposing with Media (3) 

• MMDD-405 Multimedia Thesis (3) 

• 3 credit hours in art history (ARTH) or finmthe following: 



OOMM-IOCVCOMM-IOOG Understanding 

Mass Nfedia 4:1 (3) 
CX)MM-10yCOMM-105G Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 
COMM-209Communicatian and Society (3) 
COMM-5 1 1 History of Documentary (3) 
OOMM-5 17 History of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 History of Photography (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
FHIL-230/PHIL-230G Meaning and Purpose in the 
Arts 1:2 (3) 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Ptogram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major To do 
so, students complete 1 2 hours of advanced-level Honore wodc 
in tbe department and, iqjon departmental reconmendation, 
graduate with University Honors in the major The department's 
Honors coordinator advises students in the Ltaiversity Hdikhs 
Program regaiding departmental options. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the program is subject to the approval 
of a portfoUo, evaluation of the academic record, and a pasonal 
interview. Admission depends entirely cm faculty action result- 
ing fit)mthis review. Consideration for ftie BP.A is pemiitted 
only after 1 8 credit hours or three sane steis of studio wodc have 
been coiipleted at American University but before beg innin g 
the senior year 
University Requirements 

• Atotal of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or ftie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencourees, consisting ofonefoundationcouise and 
one second4evel course in an approved sequence fitimeadi 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requiremoits 

• 72 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Areas ofSpecialization 

Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Installation 
Course Requirements 

• ARTH-IOO/ARTH-IOOG European Art From Cave to 

Cathedral 2: 1(3) 

• ARTH-101 European Art: Renaissance to PtBsert (3) 

• ARTS-205/ARTS-205G Tte Artist's Perqaective: 

Drawing 1:2(3) 



College of Arts and Sciences 



• ARTS-aiO/AKTS-ZlOG The Artist's Per^ctive: 

Painting 1;2 (3) 

• ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 

• AR're-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 

• ARTS-3eO Drawing Studio (3) 

• ARTS-363ReliefPrintniaking Studio (3) 
or 

ARTS-364 Intaglio Studio (3) 

• ARTS-400 Senior Seminar (3) (taken fora total of 6credit 
houra) 

• ARTS-560DrawingPracticumI(3) 

• ARTS-Sei Drawing Practicumn (3) 

• 27 credit hours fiom fee following including 18 credit hours 
fiom the student's area of specialization and 9 credit hours 
from another area: 

AR're-320 Painting Studb (3) 
ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 
ARTS-344 Ceramics Studio (3) 
ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 
AR'IS-363 ReKefPrintmddng Studio (3) 
ARTS-364 hitagUo Studio (3) 
ARTS-520 Advanced Printmaking (3) 
ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 
ARTS-561 Drawing Prarticum H (3) 

• 3 credit hours in art history ( ARTH) 

• 3 additional credit hours inarthistoiyor from fee following 
COMM-IOO/OOMM-IOOG Understanding 

Mass Media 4:1 (3) 
COMM-105/OOMM-105G Visual Literacy 1:1 (3) 
COMM-209 Comnimication and Society (3) 
COMM-511 History of DocunButaiy (3) 
COMM-517 Mstoryof Qoss-Cultural CinenB(3) 
COMM-520 Mstory of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 Mstory of Photography (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
PHII^23(VPHIL-230G Meaning and Purpose in fee 

Arts 1:2 (3) 

• 6 credit hours of electives; additional courses fiom fee 
student's area of specialization are lecomnended 

Area of Specialization 

Multimedia 
Course Requirements 

• ARTH-IOO/ARTH-IOOG European Art: From Cave to 

Cattodral2:l (3) 

• ARTH- 101 European Art Renaissance to Present (3) 

• ARTS-205/ARrS-205GTlie Artist's Perspective: 

Drawing 1:2 (3) 

• ARTS-SeO Drawing Studio (3) 

• ARTS-400 Senior Seminar (3) (takai for a total of 6 credit 
houis) 



• ATEC-l 01 Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) 

• COMM-330 Principles ofPhotDgraphy (3) 

• COMM-33 1 Fihn and Video Ptoduction I (3) 

• COMM-350 Digital Inaging (3) 

• COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 

• GDES-220Con5)uta- Literacy for Design (3) 

• GDES-3 1 5 Experience Design and fee Ccsnputer (3) 

• MMDD-205 Introduction to Multimedia Histcry 

and Theory (3) 

• MMDD-300MultinBdia Authoring (3) 

• MMDD-350ConpoeingwifeMedH(3) 

• MMDD-405 MultiiTBdia Thesis (3) 

• 3 credit hours in art history (ARTH) or fiom the following: 
COMM-IOO/COMM-IOOG Uixlerstanding 

Mass Media 4:1 (3) 
COMM-105/COMM-105G Visual Literacy 1 : 1 (3) 
COMM-209 Communication and Society (3) 
COMM-51 1 History of Documentaiy (3) 
COMM-517 History of Ctoss-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 Ffistory of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 History of Hiotography (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
PHII^23(yPIIIL-230G Meaning and Purpose in fee 
Arts 1:2 (3) 
University Honors Program 

Students in fee University Honors Program have fee opportu- 
nity to graduate wife University Hanors in fee major. To do so, 
students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors wodi in 
the department and, upon departmental recommendation, gradu- 
ate wife University Honors in the major The department's 
Honors cooidinator advises students in fee University Honors 
Program residing departmental options. 

B.A. in Multimedia 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires satisfactory comple- 
tion of 6 credit hours of design courses, 6 credit hours of corrput- 
ing courses, and 6 credit hours of communication courses, wife 
an overall grade point average of 3.00 or better. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit horns 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or fee equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencourses,consistingofonefaundationcourseand 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each of 
the five cuiricular areas 

• No more fean 6 credit hours may be taken in fee same 
discipline 



Art 89 



Major Requirenieiits 

• 57 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Reqinremeots 

Groundwork (27 credit hours) 

• ARTH-105/ARTH-105CJ Art; The Historical 

Experience 1:1 (3) 

• ATEC-lOl Fundamentals of Audio Techncdogy (3) 

• COMM-10VCOMM-105G Visual Literacy 1 : 1 (3) 

• COMM-330Pritt;iples of Photography (3) 

• (aDES-200 Introduction to Graphic Design (3) 

• GDES-210 Introduction to Typography (3) 

• GDES-220 Computer Literacy for Design (3) 

• MMDD-205 Introduction to Multimedia History 

and Theory (3) 

• reRF-llO/PERF-llOG Understanding Music 1:1 (3) 

Integration (18 credit hours) 

• COMM-331 Fibnand Video Production I (3) 

• COMM-350 Digital Imaging (3) 

• COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 

• GDES-3 1 5 Experience Deagn and the Conputer (3) 

• MMDD-300 Multimedia Authoring (3) 

• MMDD-350 Conposing with Media (3) 

Emphasis (6 credit hours) 

• 6 credit hours from the following 
ArEC-210 Sound Synthesis I (3) 

ArEC-410 Soxmd Studio Techniques and PTactioe (3) 
CDMM-323 Computer Tedmiques for Cortmunication 

Studies (3) 
COMM-434 Film and Video Production H (3) 
COMM-454 Motion Graphics and Effects I (3) 
CSC -280 Introduction to Computer Sdence I (4) 
CSC -435 \\feb Progranming (3) 
CSC-438 PL/SQL Database Programming (3) 
Cai)ES-300 Intermediate TypograjAiy (3) 
CH)ES-325 Kinetic and Sequential Graphics (3) 
aDES405 User Experience Design I (3) 
Ca5ES-425 User Experience Design H (3) 
Portfolio (6 credit hours) 

• MMDEM05 Multimedia Thesis (3) 

• MMDEM55 Multimedia Semina- (3) 
or 

MMDD-491 Intanshp (3) 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Rogram have the oppor^ 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors woric 
in the dq)artment and, upon departmaital leconmendation, 
graduate with Liiivasity Honors in the major The department's 



Honors coordinator advises students in taiveisity Honois 
F^gramregatdingdepartmental optior 

Minor in Art History 



• 18 credit hours with grades of C or b< at least 12 credit 
hours unique to die minor 

Course Requirements 

• ARTH-IOO/ARTH-IOOG European A rem Cave to 

Cathedral 2: 1(3) 

• ARTH-101 European Art: Renaissance i Resent (3) 

• 3aiedithouisatthe200Qr3001evdand9 redit hours at fee 300 
level or above, ^jpKJved in advance by ai it history advisor 

Minor in Graphic Design 

• 21 credit hours with grades of CcB-bettei and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to ttje minor 

Course Requirements 

• COMM-330PriiKiples of Photography 3) 

• C33ES-200 Introduction to Graphic Desi gn (3) 

• CaZ)ES-21 Introduction to Typography (3) 

• (aDBS-220 Coiqputer Literacy for Dea . n (3) 

• 9 credit hoirs from the following 
aDES-230 Grajiiic Design History (3) 
GDES-300 Intermediate Typography (3 
GDES-3 10 Print Design andtheCortpiiier(3) 
GDES-3 1 5 Eixperience Design and the Computer (3) 
(X)ES-320 Design andPhotogrqjhy (3] 
GDES-325 Kinetic and Sequential Graf hies (3) 
C3)ES-350 Illustration (3) 

GDES400 Advanced Design L Systems Design (3) 
CaDES-405 User Experience Design I (; ) 
GDE&420 Advanced Design 11: Narrative Design (3) 
GDES425 UserExpaience Design U (3) 
CH3ES450 Packaging Design (3) 

Minor in Studio Art 

• 21 credit hours with grades of Cot better and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to fee minor 

Specific recpiiremenfs depend on the s' udent's interest and 
area of concentration, which may inchic e drawing, painting 
printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, installp Hon, ormiltimedia 
Course Requirements 

• 21 credit hours fiom the folbwing approved in advance by a 
studio facility advisor 

ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 
ARTS-340 Sculpture Studio (3) 
ARTS-344 Ceramics Studio (3) 
ARTS-360 Drawing Studio (3) 
ARTS-363 Relief Printmaking Studio (3) 
ARTS-364 totagBo Studio (3) 



90 College of Arts and Sciences 



ARTS-520 Advanced Printmaldng (3) 

ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 

AR1S-561 Drawing Practicum n (3) 

or 

21 credit hours fiDtnthe fcUowing nultinsdia couises 

• ARTS-205/AKrS-205O The Artist's Per^ctive: 

Drawing 1:2 (3) 

• ATEC-lOl Fundamentalsof Audio Technology (3) 

• COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

• COMM-33 1 Fihn and Video Production I (3) 

• GDES-220 Conputer Literacy for Design (3) 

• MMDD-205 Introduction to Multinaedia History 

and Theory (3) 

• MMDD-300 Multimedia Authoring (3) 

M.A. in Art History 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minirmnn university require- 
ments for graduate study, appUcaids should hold a badielor of 
arts degree from an accredited college or university. Studerts 
whose records indicate a strong aptitude for graduate study, but 
whose undeigraduate major was not in art histoiy, will be re- 
quired to conplete at least 24 credit hours of art history before 
being considered for admission to the graduate program Ad- 
mission is based on academic record. Graduate Record Exami - 
nation (ORE) scores, and two letters ofrecomnendation (if the 
undergraduate degree was not earned in the department). 

At the department's discretion, students who have com- 
pleted at least 1 8 oedit hours of art history may be considered 
for adnission and, if admitted, may conplele the 6 credit hour 
deficiency during the course of their M.A. program. 

Part-time students are advised that an MA., which takes at 
least three semesters of full-time study, cannot be competed at 
night or in summer only. 
Special Opportunities 

Individually structured programs in museum training and 
internships in local museums, galleries, agaicies, or libraries 
are available for qualified students with departmental ap- 
proval. 
Curriculum Models 

Curriculum Model I: General History of Western Art. A 
discipline-oriented approach for students who intend to con- 
tinue for a PhD. elsewhere or to teach at the high school or ju- 
nior college level. The program emphasiaes a range of art 
history courses with a convoitional period specialization. 

Curriculum Model 11: Applied Research in Art History. A 
{Hactical-apf^cations a^proEK^h with intensive training in re- 
search and writing for studaits who seek special training for 
museum work, aichitectural surwy, historic preservation re- 
search, etc. The program may indude related course work in 
history, culture, American studies, etc, as well as intonshps 
and field experience. 



Curriculum Model III: Concepts of Art and Art History. A 
problem-oriented approach aimed at depth of understanding of 
art and methods of art history, for students interested in 
cotmoisseur^p and critical analysis, generally with an emphasis 
in painting. The program may include related courses sucfa as 
ARTS-700 Criticism ofPairting, as well as independent reading 
courses in criticism, theory, or historiography. 

Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate woric 

A36-credit hour pro gram with astructuredmusEum internship 
option is available to qualified studaits. 

• Tool of research: intermediate-level French, German, or 
Italian, or reading knowledge of one of these languages 
demonstrated through examination 

• Advancement to candidacyaftwconpletionoflS credit hours 
with a grade point average of 3.00 or higher (an a 4.00 scale) 
and satis&ctory conpletion of the XooX requiranent 

• Two written examinations. 

History of Western Art (Greek to Modem) 
One in the student's field of specialization: medieval art. 
Renaissance art, baroque and rococo art, nineteenth and 
twentietii century art, or art in the United States 

• Two substantial research pap>eis in beu of a thesis, at least one 
paper must originate in a graduate sotdnar and one niist be in 
the student's field of specialization. 

Course Requirements 

• ARTH-500Approadies to Art History (3) 

• ARTH-792 Research Seminar in Art History (3) 

• ARTH-793 Directed Research in Art History (3) or 
ARTH-690 hidependent Study (3) 

• 9 credit hours in the field of specialization 

• Remaining 1 2 cniedit hours as approved 

Note: 6 additional credit hours of course work are required if nni- 
seum training or more tiian one intem^p is selected. 

M.F.A. in Studio Art 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requiranents 
for graduate study, apfdicants should hold a Bachelor of Arts 
(with amajor in Fine Arts) ora Bachelor of Fine Arts. Lbderspe- 
cial circumstances, applicants wittiout a B. A. or B.FA. degree or 
without a mqor in Fine Arts, but wife outstanding artistic orpro- 
fessional qualifications, may be considered for admisaon. 

Admission is based on academic record, two letters of reo- 
otrmendatiai, and a portfolio of at least twenty slides, including 
examples of drawings. A resume of the applicant's background 
should be included in the portfolio. SUde portfolios ^ould be 
salt directly to the Departmait of Art. The department cannot be 
liable for loss or damage or for any transportation or mailing ex- 
pense. 



Asian Studies 91 



Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work 

Additional studio (or art history) courses may be required to 
attain maturity and proficiency and to complete satisfactorily 
the con^jrehensives and thesis. The number and kinds of 
additional courses wiU be stipulated by the admissions 
oannnittee at the time of admission. 

• One public oral examination after completion of each 
semester of ARTS-797 Master's Thesis Seminar and 
tnandatory attendance at all M.FA. in Studio Art public oral 
examinations 

• A thesis exhibition of original works of art in ttie student's 
area of specialization executed independently by the student 
in consultation with aftiesiscommitteeof two orttiree feculty 
members. Written and photographic documentation of 
^jproved thesis is also required. 

• Mandatory attendance at all visiting artist lectures and 
critiques 

Course Requirements 
Areas of Specialization 
Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, or Installation 

• ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum 1(3) 

• ARTS-561 Drawing ftacticum D (3) 

• ARTS-600 Twentieth Century Art Theory (3) 

• ARTS-60 1 CovXaxrpcfcary Art Theory (3) 

• ARTS-797 Master's TTiesis Seminar (3) (1 2 credit hours 

total) 

• 6 (a«dit hours from the following 
graduate art history (ARTH) course 
(X)MM-51 1 History of Documentary (3) 
CX3MM-517 Hi^ory of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 



COMM-520 Hi^ory of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 History of Photography (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following studio courses: 
ARTS-520 Advanced Printmaking (3) 
ARTS-530 Advanced Sculpture (3) 
ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 
ARTS-561 Drawing Practicum II (3) 

• 3 additional credit hours fiom the studio courses above, or 
other graduate course ^qjproved by the department chair 

Area of Specialization 
Multimedia 

• ARTS-600 Twentieth Century Art Theory (3) 

• ARTS-60 1 Contemporary Art Tteory (3) 

• ARTS-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (3) (12 credit hours 

total) 

• 9 credit hours of approved graduate course work 

• 6 credit hoirs from the following 
graduate art history (ARTH) course 
COMM-51 1 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-5 17 History of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 Hi^ry of Photography (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following 
ARTS-560 Drawing Practicum I (3) 
ARTS-561 Drawing Piacticum II (3) 
OOMM-631 Film and Video Production I (3) 
COMM-634 Fihnand Video Production II (3) 
COMM-650 Digital Imaging (3) 
COMM-652 Web Studio (3) 
COMM-654 Motion OtapWcs and Effects I (3) 

other graduate course apfavved by the depertmait diair 



Asian Studies 



Coordinator QuanAeng Zhao, Director, Center for Asian 
Studies and Professor, School of International Service 

The Asian Studies certificate is an interdisciplinary program 
involving courses taught by faculty from across the university. 

Undergraduate Certificate in 

Asian Stndies 

Admission to the Program 

Open to undeigraduate degree and nondegree students. 

Certificate Requirements 

• 15 credit hours of ap>provedcourse work wifti at least 9credit 
hours at the 3004evel or above, with grades of C or better. 
Grades of C- or D in certificatB program courses are not 
accepted toward the fiilfUlment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculationoftfae 



GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 (3PA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs irust take a miniirum of 6 oedit homs 
during each 12-mDnth period and conplete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 12 credit 
hours each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 
credit hours earned at an accredited college or university may 
be applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

• Capstone: successful completion of a 3-credit hour Asian 
studies research project conducted under the supervision of 
an Asian studies faculty member. An independent study or 
Honors Capstone paper may be used to fiilfill this 
requiranent 

• Studeils must conplete at least one year of language courses 
or the equivalent in CJiinese, Hindi, or Jqxmese, or other 
languages with ^jproval of the faculty advisor 



92 College of Arts and Sciences 



Course Requirements 
Gateway Requirement 

• Oneofthe foUowing 
fflST-347 Asian Studies (3) (topics) 

PHIl^B 1 3 Studies in Asian PMosojiiy (3) (topics) 

SIS-161 avili2ations of Asia (3) 

SIS-567 Internatioiial Relations of East Asia (3) 

Concentration 

• 9 credit hours from the following with at least one couise 
from a department other than the one in whidi the student 
has a primary focus: 

ANTH-230/ANrH-230G India Its Uving Traditions 3;2 (3) 
HIST-347 Asian Studies (3) (topics) (if not used for 

Gateway requiiement above) 
PHII^3 1 3 Studies in Asian Philosophy (3) (topics) (if not 

used for Gateway requirement above) 
RELO-185/RELG-185G Forms of flie Sacred; ReUgionsof 

the East 3:1 (3) 
RELG-210/RELG-210G Non-Westem Religious 

Traditions 3:2 (3) 
REIjG-370 Islam (3) 
REIjG-373 Hinduism (3) 
SIS-161 Civilizations of Asia (3) (if not used for Gateway 

requirement above) 
SIS-245/SIS-245G The World of Islam 3:2 (3) 
SIS-255/SIS-255G China, J^an and ttie Ltaited States 3: 2 (3) 
SIS-560 Chinese Foreign Policy (3) 
SIS-561 Modem China (3) 
SIS-562 FbUtical Economy of China (3) 
SIS-563 Japanese Foreign Policy (3) 
SIS-564 Chinese Politics (3) 
SIS-565 U.S. Economic Relations with Jqjan and China 

(3) 
SIS-567 International Relations of East Asia (3) (if not 

used for Gateway requirement above) 

• Capstone (3) 

Graduate Certificate in Asian Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent 
from an accredited institution. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 15 credit hours of approved course woik, with at least 6 
credit hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or 
better. Grades of C - or D in certificate program coinses will 



not be accepted toward the ftilfillment of certificate 
requirements, although fliese grades will be included in the 
calculation of the cumulative grade point average. Students 
must have at least a 3.0 grade point average in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. 
Students in certificate programs must take a miniirum of 6 
credit hours during each 12-nx>nfti period after they are 
admitted. International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester. All programs mist be conpleted within four 
years. A maximnn of 3 credit hours earned at an accredited 
college or university may be appUed toward the certificate as 
transfer credit. 

• Capstone: sucoessfiil completion of a 3 credit-hour Asian 
studies research project conducted under ftie supervision of an 
Asian studies &culty mercber A Substantial Research Pisqier 
(SRP) or graduate iodep>endent study may be used to fulfill this 
requirement. 

• Students must conplete the Graduate Tool of Research 
Language Exam 

Course Requirements 
Gateway Requiremmt 

• One of the following 
HIST-647 Asian Studies (3) (topics) 

PHIL^l 3 Studies in Asian Philosophy (3) (topics) 
SIS-567 International Relations of East Asia (3) 
Concentration 

• 9 credit hours from the following wifli at least one course from 
a department other than the one in which the student has a 
faTmary focus: 

HIST-647 Asian Studies (3) (topics) (if not used forGateway 

requirement above) 
PHIL-61 3 Studies in Asian Philosoj*y (3) (topics) fif not 

used for Gateway requirement above) 
REljG-670Islam(3) 
RELG-673 Hinduism (3) 
SIS-560 Chinese Foreign Pohcy (3) 
SIS-561 Modem China (3) 
SIS-562 ft)litical Econonty of China (3) 
SIS-563 Japanese Foreign Policy (3) 
SIS-564 Chinese Politics (3) 

SIS-565 U.S. Economic Relations with Japan and China (3) 
SIS-567 International Relations of East Asia (3) (if not used 

for Gateway requirement above) 
SIS-676 

• Capstone (3) 



Biology 93 



Biology 



Chair Catherine Schaeff 

FuB-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a W.C. Banta,E.J. Breyere, 

B.J. Claite, RH. Fox, MC. Sager 

Professor DC Culver 

Research Professor D. Boness, B. Chambers, F. Ferari, 

R. Fleischer, J. Harasew>ch, Q Lod), M. Morin, R. Nelson, 

J. Norenhurg, D. Pawson, D. Swanson, K. Swartz 

Associate Professor D.W. Fong, C. Schaeff 

AsastaDt Professor L. Ameson, K. Bushaw-Newton, 

D. Carhni, V. Connau^ton, K. Kim, S. MacAvoy, C. Tudge 

The Department ofBiology provides courses in the Ufe sci- 
ences, emphasizing advances in molecular genetics, erabryol- 
ogy, devdopment, and evolutionary biology. Faculty members 
conduct leseaich in numerous areas including biodiversity, cave 
biology, cell biology, conservation biology, developmental biol- 
ogy, evolutionary ecology, irnnunolQgy, marine science, ma- 
rine mammals, microbiology, molecular genetics, 
oceanography, tropical reefs, and vertebrate visioiL Studaits are 
eiKXHiragied to participate in research prcgects at all levels. Stu- 
dents also have the opportunity to visit, observe, and intern at 
some of the nation's most prestigious biological researdi cen- 
ters, including the National Institutes o f Ffealth (N IH), National 
Institute of Nfental Health (NIMH), Smithsonian Institution, 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic & 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Aquarium in 
Baltimore, and the National Zoo. 

The department has both unda'graduate and graduate teach- 
ing laboratories as \wl! as faculty research laboratories in which 
students are eiKouraged to leam. Students have the opportunity 
to ^in experience with a wide variety of techniques induding 
nucleic acid and protein isolation, DNA analysis and electro- 
phoresis, bacterial and paimary cell culture, stereo, compound, 
and fluorescent microscopy, and computer-assisted measure- 
ments with data analysis. The fecihties of the Etepartment ofBi- 
ology and cooperative agreements with various government 
laboratories make possiWe opportunities for research in envi- 
ronmental, ecological, marine, and biortBdical sciaices. 

The Departmait ofBiology offers programs leading to the 
B.S. in Biology and the M.A. or M.S. in Biology. An 
undergraduate mino r in biology is also available. The depart- 
ment provides basic training ii the life sciences, anphasizing 
modem advaiKcs in the areas of malecular genetics, embryol- 
ogy and development, and evolutionary biology. In addition to 
training for a career or graduate study in biotogy, students are 
prepared for medical, doital, and veterinary schools. The De- 
partment ofBiology offers courses that combine traditional ed- 
ucation with the training necessary for today's professional 
maiketplace. The curriculum is designed to allow individuals 



maximum choice of course selection after departmental re- 
quiremerte have been met. 

The graduate degree programs both enphasize Ae develop- 
ment of research techniques Research and teaching laborato- 
ries are vwll equipped and constantly upgraded. Students have 
the opfwrtunity to gain experience in scientific methods and ex- 
perimental design in the laboratory and in ttie field 

The departmeot also offers a B. A. in Environmental Studies, 
B.S. in Marine Sciaice, minor in environmental sdence, M.S. 
in Environmental Science, and a Graduate Certificate in 
Environmental Assessmoit. See Environmenfed Studies for in- 
formation on admission and program requirements. 

The premedical {Ht>graiie of tiie College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, induding a Bastbaccalaureate Premedical Colificate, are 
available to help aU undergraduate, postbaccalaureate, and 
graduate studaits \Mio are considering a career in medidne or 
one of the aUied health professions. For more information see 
Preprofessional Programs. 

B.S. in Biology 

Admission to the Program 

Admission is flirou^ formal declaration of major The de- 
partment counsels fteshmen and transfer students. 

University Requirements 

• Atotalofl20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of coU^e nsthematics or flie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouises, consisting ofonefoimdationcouree and 
one second4evel course in an approved sequence fitnneadi 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major RequH-emmts 

• 72 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Departmental Requirements 

• BIO-llO/BIO-llOG General Biology I 5: 1(4) 

• BIO-210/BIO-210G General Biology H 5:2 (4) 

• BIO-300Cdl Biology with Laboratory (4) 

• BIO-356 Gwetics witii Laboratory (5) 

• BI0^99 Senior Seminar in Biology (3) 

• 20 credit hours in biology or other courses approved by the 
department chair at the 300 level or above. No more than 3 
credit hours of a combination of BIO -390 Independent 
Reading, BIO-392 Cooperative Education, BIO-490 



94 College of Arts and Sciences 



Independent Study Project in Biology, or BIO-491 
Internship may be counted toward this requirement. 
Related Requirements 

• CHEM-1 10/CHEM-l 1 OG Gereral CJienistry 1 5; 1 (4) 

• CHEM-210/CHEM-21 OG General Chemistry 5 :2 (4) 

• CHEM-310 Organic Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-3 12 Otganic Chemistry I Laboratory (1 ) 

• CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry n (3) 

• CHEM-322 0iganic Chemistry n Laboratory (1) 

• MArH-221 Calculus 1 (4) 

• MAIH-222 Calculus n (4) 
or 

STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• PHYS-nO/PHYS-110GUniversityPhysicsI5:l (4) 
(recommended) 

or 

PHYS-105/PHYS-105G Collie Plysics I 5:1 (4) 

• PHYS-210/PHYS-210G University Phyacs H 5:2 (4) 
(recommended) 

or 

PHYS-205/PHYS-205G College Physics C 5:2 (4) 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have fee oppoi^ 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors woric 
in the depaitment and, upon departmental recomnendation, 
graduate with Univeraty Honors in the major The depart- 
ment's Honors coordinator advises students in the University 
Honors Program regarding depaitmental options. 

Minor in Biology 

• 28 credit hours with grades of C or better and at feast 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• BIO-llO/BIO-llOGGeneralBiology I 5:1 (4) 

• BIO-21 0/B1O-210G General Biology II 5:2 (4) 

• BIO-300 Cell Biology with Laboratory (4) 

• BIO-356 Genetics with Laboratory (5) 

• CHEM-110/CHEM-110GGeneralChemistryI5:l(4) 

• CHEM-210/CHEM-210GGeneral Chemistry 5:2 (4) 

• One additional upper-level Biology course approved by ftie 
department chair 

Combined B.S. and M .A. or M.S. in 
Biology 

Admission to the Program 

Undergraduate biology majors should apply for admission 
to the B.S./Master'sprogramby the endofthe junior year. Ad- 
mission is open to undergraduates whose overall grade point 
average and grade point average in biology cowse is 3.00 or 



higher. Apjiications mist be accompanied by two letteis of 
recommendation, a statement of purpose, and Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) scores. Eadi student's file must be ap- 
proved by the department 's Graduate Studies Cormrittee pricff to 
the endofthe junior year to assure adequate time to conpletede- 
gree requirements for flie program. 

Students should discuss their interest in the program and their 
course schedules with nsmbers of the faculty befijre subnritting 
a fotinal appUcatioa Interested students are encouraged to enroll 
in up to 3 credit hours of BIO-490 Independent Study Project to 
conduct indqjendent study research before applying. 
Requiicm«its 

• All requirements for the B.S. in Biology 
Undergraduate students nray apply 6 credit hours of approved 
5004evelcour8e work in biology, CHEM-560 Biochemistry I, 
and STAT-514 Statistical Methods to satisfy the requirements 
for both degrees. 

• All requirements forthe MA. or M.S. in Biology, including a 
minimum of 24 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. 

M.A. in Biology 

This is a nonthesis degree lor students seeking various life 
sdence professions, as addMonal training for students seeking 
admission to professional schools, or as an intermediate degree 
for ttiosB intending to pursue further graduate study. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, applicants must take the Graduate Record Ex- 
arranation, including the General Test and the Advanced Test in 
Biology. International applicants whose first language is not 
Enghsh are required to submit results of the Test of Enghsh as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants must subnit two letters 
of recommendation. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Corrqirehensive exanination 

• Directed literature research (BIO-790) resulting in a 
significant paper reviewing some aspect of life science; the 
subject ofthis review paper is sdected by flie student subject to 
approval by the graduate studies committee and the diair of the 
department 

• An oral report presented in the form of a pubUc seminar on the 
topic of the review paper 

Course Requironents 

• BIO-566 Evolutionary Mechanisnis (3) 

• BIO-583 Moleailar Biology (3) 

• BIO-677 Special Topics in Developmental Biology (1) 
or 

BIO-679 Topics in Evolutionary Biology (1) 

• BIO-697 Research Mettiods in Biology (3) 



Chemistry 95 



• BIO-790 Biology Literature Research (3) 

• SrAT-514 Statistical Methods (3) (satisfies tool of research 
requirement) 

• An additional 14 hours of approved graduate course work 

M.S. in Biology 

This is a research degree that may serve as an intermediate 
degree for those intending to pursue further graduate study, as 
well as a necessary degree for a variety of careers in the life sci- 
ences. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum universityrequirements 
for graduate study, applicants must take the Graduate Recoid 
Examination, including the General Test and the Advanced Test 
in Biology. International applicants whose Grst language is not 
English are required to submit results of ttie Test ofEnglish as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFIv). Applicants must submit two let- 
ters of recommendation. Preference is given to applicants with a 
clear interest in woridng in the research laboratory of one of the 
full-time faculty membeis in the department. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate work 



• Compiehensive examination 

• Advancement to candidacy, which requiresthe acceptance of 
a research proposal by the studsnt's advisor, the graduate 
studiescommittee, and the diair oft he department at least one 
semester prior to the oral defense of the thesis. 

• CompWtion, oral defense, and the acceptance of ttiesisby the 
thesis committee, chairofthe depfntment, and the university 

Course Requirements 

• BIO-566 Evolutionary Mechanians (3) 

• BIO-583 Molecular Biology (3) 

• BIO-677 Special Topics in Developmental Biology (1) 
or 

BlO-679 Topics in Evolutionary Biology (1) 

• BIO-697 Research Methods in Biology (3) 

• BIO-797 Master's Thesis Research (5) 

• SrAT-514 Statistical Methods (3) (satisfies tool of research 
requirement) 

• An additional 12hoursof appnjved graduate course work 
Special Opportunities 

• Teaching fellow^ps or assistantships 

• Helmlinge and Burfaoe Awards forbiobgy graduate students 



Chemistry 



Chair David Culver 

FuU-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus H.S. El Khadem(IsbeU Chair Emeritus), 

P.F. Waters 

Horace and May IsbeU Char in Natural Products 

Chemistry D. Horton 

Professor AM. Cheh, J.E. Qirard 

Research Professor L.T Hughes, J. Kutina, J.G Osteryoung, 

,C.D. Pibel 

Associate Professor F.W. Carson 

Research Associate Professor A. Le 

Assistant Professor M. KonakUeva,D. Fox 

Chemistry is the science that deals with the cortposition of 
materials, their structures and properties, the transformations 
they imdergo, and the energy changes fliat aoconpany these 
transformations. Areas of study include general, organic, physi- 
cal, analytical, and inorganic diemistry, as well as biochemistry 
and earth science. Students are encouraged to participate in re- 
search pnajects at all levels. 

Accredited by the American Chemical Society, the depart- 
ment oflfers programs leading to the B.S. and MS. inChanistry 
and the B.S. in Biochemistry. Besides training for a career or 
graduate study in diemistry, undergraduate students are pre- 
pared for medical or dental school, engineering progranB, and 
otha- careers where technical expertise is needed. The depart- 



ment provides a po'sonal, congenial environment where stu- 
dents can devdop and pursue a flexible program of study de- 
signed to fulfill individual interests and needs 

The Departmait of Chemistry is equipped with standard 
chemical instrumentation, induding spectrometere and chro- 
matographic equipment. Laboratoiy fadhties in ftie Beeghly 
Building include modem teaching and research laboratories as 
well as a computer room, dark room, controlled temperature 
room, and instrument rooms. Specialized laboratories have 
been est^li^ed for research in biodiemistry, polymer chemis- 
try, and carfeohydratB chemistry, and for work requiring an inert 
atmosphere. Graduate and undergraduate students are involved 
in a variety of research projects using the facilities of the depart- 
ment or through cooperative agreements with many govern- 
mental laboratories. 

Faculty members are involved in conducting research in an- 
alytical diemistry, biochemistry, carbohydrate chenistry, inor- 
ganic chemistry, biotechnology, organic synthesis, and physical 
biochemistry. Laboratory research projects are available in our 
own well-equipped modem building and also at many 
woild-renowned research laboratories in the Washington, D.C. 
area 

Research opportunities in the Washington area through in- 
ternships, cooperative education work-study programs, and 
spedal anangements are available at the following laboratories: 
Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology, Food and 
Drug Administration, National Institute of Standards and Tech- 



96 College of Arts and Sciences 



nology. National Institutes of Health, Naval Medical Reseaicb 
Institute, Naval Reseaidi Laboratory, Naval Surfece Weapons 
Laboratory, U.S. Army Mobility Equipment Research and De- 
velopment Command at Fort Belvoir, and the Walter Reed 
Amiy hstiti<e ofResearch. Students who participate in these 
piDgrams obtain experience with spedalized equipment and 
interact with research scientists outside ttie university. 

The {H«medical programs of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, including a Postbaccalaureate Premedical Certificate, 
are available to help aU undergraduate, postbaccalaureate, and 
graduate students who are considering a career in medicine or 
one of the aDied health professions. For nwre infiinnation see 
Pnsprofessional Programs. 
Teaching Certification 

Students interested in obtaining teaching credentials for 
grades 7-12 may take a 36-credil hour second major in sec- 
ondary education or combine their undergraduate degree with 
the MAT. degree with a concentration in secondary educa- 
tion. For infotmation on admission and program requirements, 
see the School of Education, Teaching and Health secondary 
education programs. 

B.S. in Biochemistry 

Admission to the Pribram 

Fonnal admission to file major requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale). The department counsels fiedi- 
men and transfer studaits, as well as declared biochemistry 
majors. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation couise 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence fixxn 
each of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discpline 

Major Requirements 

• 72 credit hours with grades ofC or better 
Course Requirements 

• BIO-llO/BIO-llOG General Biology I 5:1 (4) 

• BIO-210/BIO-210GGeneral Biology II 5:2 (4) 

• BIO-300 Cell Kology with Laboratory (4) 

• BIO-356 Genetics wifii Laboratory (5) 

• BIO-440 Microbiology with Laboratory (4) 

• BIO-583 Molecular Biology (3) 

• CHEM-1 10/CHEM-l 1 OG General Chemistry 1 5 : 1 (4) 

• CHEM-210/CHEM-210GGeiBral Chemistry n 5:2 (4) 



• CHEM-3 10 Organic Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-312 Organic Chranistry I Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-32D Oiganic Chanistiy H (3) 

• CHEM-322 Oiganic Chemistry n Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-410Biophyacal Chemistry (3) 

• CHEM-411 Biophyacal Chemistry Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-460histruinental Analysis (3) 

• CHEM-461 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (2) 

• CHEM-508 Human Biodiemislry Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-SeO Biochemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-561 Biochemistry n (3) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Cafculus n (4) 

• PHYS-1 lO/PHYS-llOG University Physics I 5: 1 (4) 

• PHYS-210/PHYS-210G IMvCTsity Physics II 5:2 (4) 
University Honors Program 

Students in the Univeraty Honors Program have the opportu- 
nity to graduate with Univasity Honors in the major Students 
may take Honors supplements to satisfy the advanced-level re- 
quirements, but are encouraged to meet with faculty members to 
discuss independent research projects that combine the ad- 
vanced-level and capstone expaienoes. Students register for 
CHEM-398, CHEM-399, CHEM^98, or CHEM^99 as appro- 
priate. The department's Honors coordinator advises students in 
the University Honors Program regarding departmental options. 

B.S. in Chemistry 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the nsijor requires a grade point average 
of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale). The departmmt counsels fi:e^nnBn and 
transfer students, as well as declared chemistry majors. 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit horns 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
exanination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotal often courses, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence fixm eadi of 
the five cuiricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 68 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• CHEM-1 10/CHEM-l lOG Geieral Chemistry 1 5: 1 (4) 

• CHEM-210/CHEM-210GGeiBral Chemistry n 5:2 (4) 

• CHEM-3 10 Oiganic Chemistry I (3) 



Chemistry 97 



• CHEM-3120rganicCheiiiistiyILaboratoiy(l) 

• CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry 11(3) 

• CHEM-3220rgaiicCTieinistiyII Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-350Quanlitative Analysis (3) 

• CHEM-351 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (2) 

• CHEM-410 Biophysical Chemistry (3) 

• CHEM-4 11 Biophysical Chemistry L<4)oratory(l) 

• CHEM^60 Instrumental Analysis (3) 

• CHEM-461 Instnmiental Analysis Laboiatoiy (2) 

• CHEM-5 1 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3 ) 

• CHEM-5 llAdvaiced Physical Chemistry LaboTEtoryP) 

• CHEM-550 Advanced Inorganic Chenistry (3) 

• CHEM-5 52 Inorganic Chenistry Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-560 BiocfaemBtry I (3) 

• CHEM-561 Biochemistry H (3) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus n (4) 

• MATH-3 1 3 Calculus m (4) 

• fflYS-1 10/PHYS-l lOG University Physics I 5: 1 (4) 

• FHYS-210/PHYS-210G University Physics n 5:2 (4) 

• At least 3 credit hours from the following: 
CHEM-490 hidependent Study Project (1-6) 
CHEM-498 Honors: Senior Year(l-3) 
CHEM^99HonOTs: Senior Year (1-3) 

Special Opportunities 

• Anthony M Schwartz Undergraduate Research Fellowship 

• Qualified junior and senior chemistry majors nay conduct 
r«seaidi under CHEM-3 90/490 Independent Study Project 

• A cooperative work-study program involving several 
research organizations is available through fee Department of 
Chemistry. Undergraduate students work full time for six 
trmi^ and study at the university for five monttis. 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with Utriveraty Honors in the major. Students 
may take Honors si^jplements to satisfy the advanced-level re- 
qutiemerls, but are encouraged to meet with faculty members 
to discuss independent research projects that combine ttie ad- 
vanced-level and capstone experiences. Students register for 
CHEM-398, CHEM-399, CHEM^98, or CHEM^99 as ap- 
propriate. The department's Honors coordinator advises stu- 
dents in the Univeraty Honors Program regarding departmental 
options. 

Minor in Biochemistry 

• 35 credit hours with gradesofCorbetterandat least 12crBdit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• BIO-1 10/BIO-l lOG General Biology 1 5: 1 (4) 



• BIO-210/BIO-210O General Biology II 5:2 (4) 

• BIO-300 Cell Biology with laboratory (4) 

• CHEM-1 1 (VCHEM-l lOG General Chemistiy 1 5: 1 (4) 

• CHEM-21»'CHEM-210G General Chemistry 115:2 (4) 

• CHEM-310Organic Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-3 1 2 Organic Chemistry 1 laboratory ( 1 ) 

• CHEM-320 Organic ChemistTyn (3) 

• CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry n Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-508 Human Biochanistry Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-560 Biochemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-561 Biochemistry n (3) 

Minor in Chemistry 

• 24credithourswTth gradesofCorbetterandatleast 12ctedit 
hours uniqiK to ftie minor 

Course Requirements 

• CHEM-1 1 C/CHEM-1 lOG General Chemistry I 5: 1 (4) 

• CHEM-21G/CHEM-210G General Ctemistry 5:2(4) 

• CHEM-310Organic Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-3 1 2 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (1 ) 

• CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry 11(3) 

• CHEM-3220rganic Chemistry n Laboratory (1) 

• 8 credit hours from the following with the approval of the 
department chair 

CHEM-350 Quantitative Analysis (3) 
CHEM-351 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (2) 
CHEM-4 10 Biophysical Ctemishy (3) 
CHEM-4 1 1 Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory (1) 
CHEM-460 Instnimerial Analysis (3) 
CHEM-461 Insbumental Analysis Laboratory (2) 
CHEM-510 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-5 1 1 Advanced Physical Qiernistry Laboi^ory (2) 
CHEM-560 Biochemistry I (3) 
CHEM-561 Biochemistry H (3) 

Combined B.S. and M.S. in Chemistry 

Admission to the Program 

Undergraduate chemistry majors diould apply for admis- 
sion to the B.S./M.S. program by the end of the junior year. Ad- 
mission is open to undegraduates whose overall grade poirt 
average and grade point average in chemistry courses is 3.00 or 
higher. Applications must be accompanied by two lettersof rec- 
ommendation and a statement of purpose. 

Students should discuss their interest in the program with 
men4)ers of the faculty before submitting a fcimal application 
Interested students are encouraged to enroll in CHEM-490 In- 
dependent Study Project to conduct independait study research 
before applying. 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Requiremeots 

• All requirements forlhe B.S. in Chemistry or Biodieraistry 
Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours of 
^proved 500-level course work in chemistry or 3 credit 
houis in chemistry and STAT-514 Statistical Methods to 
satisfy the requiremmts for botti degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Chemistry, including a 
minimum of 24 credit hours conpleted in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awaided. 

M.S. in Chemistry 

Admission to the Program 

AppUcants mist have eamed a degree equivalent to fulfill- 
ing the requirements for a B.S. in Chemistry or Biochemistry 
with a 3.00 cumulative grade point average (on a 4.00 scale) in 
chemistry from a college accredited by the American Chemi- 
cal Society or equivalent. Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) scores are required. AU apphcations must be approved 
by the faculty of ttie Department of Chemistry. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 oedit hours of approved graduate woik 

The entire course of studymustconstituteaunified pro gram. 
Each student oust have a proposed cuniculum approved by 
the depiartment's academic advisor and the department chair 
within one semester after entering the program 

• Tool of research: an examination in German, French, 
Russian, oonputer progranming, or statistics. 

• One comprehensive examination 

• Research requirement: 

CHEM-797 Master's Thesis Reseaidi (6) or 



CHEM-797 Master's Thesis Research (3) and 
CHEM-691 Internship in Chemistry (3) 
with grades of B or better 

A thesis of pubhshable quality based on original chemical 
laboratory research must be presented at a public seminar and 
defended before the students's committee immediately 
thereafter A research proposal rraist be accepted by the 
student's thesis committee at least one semester prior to the 
oral defense of the thesis. 
Course Requirements 

• CHEM-602 Research Method Desigp (3) 

• CHEM-603 Ctemical Characterization (3) 

• CHEM-604 Advanced Laboratory Techniques (3) 

• CHEM-605ReseardiSeninar(3) 

• CHEM-797 Master Is Thesis Research (6) 
or 

CHEM-797 Master ^ Thesis Research (3) and 
CHEM-691 Internship in Chemistry (3) 

• Three courses from the following: 
CHEM-510 Advanced Physical Chemistiy (3) 
CHEM-520 Advanced Oiganic Chemistiy I (3) 
CHEM-540 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-550 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-561 Biochemistry H (3) 

• One course from the following 
CHEM-521 Advanced Organic Chemistiy n (3) 
CHEM-535 Topics in Biological and Orgpnic 

Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-555 Topics in Inorganic and Analytical 

Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-565 Proteomics (3) 



Computer Science, Audio Technology, and Physics 



Chair Teresa L Laikin 

FuU-Tbne Facutty 

Computer Science 

Professor Emeritus R A. Bassler, T.J. Bergin, 

F.W. Connolly, W.J. Kennevan, ID. Welt 

Professor M. Owrang, A. Wu 

Associate Professor Emeritus WH. Gammon 

Associate FHifessor M.A. Gray 

Instructor A. Ford, R. Myers 

Physics 

Professor Emeritus M Harrison, R.B. Kay, H.R. Reiss, 

RA. Segnan, R.V. Wateihouse, J A. White 

Professor R. Berendzen, L Medsker 

Associate nvfessor T. Laridn 

Assistant Professor N. Harstoian 

Audio Technology 

Assistant Professor P. Oehlras 



The Department of Computer Science, Audio Technology, 
and Physics provides programs in three disciplines that stand at 
the forefront of most scientific and technical areas. Students in 
these programs leam the fundamentals of a discipline wMle pre- 
paring themselves for careeis in the sciences or technologies. In 
addition, the department is able to provide innovative 
cross-discipline courses so ttiat students can gain a broader edu- 
cation. 

The department's Washington, D.C. location affords students 
access to many governmental, cultural, scientific, and historical 
institutions. These institutions serve as an inportant research re- 
source and as a source of employment for students with the 
strong technological background provided by these pnograms. 

Audio Technology 

The B.S. in Audb Tedmology, flie B.A. in Audio Produc- 
tion, and a ninor in audio technology are ofiFered. The B.S. in 
Audio Technology pirepiares students for careers in the audio, en- 
totainment, acoustics, computer, and electronics fields, while 



Conputa- Science, Audio Tedmology, and Physics 99 



the B. A. in Audio Production concentrates on audio and music 
production wittiin the broader context of a Uberal arte educatioa 
These prograrrB focus on the art and science of audb and music 
technology, including sound synthesis and electronic music 
production, multitrack studio recording, analog and digital elec- 
tronics, physic&'acoustics, and digital audio workstations. Stu- 
dents can gain real-wt)rld experience by interning at a 
professional recording studio, radio or television station, the- 
ater, or ottier such fecility. 
CoitqMter Science 

The B.S., M.S., and undograduate minor in Computer Sci- 
ence are offered. These programs prepare students for a wide 
range of career opportunities in software devetopment and de- 
sign, multimedia computing, artificial intelligence and com- 
puter visbn, and other technical computing professions. They 
ensure a balanced presentation of flie practical and theoretical 
aspects of computer scietx^e and provide students with a back- 
ground for professional anploymait or fiirtbsr graduate study 
in the discipline. 
Physics 

The B.S. in Physics, a minor in physics, and a ninorand un- 
dergraduate certificate in applied fiiysics are ofifered. Courses 
focus on the study of physical phenomena and properties o f the 
universe: gravitation, electricity and magnetism, atcroic and nu- 
clear structure, fundamental particles, and the properties of mat- 
ter. 

In our high-tedmobgy society, people with undergradiBte 
physics backgrounds are emyioyed in research labs and engi- 
neering fields, work in consulting companies, or pursue gradu- 
ate studies. Physics graduates are in diverse fidds such as 
conputer systems analysis and design, fiber-optics telecommu- 
nications systems, medical physics, acoustics, environmental 
science, digital audio and multimedia technolc^y, science edu- 
catioD, and science policy. Educational facilities incLide general 
laboratories, as well as laboratories in physics education, 
MossbaiKr spectroscopy, laser phyacs, oomputatiocial physics, 
and neund computing. 

B.A. in Audio Production 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the program reqxrires a grade point av- 
erage of 200 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental approval. 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hoirs of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloften courses, consisting ofonefoundationcouise and 
one second4evel course in an approved se<pience fiwmeach 
of five cuiricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 



Major Requirements 

• 56 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Core Courses (23 credit hours) 

• APEC-lOl Fundamentals of Audio Techn(dogy (3) 

• ATEC-l 02 Audio Tedmology I .aboriory (1 ) 

• ArEC-210SoundSyrthesisI(3) 

• ArEC-220 Sound Synthesis 11(3) 

• ArEC-410 Sound Studio Techniques and ftactioe (3) 

• ArEC^20 Advmced Sound Studio Techniques (3) 

• ArEC-450 Audio Tedmology Capstcme (1 -6) 

• ArEC-507 Digital Audio >M)rkstations I (3) 

• ArEC-508 Digital Audio ^^brkslatio^s II (3) 

Arts Courses (12 credit hours) 

• Two sequences (4 coiises total) fiomthe fdlowing: 
MMDD-200 Multimedia I (3) and 

MMDD400 Multimedia U (3) 
reRF-102 Modan Daice \{3)and FERF-202 Modem 

Dance H (3) 
reRF-1 1 5/PERF-l 1 5G Theatre: Prindples, Plays, 

and Pafomance 1: 1 (3) ami PERF-20(VPERF-200G 

Dance and Society 1 :2 (3) 
PERF-124 Hanrony I (3) and PERF-125 Harmony D (3) 
reRF-227 MusidansMp I (3) and 

FERF-228 Musidanship D (3) 
FERF-260 Princples of Production I (4) and 

FERF-261 Principles of Production E (4) 
reRF-305 History and Phitosophy ofDanoe I (3) and 

FERF-306 History and Phitosophy ofDanoe U. (3) 
reRF-322 Music History 1(2)md 

PERF-323 Music History II (3) 
PERF-365 Theatre History I (3) and 

FERF-366 Theatre History H (3) 

Business and Communication Courses 
(12 credit hours) 

• Two sequeiKes (4 courses total) fix>mtfae fdlowing 
ACCT-201 Legal Issues in Business (3) and 

ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 
CXDMM- 1 0(yCOMM-l OOG Understanding Mass Media 4: 1 

{7) and 

COMM-200 Writing fijr Mass Conmunication (3) 
COMM-105/COMM-105G Visual Literacy 1 :1 (3) and 

COMM-200 Writing for Mass Commmic^on (3) 
COMM-33 1 Fihnand Video Production 1 (3) and 

COMM-333 Fundamaitals of TV and VTR (3) 
BCON-100/ECON-100GMacroeconOTnics4:l (3) and 

BCON-200/ECON-200G IvEcroeconamics4:2 (3) 
FIN-200/FIN-200G P&sonal Finance and Financial 

Institutions 4:2 (3) and 

IBUS-200/IBUS-200GTheGIobEi Maricetpbce 3:2 (3) 



100 College of Alts and Sciences 



Efectives (9 credit hours) 

• 9 credit hours from ttie following: 

ARTH-IOS/AKTH-IOSO Art: The Historical 

Experience 1 : 1 (3) 
ARTH-210/AKrH-210G Modem Art: Nineteoith and 

Twraitiefli Centuries 1:2 (3) 
ArBC-305 Acoustics (3) 
ArBC-390 Indqwndent Reading (1-^ 
ArBC-491 Intanshp (1-6) 
COMM-331 Film and Video Pioduction I (3) 
COMM-333 Fundamentals ofTV and VTR (3) 
CSC-100 Conputers and Infomaation (3) 
CSC-210 Creativity and Computers (3) 
MMDD-200 Nfultimedia I (3) 
MMDD-400 Multimedia 11 (3) 
MMDD^SO Multimedia m (3) 
PSYC-105/PSYC-105GPsyclBlogy Understanding 

Human Behavior 4: 1 (3) 
PSYC-1 15/PSYC-l 15G PSyctology as a Natural 

Science 5:1 (4) 
PSYC-235/PSYC-235G Theories ofPersonality 4:2 (3) 
PS YC-240/PSYC-240G Dmgs and Behavior 5: 2 (3) 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors work 
in the department and, upon departmental recortmendation, 
graduate with University Honors in ttie major The depart- 
ment's Honors coordinator advises students in the University 
Hawrs Program regarding departmental options. 

B.S. in Audio Technology 

Admission to ttie Program 

Formal admission to the program requires a grade point av- 
erage of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and the approval of the depart- 
ment undergraduate advisor 

University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit houis 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence from 
each of five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discpline 

Major Requirements 

• 54 credit hours with grades of C or better 



Course Requironents 

Core Courses (36 credit hours minimum) 

• ATEC-lOl Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) 

• ATBC-1 02 Audio Technology Laboratory (1) 

• ATBC-210 Sound Synthesis 1 (3) 

• ArEC-220 Sound Synthesis n (3) 

• ArEC-305 Acoustics (3) 

• ArEC-410 Sound Studio Techniques andPractice (3) 

• ArEC-420 Advanced Sound Studio Techniques (3) 

• ArEC-450 Audio Technology Capstone (1-6) 

• ArEC-507 Digital Audio Woikstations I (3) 

• ArEC-508 Digital Audio Woikstations IT (3) 

• MATH-211 Applied Calculus 1(4) 

or 
MATH-221 Cakulus I (4) 

• One of the following 
COMM-IOO/COMM-IOOG Uolerstanding 

Mass Media 4:1 (3) 
COMM-105/COMM-105G Visual Literacy 1 :1 (3) 
COMM-333 Fundamentals of TV and VTR (3) 

• One of the following 
PERF-120 Music Fundamentals (3) 
PERF-260 Principles of Production I (4) 
PERF-362 Lighting Design (3) 

Physics Courses (6 credit hours minimum) 

• A two-course sequence fiom the following: 
PHYS-IOO/PHYS-IOOG Physics for the Modem 

Worid5:l(4)ant/ 
PHYS-200/PHYS-200G Physics for the New 

Millennium 5:2 (3) 
or 

PHYS-105/PHYS-105G College Physics 1 5: 1 (4) and 
PHYS-205/PHYS-205G CoU^e Pltysics H 5:2 (4) 
or 

PHYS-1 10/PHYS-llOG IMvasity Phyacs I 5:1 (4) and 
PHYS-210/PHYS-210G Uiiversity Physics U 5:2 (4) 

Electronics and Computer Science Courses 
(12 credit hours minimum) 

• Two sequences from the following: 

ATEC-3 1 2 Electronics 1 (3yArEC-322 Electronics Lab I (2) 

and 

ArEC-31 3 Electronics H (3yArBC-323 Electronics Lab H (2) 

AFEC-SOO Miooelectronics (4) and 

ATBC-SOl Digital ElectiOTics (4) 
CSC-1 00 Computers and bforriBtion (3) and 

CSC-210 Creativity and Computers (3) 
CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) and 

CSC-281 Introduction to Computer Science II (3) 
CSC-282 Ass«r4)lyianguage Programming Q) and 

CSC-330 Organization of Cortputer Systems (4) 



Computa- Science, Audio Technology, and Physics 101 



CSC-543 Object-Orierted Analysis and Design (3) and 
CSC -544 Object-Oriented Piogrammiig (3) 
University Honors Program 

Students in the UniNcrsity Honors Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with Univasity Honors in the major. To do 
so, students complete 1 2 hours of advanoed-level Pfcmors woik 
in the department and, upon departmental recoirmendation, 
graduate with Lhiversity Honors in ttie rrajor The department's 
Honors coordinator advises students in tiie University Hbnois 
Program regarding departmental options. 

B.S. in Computer Science 

Admission to the Program 

FomBl admisacm to the majcr requires a amulatiw grade 
point average of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmenld approval 

University Requiremoits 

• Atotal of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hoirs of coUege writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or flie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencomses, consisting ofonefoundationcouise and 
one second4evel course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No mare than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requrements 

• 69 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• CSC -280 hSroduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• CSC -281 htroduction to Computer Science n (3) 

• CSC -330 Oganization of Computer Systems (4) 

• CSC-350hitroduction to Discrete Structures (3) 

• CSC-520Algoriftmis and Data Structures (4) 

• CSC -521 Design and C^-garrization ofProgramming 

Languages (4) 

• CSC-565 Operating Systems (3) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus n (4) 

• MATH-3 10 Linear Algebra (3) 

• SrAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• 15 credit hours ^jprowed by the stiKteit's advisor from the 
following; no more than 6 credit hours of cooperative 



education, internship, independent study, or independent 

reading may be used to fulfill this requirement. 

CSC -282 Assertfcly-Language Programming (3) 

CSC -310 Intoduction to Geografiiic In£>rmation ^steriB (3) 

CSC-390 lMiep«ident Reading in Computer Sciaice (1-6) 

with departmental approval 
CSC -392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) 
CSC-396 Selected Topics (3) withdepartmei4al approval 
CSC -432 Introduction to Simulation and Modeling (3) 
CSC ^35 \\feb Piogramming (3) 
CSC ^38 PL;SQL Database Programming (3) 
CSC -442 Client-Seiver and DistnTiuted Information 

Systems (3) 
CSC ^91 Internship (1-6) 
CSC -5 10 Legal Issues in Computing (3) 
CSC -535 User Interface Analysis and Design (3) 
CSC-543 Object-Orierted Anal>Bis and Design (3) 
CSC -544 Object-Orierted Programming (3) 
CSC -546 Introduction to Computer Netwodcs (3) 
CSC -568 Artificial Litelligaice (3) 
CSC -570 Database Management Systems (3) 
CSC -589 Topics in Computer Sdence (3) 
CSC-596 S^cted Topics (3) with depatmertal approval 
MATH-5 60 Numerical Analysis: Basic Problems (3) 

• Atwo-semester sequajce of labotatoiy science: 
BIO-llO/BIO-llOG General Biology I 5:1 (4) and 
BIO-210/BIO-210G General Bidogy D 5:2 (4) 
or 

CHEM-1 lOkCHEM-1 lOG General Chemistry 1 5: 1 (4) and 

CHEM-21(yCHEM-210GGeneial Ctemistry n5:2 (4) 

or 

mYS-105/PHYS-105G College Phyacs 15:1 (4) and 

FHYS-205/PHYS-205G CoUege Phyacs n 5:2 (4) 

or 

mVS-l 1 0/FHYS-l lOO Univeisity Riysics ISA (4) and 

PHYS-210/PHYS-210O University Physics n 5:2 (4) 

• Two additional science courses, and/or courses with strong 
enpbasis on quantitative methods 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have the oppor- 
tunity to gradiBte with University Honors in the najor To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level tfonois woik 
in the department and, \xpoa departmental recommendation, 
graduate with Lhiversity Honors in the najor The department's 
Honors coordaiator advises students in tiie Univeisity Honors 
Program regarding defiartmertal options. 



102 College of Arts and Sciences 



B.S. in Physics 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental approval 
University Reqinrements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation couise 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence from 
each of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discqjUne 

Tracks 

Chemical Ftysics, Computational Physics, or Traditional 

Physics 

Major Requirements 

• 57 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Core (45 credit hours) 

• CSC-280 hitroduction to Coinpiter Science I (4) 

• MArH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• MAIH-222 Calculus n (4) 

• MArH-313Cakulusni(4) 

• MATH-321 Differential Equations (3) 

• PHYS-1 10/PHYS-l lOO Lhiva^ty Physics 1 5: 1 (4) 

• PHYS-210/PHYS-210G University Phyacs n 5:2 (4) 
(PHYS-110andPHYS-210may be waived for students with 
exceptional high school preparation) 

• PHYS-330 Classical Mechanics (3) 

• PHYS-350 Electricity and Magnetian (3) 

• PHYS-365 Waves and Optics (3) 

• Pirre-370 Modem Physics (3) 

• PHYS-440 Experimental Physics (3) 

• PHYS-470 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3) 

Tracks (12 credit Hours) 
Chemical Physics 

Prerequisite: CHEM-210/CHEM-210G General 
Chemistry U 5:2 (4) 

• 12 credit hours from the following: 
CHEM-310 Organic Chranistry I (3) 
CHEM-3 12 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (1) 
CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry H (3) 
CHEM-322 Oiganic Chemistiy n Laboratory (1) 
CHEM-350 Quantitative Analysis (3) 
CHEM-351 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory (2) 



CHEM-410 BioiAysical Chemistry (3) 
CHEM-411 Bicphysical Chenristry Laboratory (1) 
CHEM^eO tostrmnental Analysis (3) 
CHEM-461 Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (2) 
Computational Physics 

• 12 oedit hours from the following: 

CSC-28 1 hitroduction to Computer Science 11 (3) 
CSC-330 Organization of Conputer Systems (4) 
CSC-432 Introduction to Simulation and Modeling (3) 
CSC-520 Algoriflims and Data Structures (4) 
CSC-543 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (3) 
Traditional Physics 

• 12 credit hours from the foUowing: 
ArEC-305 Acoustics (3) 
ATEC-312 Electronics 1 (3) 
ArEC-313 Electronics U (3) 
ArEC-322 Electronics Lab I (2) 
ArEC-323 Electronics Lab H (2) 
MATH-3 10 LiiBar Algebra (3) 
PHYS-220/PHYS-220G Astronomy 5:2 (3) 
PHYS-230/PHYS-230G Changing Views of tte 

Uni\«rse 5:2 (3) 
University Honors Program 

Students in tiie University Honors Programhave ttie opportu- 
nity to graduate with Lfaiversity Honors in the major. To fulfill 
requirements for Univeisity Honors in Physics, students may 
take Honors suppJements to satisfy the advanced-level reqinre- 
ments, but are especially encouraged to meet with membeis of 
the Physics feculty to discuss independent research projects that 
could conprise both ttie advanced-level and c^)stone experi- 
ences. The department's Honors coordinator advises students in 
the University Honors Program regarding dqjartmental options. 

Minor in Audio Technology 

• 22 credit hours with grades ofC or better and at least 12 credit 
houis unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ATEC-l 01 Fundamentals of Audio Technology (3) 

• ATBC- 1 02 Audio Techndogy Laboratory ( 1 ) 

• ArBC-210 Sound Synthesis I (3) 

• ArEC-220 Sound Synthesis n (3) 

• ArEC-410 Sound Studio Techniques and Practice (3) 

• ArEC^20 Advanced Sound Studio Techniques (3) 

• ATBC-SO? Digital Audio Workstations I (3) 

• ArEC-508 Digital Audio Workstations n (3) 
or 
COMM-333 Fundairentals of TV and VIK (3) 



Computer Science, Audio Technology, and Flysics 103 



Minor in Computer Science 

• 20 credit hours \^ith grades of C a- better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to ttie minor 

Course Requirements 

• C?SC-100 Computers and Information (3) 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Sdence I (4) 

• CSC -281 Introduction to Computer Sdence II (3) 

• CSC-520Algoriftims and Data Structures (4) 

• Two courses from the following: 

CSC -330 Organization of Computer Systems (4) 
CSC -432 Introduction to Simulation and Nfodehng (3) 
CSC -442 Client-Server andDistnbuted Infixmation 

Systems (3) 
CSC-565 Operating Systems (3) 
CSC -570 Database Management Systems (3) 
or other courses with advisor's approval 

Minor in Applied Physics 

• IScredit hours with giadesofCor better with at least 12 
oedit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• PHYS-1 00/PHYS-l GOO Physics for flie Modem 

\\brld5:l(4) 
or 

fflYS-105/PHYS-105G CoUege Physics 1 5: 1 (4) 
or 
PHYS-110/PHYS-110GlMversityPhysicsI5:l (4) 

• rHYS-200/PHYS-200GHiysicsforflieNew 

Millennium 5; 2 (3) 
or 

mYS-205/PHYS-205G Cdle^ Physics n 5 :2 (4) 
or 
IHYS-210/PHYS-210G Univeraty Physics II 5:2 (4) 

• FHYS-220/PHYS-220G Astronomy 5:2 (3) 
or 

PHYS-230/PHYS-230G Changing Views of the 
Ltoiveise 5:2 (3) 

• mYS-370 Modem Physics (3) 

• 6 credit hours in elective courses at ttie 300 level or above , 
including courses outside of physics in relevant areas of 
technology, society, and policy, as approved by the 
department. 



Minor in Physics 



• 24credit hours with grades ofC or better with at least 12 
oedit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) onrf 
MArH-222 Calculus K (4) 



MATH-2 1 1 AppHed Calculus \(A)and 
MATH-212 Applied Calculus H (3) 

• PHYS-105/PHYS-105G College Physics 1 5:1 (4) 
or 

PHYS-1 10/FHYS-llOG University Physics I 5:1 (4) 

• FHYS-205/PHYS-205O CoUege Phyacs H 5 :2 (4) 
or 

FHYS-210/PHYS-210G Universty Physics U 5:2 (4) 

• FHYS-370 Modem Physics (3) 

• fflYS-330 Classical Mechanics (3) 

• PHYS-350 Electricity and Magnetism(3) 

Undergraduate Certificate in 

Applied Physics 

Admission to the Program 

Open to undergraduate degree and nondegree students. 
Credits earned for the certificate may be applied toward an un- 
dei^graduate d^ree program. 

Certificate Requirements 

• 18 credit hours of approved course woik witti at least 9 credit 
hours at flie 3004evel or above, with g^des of C or better. 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the ftdfilknent of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in the calculationof the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 (ffA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs rtust take a mininum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-mDnth period and corrplete the certificate in 
four years. International students must eixoll in 12 credit 
hours each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 
aedit hours earned at an accredited college or university may 
be applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• FHYS-100/PHrV^-100GI%sics for the Modem 

World 5:1 (4) a«/ 
PHYS-200/PHYS-200G Physics for flie New 

Millennium 5:2 (3) 
or 

PHYS-105/PHYS-105G CoUege Physics 1 5: 1 (4) am/ 
FHYS-205/PHYS-205G CoUege Physics H 5 :2 (4) 
or 

FHYS-llO/mVS-llOG University Physicsl 5:1 {A)and 
IWYS-210/PHYS-210G University Physics H 5:2 (4) 

• FHYS-370 Modan Physics (3) 

• 9 credit hours in elective courses, at least two of which must 
be at the 300 level or above, including courses outside of 
physics in relevant areas oftechnology, society, and policy, as 
^)prov«d by the department. 



104 CoDegeof ArtsandScioices 

Combined B.S. and M.S. in 
Computer Science 



Admission to the Program 

Admission is open to undergraduate ccsnputer science ma- 
jors wife a minimim grade point average of 3.20. Applicants 
mist have oompbted tbe following by the end of fee junior 
year. 

CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I 

CSC-28 1 Introductian to Computer Science n 

CSC-520 Algorifems and Data Structures 
Requirements 

• All requirements for fee B.S. in Conputer Science 
Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours of 
approved 500-level course woik to satisfy fee lequiiements 
of bofe degrees 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Computer Science, 
including a minimum of 24 credit hours oompteted in 
residence in graduate status after tbe undergraduate degree 
has been awarded. 

Combined B.S. in Mathematics and 
M.S. in Computer Science 

Admission to the Program 

Admission is open to undergraduate tnafeematics mqors 
wife a rdninum grade point average of 3.20. AppHcants must 
have completed the foDowing by the axl of fee junior year. 

CSC-280 Introductian to Computer Science I 

CSC-28 1 Introduction to Computer Science II 

CSC-520 Algorifems and Data Structures 
Requiremoits 

• AH requirements forfee B.S. inMafeematics 
Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours of 
approved 500-level course woik to satisfy fee lequiremeris 
of bofe degrees 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Computer Science, 
iacludiag a rmnimum of 24 credit hours completed in 
residence in graduate status after the undergraduate degree 
has been awarded. 

Students may appJy 6 credit hours of approved course work at 
the 500 level to satisfy fee requirements of both degrees. 

Combined B.S. in Physics and 
M.S. in Computer Science 

Knowledge of pihysics and conqiuting techniques can en- 
hance careers in a variety of fields. Computing is an integral 
part of physicists' woik, and a knowledge of physics gives 
computing professionals an advantage in today's technology 
and apf^cations aivironmeot. A full-tiine student can com- 
plete this program and receive a B.S. in Physics and a M.S. in 
Computer Science in five years. 



Admission to the Program 

Admission is open to undergraduate physics mqors wife a 
minimum grade point average of 3.00. AppHcatioos mist be ac- 
companied by two letto^ of reconmendation and a statement of 
purpose. 
Requirements 

• All requirements forfee B.S. in Physics 

• Undragraduate students may apply 6 credit hours of approved 
500-level course work to satisfy fee requirements of bofe 
degrees. 

• All lequiremenls for the MS. in ConputCT Science, including 
a minimum of 24 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awanled. 



M.S. in Computer Science 



Admission to tbe Program 

In addition to meeting fee minimum univeraty requirements 
for graduate study, applicants must have adequate undergraduate 
preparation or experience in computer science. Students entaing 
the program without fee appropriate background will be ex- 
pected to take certain undergraduate courses as a prerequisite. 
Applicants mist submit scores from fee Graduate Record Exam- 
ination (GRE) aptitude test. 
Degree Requirements 

• 35 cs«dit hours of approved graduate woik 

CSC-520, CSC-521 , CSC-540, and aU course woik for tool of 
research, comprehensive, and thesis ornonfeesis requirements 
must be passed with grades ofTS or better 

• Tool of research; satisfied by completion of CSC -600 
Simulation wife a grade of B or better 

• Comprehensive examination: satisfied by oomjdetion of 
CSC-694 C^stone Project wife a giade of B or better 

• 6 credit hours of feesis ornonfeesis option 

Thesis option; CSC -797 Master's Thesis Seminar in 
Computer Science wife grades of B or better and an oral 
defense of fee feesis 

Nonfeesis option; 6 credit hours with grades ofB or better from 
fee following: 

CSC-636 Advanced Database Management 
CSC-637 Database Admiustration 
CSC-689 Topics in Con^xiter Science 
CSC-690 Independent Study in Computa" Science 
Course Requironents 

• CSC-520 Algorithms and Data Stmdures (4) (or equivaloit) 

• CSC-521 Design and Orgpniz^on of Programming 

Languages (4) (or equivalent) 

• CSC-540 Coinputer System Oigani2ation and 

Programning (3) (or equivaleii) 

• CSC-600 Simulation (3) 

• CSC-694 Capstone Reject (3) 



Computo- Science, Audio Technology, end Physics 1 05 



• 12 credit hours fium the following with at least two coiffsesal 
the 600-level; no more than 6 credit houn; ofcooperatiw 
education, internship, independent study, or independent 
reading may be used to fulfill this requirement; 
CSC -510 Ijegal Issues in Computing (3) 
CSC -535 User Interface Analysis and Design (3) 
CSC -543 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (3) 
CSC-544 Object-Oriented Programming (3) 
CSC -546 Introduction to Computer Netwoiks (3) 
CSC -565 Operating Systems (3) 
CSC -568 Artificial hitelUgesice (3) 
CSC -570 Database Management Systems (3) 
CSC -589 Topics in Coit^uter Science (3) 
CSC-596 Selected Topics (with departmental approval) 
CSC -610 hilroduction to Geografiiic Infcnnation Systems (3) 
CSC -636 Advanced Database Management (3) (if not used 

to fulfill nonthesis option requirement) 
CSC -637 Database Administration (3) (if not used to fiUfill 

nonthesis option requirement) 
CSC -689 Topics in Cranputer Science (3) 
CSC -691 hiemship (1-6) 

CSC -692 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3-6) 
CSC -696 Selected ToiBcs(with depaitaKntal apjioval) 
Thesis option: 

• CSC-797 Master's ThesisSeminarinComputerScience (6) 

Nonthesis option: 

• 6credithourswithgradesofBorbetterfromthe following; 
CSC -636 Advanced Ebtabase Management (3) 

CSC -637 Database Administration (3) 

CSC -689 Topics in CompHtBT Sdence (3) 

CSC-690 hsiependent Study in Computer Science (1-6) 

Graduate Certificate in 

Computer Science 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree fixjm an accred- 
ited institution and a course in calcuhis. 

Requirements 

• 17 credit hours of appiDvedcourse weak wifli at least 6credit 
hours at the 600^evel or above, with grades of B or better 
Grades of C or D in certificate program courees are not 
accepted toward the fiilGUment of certificate roquiranents, 
althou^ these grades will be included in the calculation o f the 
GPA. Students mist have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimun of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-mDnth period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9 credit hows 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
e^jplied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 



Course Requirements 

• CSC-520Algoriaims and Data Structures (4) (or 
equivalent) 

• CSC -521 Design and Organization ofProgramming 

Languages (4) 

• CSC -540 Computer System Organization and 

ftogramming (3) 

• CSC -600 Simulation (3) 

• 3 credits finm the following 

CSC -689 Topics in Computer Science (3) 
CSC -696 Selected Topics (3) 



M.S. in Applied Science 



Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, applicants must have taken undergraduate 
science courses appropriate to the concentration, or have signif- 
icant practical background in a relevant science area. A 
cuniilativc undergraduate grade point average of 3.00 (on a 
4.00 scale) is required. Specific courses needed to prepare for 
entering the program wiH be identified throu^ interviews witti 
the apphcant. 
Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Tool of research; analytical courses (see Course 
Requirements, below) 

• One written comprehensive exanination 

• Non thesis course work 6 credit hours in 600-level courses as 
approved by a faculty advisor, with grades of B or better 

• Students participate in nonCTeditwoikshoiK and seminars on 
professional skills and current issues in science and 
technology. Students are required to demonstrate proficiency 
in these areas as part of the capstone jroject and internship. 

Course Requirements 
Core (18 credit hours) 

• 9 credit hours in analytical courses fiom the following: 
CSC -610 Introduction to Geogr^hic InfomBtion 

SystenB (3) 
CSC -689 Topics in Computer Science; 

Simulation and Modeling (3) 

Infbrmaticsand Analytics (3) 
SrAT-514 Statistical Methods (3) 
SrAT-525 Statistical Software (3) 
Internship and Capstone IVoject 

• One of the following; 
BIO-e91 Internship (6) 
CHEM-691 hitemship(6) 
CSC-691 hitemdiip (6) 
ENVS-69 llntemship (6) 

• One of the following: 

BIO-697 Research Me&ods in Biology (3) 



106 College of Arts and Sciences 



CSC-694 Capstone PiDJect (3) 
ENVS-681 Environmental Research Seminar 
and Practicum (3) 

Concentratioii (18 credit hours) 

Applied Computing 

• CSC-520 Algorithms and Data Structures (4) 

• CSC-546 Introduction to Computer Networks (3) 

• CSC-570 Database Management Systems (3) 

• 9 credit hours as approved by of the faculty advisor, 
including from the following: 

CSC-543 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (3) 
CSC-544 Object-Oriented Programming (3) 
CSC-568 Artificial Intelligence (3) 
CSC-589 Topics in Con^ter Science (3) 
CSC-689 Topics in Conputer Science (3) 
Biotechnology 

• BIO-583 Molecular Biology (3) 



• BIO-589 Topics in Biology: 
Bioinformaticsand Oenomics (3) 

• CHEM-5eOBiochenistryI(3) 

• 9 credit hours as approved by of the feculty advisor, including 
from the following: 

BIO-589 Topics in Biology 

BIO-677 Special Topics in Developmental Biology (1) 
BIO-679 Topics in Evolutionaiy Biology (1) 
CHEM-589 Topics in Biochemistry (3) 
Environmental Science and Assessment 

• ENVS-580 Einvironmental Science L A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 

• ENVS-581 Emvironmental Science II: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 

• ENVS-575 Enviromnental Ridf Assessment (3) 

• 9 credit hours as approved by 4ie faculty advisor, from areas 
such as conservation biobgy, ecology, or toxicology 



Economics 



Chair John A. Willoughby 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a B. Beigmam (Distinguished 

Professor ErrKrita), WD. Bowles, T.F. Deni)urg,P.C. Thanh, 

HJVL. Vi^htel, JK Weaver 

Profess3r R.A. Blecker, IE. Bioder, R. Feinbeig, A. Golan, 

R Hahnel, T Husted, R. I. Lerman, M. Meurs, R Miiller, 

L. Sawers, J. Willougbby, J. D. Wisman 

Associate Professor M. Flora, M. Hazilla, 

A. Isaac, W. Paiic, P Winters, E. E Meade 

Assistant Professor E. Catilina, M. Hansen, M. Heracleous, 

S. Headlee.T Hertz, K. Olson, M. Starr 
Distinguished E^nomist in Readence Q Ayittey 

The Department of Economics at American University 
emphasizes economic studies that enaUe graduates to partid- 
pate actively in the process of finding answers to ttie iirportant 
economic questions that face our society and other nations of 
the world. Emphasis is placed on viewing economic problenB 
in both their domestic and international contexts. 

The university's location in Washington, D.C. enables it to 
assist students and graduates in obtaining eirployment and in- 
tanships in several of the world's most important economic in- 
stitutions, including the World Bank, the International 
Monetary Fund, research institutes, and the treasury, labor, and 
cotnmace departments. Many of our graduates find pol- 
icy-making positions in the pubhc and private sectors of both 
the United Sates and other nations. 

The Department of Economics adopts a plurahstic ap- 
proach to economics education that includes neoclassical. 



Keynesian, and institutional economics as well as political 
eoonoiny. International economic issues receive ^)ecial empha- 
sis, as do such socially-important topics as the economics of 
gender. The neoclassical and Keynesian traditions form the core 
of economic theory that our majors are expected to master. The 
study of economic history, the history of economic thought, and 
alternative economic methodologies alert students to divergent 
perspectives and to the role of institutions. Courses in coirqaara- 
tive economic policies and post-Keynesian economics widen 
the range of fields available. Courses in speciali2Ed fields deal 
with monetary economics, public finance and government, de- 
veloprrent, ttie stmcture of U.S. industry, international trade and 
finance, and the economics of earnings and emptayment. 

The B.S. in Economics provides rigorous training in eco- 
nomic fiieory, economdrics, and quantitative skills and prepares 
students for research positions or graduate woik. Within the 
B A. in Economics students choose the genaal or international 
track. The major is designed to altow students the flexiMity of a 
double major with otho- departments in the College of Arts and 
Sdences, Sdiool of Intemational Service, Kogod School of 
Business, Sdiool of Public Affairs, and School of Communica- 
tion. 

Master's programs include the M.A. in Economics with 
tracks in economics, development, financial economic policy, 
and businesa The PhX). in Economics offers tracks in main- 
stream and heterodox economics and allows students to spe- 
cialize in microeoonomics or macroeconomics. 
Study Abroad 

American University's AU Abroad program offers study 
abroad programs in which students take courses, participate in 
internships, and iiteract withpuUic officials and political lead- 



EcooDtnics 107 



ers. Students wishing to use courses from study abroad pro- 
giaiTK to count as ttieir capstone mist obtain appnival ol° the 
undergraduate advia)r. 
Honor Society 

A chapter of Omicion Delta Epsilon, the economics honor 
society, is active on campus. Membership requires an overall 
grade point average of 3.25 and a grade point average of 3.50 in 
economics courses. Consult the undergraduate advisor for fur- 
ther eUgiMity requiremaits. 
Special Opportunities 

• The Simon Naidel Dissertation Fellowship is awarded for a 
promising dissertation close to completion. 

• Several student prizes are awarded eadi spring; 

The Simon Naidel Prize for the best performance on a 

compiehenave examination in economic theory 

The Frank Teunagna Prize for excellence in international 

finance and monetary economics 

The Jose Epstein Prize in Etvelopmeri Finance 

The James Weavw Prize for Excellence in Teaching 

B.A. in Economics 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and the approval of ttie department 
undei;graduate advisor. The department counsels freshmen and 
transfer students. 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of coU^e mathematics or 4ie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouses, consisting ofoneibundationcouise and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence fitnneadi 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Tracks 

General or Intonational 

Major Requirements 

• 37 credit hours with grades of C or b*er 

• For the International track, demonstration of inteimediate 
level or higher competence in one modem foreign language 

Course Requirements 
Core (16 credit hours) 

• ECON-IOO/ECON-IOOG Macroeconomics 4: 1(3) 

• ECON-200/ECON-200GNEcit)econcniics4:2(3) 

• BCON-300 Inteimedijte Nficroeoonomics (3) 



nCON-500 Microecom^mics (3) 

• ECON-301 Intennediate Macroeconomics (3) 
or 

BCON-50I Macroeconomics (3) 

• SrAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

General 

• 21 credit hours in economics couises (ECON-xxx) at ttie 300 
level or above 

ECON-480 Research Seminar in Economics is 
recomrtBnded. Studerte may take no more than two of the 
following: ECON-370 hitematicoal Economics, ECON-371 
International Economics: Trade, and ECON-372 
International Economics: Finance. One course at the 300 
level may be taken outside of ttie Economics Department 
with the advisor's approval if the couree is closely related to 
economics. No more than 6 of these credit hours may be 
fulfilled by Washington Economic Pdicy Semester courses, 
economics courses from study abroad programs, or 
ECON-498/499 Senior Honors l/II. No more than 3 credit 
hours of independent leading and study courses, internships, 
and co-ops may be used to satisfy this requirement. 
International 

• ECON-371 International Eoononics: Trade (3) 

• ECON-372 IntematioiBl Economics: Fitumce (3) 

• One ofthe following: 

ECON-351 Conparative Economics Systems (3) 
ECON-358 Economics of &e World Regions (3) (topics) 
BCON-361 Econamic Development (3) 
BCON-5 52 Economics of Transition (3) 

• One ofthe following: 

IBUS-300 Fimdamentals of International Business (3) 
SIS-385 International Econwnic Pohcy (3) 
SIS-465 International Trade and Investment Relations (3) 
SIS-466 IntematioDal Monetary and Financial Relations (3) 

• 9 credit hours ofadditional economics courses (ECON-xxx) 
at the 300 level or above, excluding EOON-370 International 
Economics 

ECON-480 Research Seminar in Economics is 
recommended. No more than 6 of these credit hours may be 
flilillled by Washington Economic PoUcy Semester courses, 
economics courses from study abroad programs, or 
BCON-498/499 Senior Honors I/II. No imre than 3 credit 
hours of indepeixlent leading and study courses, internships, 
and co-ops may be used to satisfy this requirertHit. 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors FVogiam have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with Lfaiveisity Honors in the major To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honois woric 
in the department and, upon departmental recommendation, 
graduate with University Honors in the HBJor. The department's 
Honors coordinator advises students in ttie University Ffonois 
Program regaidingdepaitmental options. 



108 College of Arts and Sciences 

B.S. in Economics 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
agp of 200 (on a 4.00 scale) and the approval of the departmait 
underg^uate advisor The department counsels freshmen and 
transfer students. 

University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit houR 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mafltematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation couise 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence from 
each of the Gve curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 48 oedit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• ECON-100/ECON-100GMaaoecoBomics4:l(3) 

• ECaM-200/ECON-200G Microeconomics 4 : 2 (3) 

• ECON-300 Intermediate Microeconomics (3) 
or 

ECON-500 Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-301 Intemiediate Macroeconomics (3) 
or 

ECON-501 Macroeconomics (3) 

• ECQ^-322 Introduction to Econometrics (4) 

• ECON-480 Researdi Seminar in Economics (3) 

• ECON-505 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

• MArH-211 Applied Calculus I (4) 
or 

MArH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• STAr-202BasicStatisrics(4) 

• One of the following 

ACCr-240 PriiKiples of Accounting (3) 
CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Scieo* I (4) 
MArH-212 AppUed Calcuhis TL (3) 
MATH-222 Calculus H (4) 
MArH-310 Linear Algebra (3) 

• 15 credit hours of additional economics courses 
(ECON-xxx) at the 300 level or above, excluding 
ECON-370 Intemational Economics; 

No more than 6 of these credit hours may be ililfilled by 
WadiingtoD Economic Policy Semester courses, economics 
courses fiom study abroad programs, or EOON-498/499 
Senior Honors I/IL No more than 3 credit hours of 



independent reading and study courses, internships, and 
co-ops may be used to satisfy fliis requiranent 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have the opportu- 
nity to graduate with Lhiversity Honors in flie major. To do so, 
students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors woik in 
the department and, upon departmental recommendation, gradu- 
ate wife University Honois in the major The department's 
Honors cooidinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. 

Washington Semester in Economic Policy 

This one-semester undergraduate jMogram draws on the 
unique environment of Waiington, DC. to introduce students 
to governmental pohcymaking as it relates to intemational and 
domestic economic policy through seminars, internships, and re- 
search. Students earn undergraduate credit wiiich may be apfiied 
toward the requirements for a bachelor's degree. 

Admission to the Program 

The program is open to American Univeraty students and 
students fixjmafBliated institutions fiom across the country. Re- 
quirements ftjr admission to the program indude nomination by 
a Washington Semester Program representative (at affiliated 
member schools), a minimum grade point average of 250 (on a 
4.00 scale); introdictory courses in economics; and at least sec- 
ond-semester sophomore standing at the time of partidp>aticn. 

Requirements 

• ECCS^-383 Wadiinglon Economic Policy Semester 

Seminar I (4) 

• ECON-384 Washington Economic Ptohcy Semester 

Seminar 11 (4) 

• ECON-385 Washington Economic Policy Semester 

Internship (4) 

• ECON-490Indepeaient Study Project (4) 
or 

Elective course fiom university evening course offerings 

Minor in Economics 

• ISciedit hours with grades ofC or better and at least 12 aedit 
houis unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ECON-100/ECON-100GMaaoeconomics4:l(3) 

• ECON-200/ECON-200G Microeconomics 4: 2 (3) 

• ECON-300 Intamediate Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-301 Intamediate Macroeconomics (3) 

• 6 additional credit hours in economics at the 300 level or above 
(not including independent study, Washington Semester 
courses, intemAips, or co-ops). No more 4ian 3 of these credit 
hours may be fulfilled by economics courses from study 
abroad programs. 



Economics 109 



Combined B.A. or B.S. and M.A. in 
Economics 

Admission to the Program 

Interested students ^oukl apfiy to the program in their ju- 
nior year. Students in this program will not be required to take 
the Graduate Recoid Examination (ORE). Students will be ad- 
mitted formally to M. A. status only after they have completed 
all requiremerts forthe B.A. orB S. in Economics with acumu- 
latiw grade pcant average of 3 00 or higher 

Requirements 

• All requirements for the B.A or B.S. in Eoonorrics 
Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hoursof ajiproved 
500-level course work in economics to satisfy the 
requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the MA. in Economics, including a 
minimum of 24 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undeigraduate degree has been 
awarded. 

M.A. in Economics 

Admission to the Program 

Applicants must meet the mininuim university requiremaits 
for graduate study. Admission is based on the academic record 
and two letters of recommendation. In general, a B+ average in 
undergraduate or previous graduate course work is required. 
The Graduate Record Examination (ORE) general test is 
required. Admission is not automatic for students who quaUfy 
and may be limited by progranmatic constraints. 

A student whose undergraduate background does not meet 
the standards for admission may be considered for adrrissicn 
afta- conpleting 12 credit hours of ai^aoved graduate course 
work in nondegree status with a grade point average of at least 
3.50 (on a 4.00 scale). ECON-500 Microeconomics, 
ECON-501 Macroeconomics, and ECCN-505 Introduction to 
Mafeematical Economicsmust be tsken within these 1 2 hours. 

Tracks 

General, Development Economics, Finaicial Economic 
Policy, or Business Economics 

Degree Requirements 

• 30^36 credit hours of approved graduate course work; 
including 6 wedit horns of core courses in economic theory, 6 
credit hours to fiilfill the researdi requirement, and 18-24 
credit hours of other required courses or electives 
Rerequisite credit (including ECON-603) does not count 
toward the degree. All courses mist be taken for grades (the 
pasa'&il option is not permitted).No more than 3 credit homs 
of ECCN-691 Internship nay be takea 

• Research requirement: 

Thesis: ECON-797 Master's Thesis Saninar (6) with grades 
of B or better and submissicn of apjjroved thesis 



Nonthesis: ECCaM-523 Econonstrics I and ECC8M-524 
EconcHnetrbs II with grades of B or better 

• Comprehensive examination in economic flieory taken after 
the student has completed ECXJN-500 and ECON-501; 
students are allowed t\w) retakes. 

Course Requirements 
Prerequisite Courses 

• ECON-300 Intermediate Microeoononics (3) and 
BCON-301 InteroKdiate Macroeconomics (3) 

or 

ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 

• MArH-211AppKed Calculus (4) 

• SrAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

Waiver of these pioequisites may be granted for qualified per- 
sons with comparable prior education or experience. 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• BCON-500 Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-501 Macroeconomics (3) 

• B::ON-523Ecoix>metricsl(3) 

• BCON-524 Econometrics I (3) 

ECON-500, BCON-501, and ECCN-505 (or approved substi- 
tutes) must be cortpleted within the first 9 credit hours of the 
program 

Tracks (18-24 cedit hours) 

• 18-24credit hours of apjHoved graduate course wDik in one 
of the folio wign tracks 

General (1 8 credit hours) 

• ECON-505 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

• 15 additional credit hours of approved graduate course woik 
in economics; 3 credit hours may be taken outside the 
Economics Department wifli the advisor's approval. 

Development Economics (24 credit hours) 

• BCON-662Devdopment Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-663 Development Macroeconomics (3) 

• 18 credit hours from ftie following: 

ECON-505 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 
BCON-552 Economics of Transition (3) 
ECON-573 Labor Economfcs (3) 
ECON-574 Women in the Economy (3) 
ECON-579 Environmental Economics (3) 
ECON-611 Survey of International Economics (3)* 
BCON-630 Monetary Theory and Policy (3) 
BCON-633 Financial Economics (3) 
BCON-634 Development Finance and Banking (3) 
ECON-635 International Capital Markets (3) 
BCON-658 Ecommics of the Wrald Regions (3) (topics) 
BCON-665 Project Evaluation in Developing Countries (3) 
BCON-671 Intemational Economics: Trade (3)* 
ECON-672 Intemational Economics: Finance (3)* 
ECON-691 hitenKhip(l-3) 



110 College of Arts and Sciences 



ECON-788 Seminar in Economic DevelopmeiS (3) 
*Studentsmaynot receive credit forECON-611 iftheytake 
either ECON-671 orECa<-672. 

The 18 oedit houis may include vqj to 12 credit hoxa^ 
fionthe following: 
SIS-616 taternational Economics (3) 
SIS-632 Mcrofinance: Concepts and Tods 
SIS-635 Advanced Topics in Development Management (3) 
SIS-637 fcternational Development (3) 
SIS-650 Global Economy and Sustainable DevelopnoBnt (3) 
(prerequisite; SIS-637 Intemational Development) 
SIS-651 Managing Economic Policy Reform (3) 
Financial Economic Policy (24 credit hours) 

• ACCT-607 Accounting Concepts and AppUcations (3) 

• ECON-505 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 

• ECON-633 Financial Economics (3) 

• ECON-641 Policy Issues in Financial Econonics (3) 

• FIN-614 Financial Management (3) 

• 9 credit hours fiwm ttie following: 
ECON-541 PubUc Economics (3) 

ECON-547 Economics of Antitrust and Regulation (3) 
ECON-634 Development Finance and Banking (3) 
ECON-635 Intemational Capital Markets (3) 
ECON-663 Development Macroeccmomics (3) 
ECON-672 International Economics: Finance (3) 
ECON-691 Internship (1-3) 

FIN-672 hvestment Analysis and Portfolio Management (3) 
FIN-674 Derivatives and Risk Management (3) 
FIN-676 Financial Institutions (1 .5) 
IBUS-700 hitematioDal Finance (3) 
IBUS-701 hitennational Banking (\5) 
Business Economics (24 credit hours) 

• nN-630 Financial Analysis: Concepts and Applications 
(3) 

• rrEC-63 1 Operations and Information Managemeifi (3) 

• MKTO-632 Fundamentals of Marketing (3) 

• 3 credit hours from ftie following: 

IBUS-636 Global Strategy and Management (1.5) 
IBUS-637 Cross-Cultural Management (1.5) 
MGMT-633 Leading People and Oiganizations (3) 
MGMT-634 High-Performance Teams (1.5) 
MGMT- 635 Ethics, Social ReqwnabUity, and 
Governance (1.5) 

• 12 oedit hours of approved graduate courses in economics 

Ph.D. in Economics 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minirmm university require- 
HEnts £)r graduate study, applicants mist earn a satis&ctory 
score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general 
tests (verbal, math, analytical). The GRE test in economics is 



recommended. Admission is based on academic record, test 
scores, and at least two letters of recommendatba Apphcants 
who are not native speakers of English must submit the results of 
TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language). In general, a 
B+ avaage for previous undergraduate work or a B+/A- average 
for previous graduate work, whichever is more recent, is the 
minimum required. (Most students admitted ha\« hi^ier grade 
averages.) As a rule, students are admitted for the fall semester 
only; apphcetion mist be made by the previous February 1 inor- 
Aa to be considered for financial support 
Tracks 

Mainstream and Heterodox 
Degree Requirements 

• 72 oedit hours of approved graduate wodt 

48 credit hours must be taken in designated courses; no nBre 
than 40 percent of course work and no more than 6 hours of 
independent study orreading courses (exclusive of dissert^on 
houis) may be taken with any one professor. Credit may be 
given for previous graduate work in accordance with 
university academic regulations. 

• Tools of leseaidi 

The following courses must be conpleted with grades of B- or 

bettar 

ECON-619 U.S. Economic History 

or 

ECON-618 Economic History of Europe and ttie World 

ECON-620 Economic Thaughl 

ECON-705 Mathematical Ecoiwmic Analysis 

ECON-723 Econometric Methods 

ECON-724 Advanced Econometric Methods 

• Field Requirement 

Students nust take amajor fieldand minor field Conpleting a 
major field requires a grades ofB- or better in two designated 
field courses and the satisfactory completion of a 
conqirehaisive exam. Craipleting a minor field requires a B- 
or better in two designated field courses. Courees can not be 
applied to two different fields. 

• Four conprehoisive examinations: 

Preliminary theory: ECON-702andECON-703must be taken 

corrpleted before taking hs examination 

Advanced theory: 

Mainstream: ECON-712 and ECON-713 mist be taken 

convicted before taking ftie examination 

Heterodox: ECON-701 and ECON-711 must be taken 

completed before taking the examination 

One field comprehaisive 

Defense of dissertation piop>osal 

• Dissertation and oral corrprehaisive 

The student obtains approval for the dissotation topic firoman 
interested faculty member in the field who tfien becomes diair 
of the dissertation committee. This comnittee, especially the 
chair, supervises the preparation of the dissertation and 



Economics 1 1 1 



reviews it when it is coirpleted. An oral comprehensive 
examination on the dissertation proposal is given by the 
committee before its submission for approval. 
Students must attend the dissertation seminar in their thiid 
year, or when they are working on their dissertation 
proposals. Between 6 and 24 credit hours of IiCON-799 
EXjctoral Dissertation Seminar, wiiich mist be taken pass/ fail, 
ait; taken while students corrplete theirproposals and prepare 
dissertations. A fter the completed dissertation is submitted to 
the conmittee, a final oral examinatioD is held. 

Course Requirements 

Theory (15 credit hours) 

The following courses mist be conpleted witti grades of B- or 

better 

Mainstream 

• BCON-701MicroPoliticalEcoir)myI(3 
or 

BCON-711 Macro PoKtical Ecoiwmy n (3) 

• ECON-702 Macroeconomic Analysis I (3) 

• BCON-703 MiciDecorwrrric Analysis I (3) 

• BCON-7 1 2 Macroeconomic Analysis II (3) 

• BCON-7 1 3 Microeconomic Analysis n (3 
Heterodox 

• BCON-701 Micro PoKtical Economy I (3) 

• BCON-7 02 Macroeconomic Analysis I (3) 

• BCON-703 Microeconomic Analysis I (3) 

• BCON-711 Macro Political Ecorr>my 11(3) 

• BCON-7 13 Microeconomic Analysis n (3) 
or 

BCON-7 1 2 Macroeconomic Analysis 11 (3) 
Fields (12 credit hours) 

• Two courses in each of two of the following fields completed 
with grades of B or better 

Comparative Econom ic Systems 

• BCON-551 Conparative Economic Systems {3} 

• BCON-552 Economics of Transition (3) 
Economic Growth and Development 

• BCON-662DevdopmBntMicroeconc«nics(3) 

• BCON-663 Development Macroeconomics (3) 
Economics of Gender 

• BCON-573LaborEconornfcs(3) 

• BCON-574 Women in the Economy (3) 
Industrial Organization 

• BCON-546 Industrial Economics (3) 

• ECON-547 Economics of Antitrust and Regulation (3) 
Labor Economics 

• BCON-573LaborEcoDomBs(3) 

• BCON-789 Seminar in Labor Econorrics (3) 



Monetary Economics 

• BCON-630 Mor>etary Economics (3) 

• BCON-633 Financial Ixonomics (3) 
Public Finance and Fiscal Policy 

• ECON-541 Public Economics (3) 

• PUAD-607 Economics and PoUtics ofPubKc Policy (3) 

Tools of Research (15 credit hours) 

The following courses rrust be conpleted with grades ofB- or 
better 

• BCON619U.S. Economic History (3) 
or 

BCON 618 Economic History of Europe aol the World (3) 

• BCON 620 Economic Thought (3) 

• BCON 705 Mathematical Economic Analysis (3) 

• ECON723Econometric Methods (3) 

• BCON 724 Advanced Econometric Methods (3) 

Research Seminar (6 credit hours) 

• ECON 782 Seminar in Empirical Macroeconomics (3) (for 
students wl» have takrai ECON-702, ECON-71 1, and 
BCON-7 12) 

or 

ECON 783 Seminar in Empirical MicroecoMmics (3) 
(fiw students who have taken ECON-701 , BCON-703, and 
ECON-71 3) 

• one oflier seminar aj^aoved by department 

Graduate Certificate in Applied 
Microeconomics 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree from an accred- 
ited institution 

Certiflcate Requirements 

• IScredit hours of approved course work wifli at least 6credit 
hours at the 6004evel or above, with grades of C or better 
Course work includes 9 credit hoirs ofcore requrremerrts and 
9 credit honrs of electives. Prerequisite credit does not cotmt 
toward the certificate. AU courses must be taken for grades 
(flie pass/fail option is not permitted). Grades of C- or D in 
certificate program courses are not accepted toward the 
fulfillment of certificate requirerrents, although these grades 
wiU be included in the calculation of the GPA. Students must 
have at least a 3.0 GB\ in certificate courses in order to be 
awarded a certificate. Students in certificate programs must 
take a minimum of 6 credit hours during each 12-montti 
period and complete the certificate in four years. International 
students must enroll in 9 credit hours each semester (except 
for simmer). A maximum of 3 credit hours earned at an 
accredited college or university may be applied toward the 
oatificate as transfer credit. 



112 College of Arts and Sciences 



Course Requirements 
Prerequisite Courses 

• ECON-300 Intermediate Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-301 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3) 

• MArH-2 11 Applied Calculus (4) 

• STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

W^verof these prerequisites may be granted for qualified pet- 
sons wife comparable prior education or experience. 
Core (9 credit hours) 

• ECON-500 Microeconomics (3) 

• ECON-505 Introduction to Mathematical Ecoixnmcs (3) 

• ECON-5 22 Econometrics (3) 

Electives (9 credit hours) 

• 9 credit hoiirs from flie following: 
ECON-541 PubUc Economics (3) 
ECON-546 Industrial Economics (3) 

ECON-547 Economics of Antitrust and Regulation (3) 
ECON-573 Labor Economics (3) 
ECON-574 Women in the Economy (3) 
ECCS^-579 Environmental Ecaoomics (3) 
ECON-630 Monetaiy Theory and Policy (3) 
ECON-633 Financial Economics (3) 
ECCSV-662 Development Microeconomics (3) 
ECON-665 Project Evaluation in Developing Countries (3) 
ECON-671 International Economics: Trade (3) 
ECON-672 International Economics: Finance (3) 
Other approved electives may be substituted with 
departmental approval 

Graduate Certificate in International 
Economic Relations 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree fiom an accred- 
ited institution. 



Certificate Requirements 

• 1 5 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
houis at ttie 600-level or above, with grades of C or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted towaid the fiilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although ttiese grades will be included in he calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
couises in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit horns 
during eadi 12-monfli period and complete the certificate in 
four years International students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maximan of 3 credit 
houis earned at an accredited collie or university may be 
apptied toward ttie certificate as transfer credit 

Course Requironents 
Core 

• ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 
(students witii sufficient background in economics may 
substitute an additional economics course fiom the list of 
electives, below) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in International Affairs (3) 

• ECC8^-611 Survey of International Economics (3) 
or 

SIS -6 16 International Economics (3) 
Electives 

• 3 credit hours from the fcJIowing: 

ECON-5 51 Conparative Economic Systems (3) 
ECON-5 52 Economics ofTransition (3) 
ECON-658 Economics of the VWarld Regions (3) (topics) 
ECON-661 Survey of Economic Development (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 

SIS-565 U.S. Economic Relations with Japan and China (3) 
SIS -630 Economic B3licy of the European Union (3) 
SIS-651 Managing lEconomic PoUcy Reform (3) 
SIS-665 International Trade and Investment Relations (3) 
SIS-666 Internationa] Monetary and Financial Relations (3) 



School of Education, Teaching and Health 



Dean Sarah Irvine Belson 

Director of Teacher Education Karen DiGiovanm 

FuU-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a C.A. Gross, D.S. Geiser, YE. Hawke, 

BA. HDdinkD,.W. Hubbell.RD. Leedy, N.J. Long, 

MJ. Safiit, R Whitfield 

Professor F. Jacobs, RC. Karch, D. Sadker, S.L Smitti, 
CA. Tescoiri, Jr 

Associate Ftafessor Ekneritus/a F.E. Hubo; 
C£. Messeismith, B.Q Coward, L.Q Nyce, 
P. O'Connor Finn, B.J. Reimann 



Associate Professor S. Irvine Belson, L Fox, A. Celling, 

V. Vasquez 

Assistant Professor Y. Chikamoto, P. Mehlert, F. Ramos 

In Residence M Clark .J. Percoco, C. Rodriquez, 
M Thortpson, M Schaefiei; J. Wright 

The School of Education, Teaching and Health (SETH) of- 
fers programs that prepare teachers, educational leaders and 
managa^, educational specialists, health promotion ^lecialists, 
and researcbers for careers in schools, colleges and universities, 
federal, state and local govemmect agaicies^ business, and com- 
munity and professional organizations. These programs pmjvide 



School of EducatiDn, Teaching and Health 1 1 3 



studt-nts with opportxmities to collaborate with professionals in 
public stiiools, educational orgam2ations, and federal agencies 
through internships, pradica, and research. Training in interna- 
tional education prepares graduates for careeis in international 
organizations, nongovernmental organizations, international 
schools, and govemmeii agaiciea Degree programs can be 
coirpleted on a fiill or part time basis. 

The SETH faculty and programs demonstrate a commit- 
ment to ttie advancement of knowledge about the nature, func- 
tion, and practice ofeducatioa Faculty conduct a wide range of 
research initiatives with emphasis on equity, gender, health pro- 
motion, multiculturahsm, nutrition, socioeconomic status, 
learners with special needs, the infusion of technology into edu- 
cation, adult learning, and the relationship of government and 
public pohcy to education. ThanescommDn to faculty research 
and programs include fair educational opportunity, meeting the 
needs of special learners, improving pubhc health, research in- 
formed pohcy development, as well as international and domes- 
tic formal and non-formal education. Students benefit from 
working with a highly quahfied and dedicated faculty in small 
classes, and from opportunities to participate in ongoing fiiculty 
research aimed at influencing educational policy and practice. 
In our shared view, the fields of education, teaching and healtti 
encompass the entire well-being of an individual-inteUectually, 
enwtionaUy, socially, environnBntally, and spiritually. 

Education and Teaching Programs 

On flie undergraduate level, the school offers a Bachelor of 
Arts in Elementary EuJucation and a second mqor in Secondary 
Education, which lead to eUgibihty for certification to teach 
Minors in education studies and special education are also of- 
fered. 

A minor in education studies acconmodates undergraduate 
students interested in the study of education asa liberal or social 
science discipline. R serves students who intend to pursue grad- 
uate study in education or related fields, those who wish to ex- 
plore career opportunities in education and related fields, and 
those whose primary job and career opportunities are enhanced 
through the study ofeducatioa For students interested in broad- 
ening their knowledge and understanding of education for stu- 
dents wifli special needs, a minor in special education is also 
ofiered. Students seeking certification to teach or who plan to 
pursue graduate education in this field are especially well 
served by this minor. 

The school also offers graduate programs that lead to K-1 2 
certificatkni. Students interested in teaching in elementary or 
secondary schools or in programs for Enghsh for speakers of 
other languages (ESOL) or international training and developn 
ment enroU in the Masterof Arts in Teaching (M.AT.). A dual 
degree program leading to the M. AT. and the MA in Interna- 
tional Peace aal Conflict Resolution fiom the School of Inter- 
national Service is available. Those interested in working as 
special education resource teachers or in learning disabiUties 
classrooms at all levels enroll in the M. A in Special Education 
Learning DisabUities. The Master of Education (MEd.) in Cur- 
riculum and IrKtruction is designed for students with a back- 



ground in educational theory and practice and offers extended 
study in &e field and in areas of elementary education, second- 
ary education, and educational technology. 

The Graduate Certificate in Teaching is designed for stu- 
dents withbachelorls degrees in the arts, sciences, orhumanities 
and several years ofresponsible woik experierKc. Students who 
corrplete the program and pass the appropriate teacher's exami- 
nation are ehgible to apply for certification (Ucensure) in the 
District of Columbia. Those with such certification are ehgible 
for reciprocal certification in over 40 states. 
Teacher Education Program 

Selective admissions criteria allow the School of Education, 
Teaching and Healfli to emphasize early and sustaiied contact 
with children, youth, and adult learners. Students \M3ik closely 
with master teachers and clinical supervisors intheirfieldplace- 
ments in and around Wadunglon, DC. The teacher preparation 
programs benefit firom the rich resources of the Washington 
area, including opportunities for internships in settings such as 
the Challenga- Center for Space Science Education, the Na- 
tional Museum of Natural History, and the Washington Lab 
School, an internationally known school for students with learn- 
ing disabihties. 
Field Placements 

Field experiences, pBCticum pdacements, and student teach- 
ing take place in the District of Columbia and ttie greater Wash- 
ington rretropohtan area, incltiding Maryland and Wgiriia and 
are designed to give students experience in botti urban and sub- 
urban schools. The director of teacher education arranges as- 
signnents, taking into account student needs and preferences. 
Accreditation and Certiflcation 

The school is accredited by the National Coundl for the Ac- 
creditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the State 
Agarcy Board of Education of the District of Columbia. 

The BA. in Elementary Education, second major in Sec- 
ondary Education, Masto- of Arts in Teaching (MA.T), M.A 
in Special Education: Learning Disabihties, and Graduate Cer- 
tificate in Teaching are approved by the National Association of 
State Directors of Teacher Education and Certification 
(NASDTEC). The following secondary teaching fields are ap- 
proved by NASDTEC: biology, chemistry, dance, drama, Eng- 
lish, French, German, mathematics, physics, Spanish, and 
corrprehaisive social studies. Students interested in other sub- 
jects may be certified by the District of Colurrbia. For more in- 
formation students should consult the director of teacher 
education 

Students admitted to graduate teacher education programs 
may be required to comjiete additional course work in order to 
be ehgible for certification ujxn graduation. Students will be in- 
formed of additional requirements upon adrrdssiorL 
Ongoing Assessment of Academic and Professional 
Performance 

Students are expected to maiirtain cumulative grade point 
averages specific to each program; receive satisfactory evalua- 
tiors in field and methcxls placements; obtain a satis&ctory an- 



1 14 CoDege of Arts and Sciences 



nual evaluation from the Teacher Education Committee based 
upon academic, professional, and perfomifflice criteria est^- 
lished by the connrittee; meet specific course grade require- 
ments; conplete all Praxis I and subject area appiopriate 
Ptaxis n examinations', and submit an electronic professional 
portfoho. 

Students in the B.A. in Elementary Education program 
trust maintain an overall cumulative grade point avaage of 
2.70 or highCT. Students in the undergraduate second rtBJor in 
Secondary Education mist maintain an oveiall grade point av- 
erage of 2.70 and 3.00 or hi^er in their pnimary rtBJor. Gradu- 
ate students must mainbin a cumulative grade point average of 
3.00 or higher. 
Report of American University State Assessments, 
Requirements, and Standards for Teacher 

Certification and Licmsure, and Performance of 
Teacher Preparation Programs 

In compliance with Section 207 of the Higher Education 
Act, American University is providing information regarding 
state assessments, otha- requirements, standards for teacher 
catification and licensure, and performance of teacher prepa- 
ration programs. 

American University's teadier preparation programs are 
^jproved by the District of Colurabia and nationally accredited 
by the National Coxmcil forttie Accreditation of Teacher Edu- 
cation ^C ATE), the organiaation responsible for professional 
accreditation of teacher education 

There is a commitment to a strong general education foun- 
dation ft)r students befcse their acceptance into the School of 
Education, Teaching and Health. Teacher preparation pro- 
grams are organized around four interrelated principles (eq- 
uity, comnunity, diversity, and excellence) and are based on a 
conceptual framework that recognizes the importance of 
knowledge, beliefe, practice, and reflection. 

In academic year 2003-2004, 437 studoits were enrolled in 
teacherpreparation programs; 1 10 of these students were in su- 
f)ervised student teaching progrartB. Twenty one &culty mem- 
bers induding four fiill time faculty in professiorsl edtx^ation, 
and seventeen part time faculty members (adjunct faculty) su- 
pervised and'or taught students in flie teacher education pro- 
gram. The student/faculty ratio was 4:1. The average hours per 
week requited of students ki the program was 35 hours per 
week over fourteei weeks, fiw a total of 490 hours. 

Aggregate and Summary of Institution-Level 

Pass-Rate Data: Regular Teacher Preparation 

Program 



Type of AssesaneiTt 


Institutiona] 
Pass Rale 


Statewide 
Pass Rate 


Aggr^ate- Basic Skills 


89% 


92% 


Surrmary 


88% 


88% 



Health and Fitness Programs 

Health issues have universal interest and appeal, transcend- 
ing flie boundaries of race, rehgion, culture, and national origin. 
Over the past two decades, the inporfance of maintaining or im- 
proving one's well-being throu^ health-aihancjng behaviors 
has become self evident. Responding to these developrtBnts, the 
School of Education, Teaching, and Health ofiFers the following 
academic programs to students at Amoicem University. 

• Minor in Health Promotion 

• B.S. in Health Promotion 

• M.S. in Healtti PnDTTDtion Management 

Additionally, flie healfli promotion undergraduate program 
offers a variety of heaMi and fitness electives to American Lhi- 
versity students. These electives provide students with enjoyable 
opportmities to engage in physical activity throu^ courses such 
as aerobic dance, wei^t training yoga, golf, and many others. 
Exploratory courses within flie field ofliealth promotion are also 
open to all American Ltaiversity students, sudi as care and pre- 
vention of aftiletic injuries and sports psychology. 

American University's National Center for Health Fitness 
(NCHF) is an integral part of the health pronaotbn degree pro- 
grams. NCHF manages the Lhited States Postal Service's health 
piDmotion program for their errployees and also collaborates 
wife American University's Jacobs Fitness Center located on 
campus Students in the health promotion degree {Hograms are 
offered the opiportunity for experiential learning inhealfliptmo- 
tion programming and fitness conditioning through part-lime, 
fiiU-time, and intemsh^) positions at both sites. 

Students enrolled in American Univeratys health promotion 
degree programs benefit Soma strong ahimni network that pro- 
vides professional connections for informational interviews; in- 
ternships, and occasional employment. Many alumni are 
enplojed locally, making iBtworidng opportunities highly ac- 
cessible to students. Furthermore, the healfti promotion degree 
programs benefit fi-om the Washington, D.C. location of 
well-known organizaticns whose purpose is to isxsprave pMic 
health, such as specific departments of the federal government, 
national non-profits, and global corporations. In particular, our 
students have benefited fiwm internships, cooperative-education, 
anJ presentations from organizations sudi as the National Can- 
cer Institute, National Business Group on Health, Center forSci- 
ence in the Public Interest, AARP, Presidenfs Council on 
Physical Fitness and Sports, and flie National Coalition for Pro- 
moting Physical Activity. Finally, there are ea abundance of an- 
nual conferences and meetings that take place in Washington, 
DC. aixl are available to students at a free or reduced rate whidi 
offer students invaluable networking experience and enhanced 



For additional information contact 202- 885- 6275 or 
healthfitness@amBrican.edu, or got to: 
www.americanedu/healflipromDtion 



School of Education, Teaching and Health 1 1 S 



B.A. in Elementary Education 

Admission to Candidacy in Teacher Education 

Undergraduates seeking teacher certificalion in elementary 
education should contact an advisor in the School ofl^ducation. 
Teaching and I fealth as early as possible. Adrrission to the uni- 
versity and declaration ofa magor does nc« constitute admission 
to candidacy in teacher education, which is based on academic 
and related performance criteria. 

To be admitted to candidacy, students rrust earn a passing 
score (as set by the District of Columbia teacher licensing 
agency) on the PRAXIS I; Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST); 
earn an average grade of 2.70 or higher in EDU-305 Schools 
and Society and EDU-320 Psychology of Education, pass 
EDU-321 Field Experience: Observation and Analysis, receive 
satisfactory recommendations from faculty, and haw an overall 
cmrulativc grade point average of 2.70 or higher The Teacha- 
Education Corrrnittee reviews student apphcations Decisions 
regarding admission to candidacy are made by this conxnittee 
based on academic performance and refo^nces. 

Liberal Arts and Science Requirements for Teacher 
Certification: Elementary 

To quahfy for teacher certification, students must have com- 
pleted an of the requirements from the specific curricular areas 
listed betow. Some requirements may overlap with the univer- 
sity General Education requirements. Consult a Schcwl of Edu- 
cation, Teaching and Health advisor for more information. 

• 6 credit hoirs in Uterature 

• 3 credit hoixs in music 

• 3 credit hours in studio art 

• 2 credit hours in health and nutrition 

• 2 credit hours in health and fitness 

• 6 O'edit hours in file social sdences including 3 credit hours in 
US. history 

• 3 credit hoiTS in the biological sciences 

• 3 credit hours in the jiiysical sciences 
Note: one of the sciences must incltxle a lab. 

University Requirements 

• Atotalofl20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hoirs of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college rtBthematics or ftie equivalent by 
examrnation 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouises,consistingofonefoimdationcourseand 
one second4evel course in an approved sequence fixjmeach 
of the five curricular areas 

• No TOOK than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Note: Studerds must consult with an advisor from the School of 
Education, Teaching and Health as early as possible to discuss 



the ooonitnation of General Educatioo requirements with oeitifi- 
cation requirerrKnts. 
Major Requirements 

• 74 credit hours with grades of C or better, including 15 to 17 
credit hours in a concentration 

• An overall cumulative gradepoinl average of2.70orhigher 

• All students must complete the Praxis II Exam prior to 
graduation. 

Course Requirements 

• EDU-205/EDU-205G Schools and Society 4: 2 (3) 

• EDU-250 Mathematics for Elemenlary School Teachers I (3) 

• EDU-251 Mathematics for Elementaiy School Teachers n (3) 

• EDU-31 9 Children's Literature: Multicultural and 

Iitemational Apfroaches (3) 

• EDU-320 Psychology of Education (3) 

• EDU-321 Field Experience: Observation and Analysis (1) 

• EDU-330InstruclionalStrategies and Teaching Meftiods (3) 

• EDU-362 Classn»m Management (3) 

• EDU-371 Foundations of Reading Instruction (3) 

• EDU-492 Service Learning in Teacher Education ( 1 ) 

• EDU-51 9 The Uses ofTechnology in Education (3) 

• IDU-Ml Foundationsof Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) 
or 
EDU-545 Overview of all ExceptionaUties: The Arts in 

Special Education (3) 

• EDU-552 Teachiig Mathematics in Elementary 

Education (3) 

• EDU-55 3 Teadiiig Language Arts in Elementary 

Education (3) 

• H3U-554 Teaching Social Shidies in Qerrmtary 

Education (3) 

• EDU-555 Teachiig Reading in Elementary Education (3) 

• EDU-556 Teaching Sdraioe in Elementiry Education (3) 

• EDU-499 Student Teaching (12) 

Concentration 

• 15-17 credit hours in one of the following concentrations in 
American Mstory, Art, Biotogy,, Literature, or Mathanatics 

American History (15 credit hours) 

• HIST-lOO/HIST-lOOGHiatoriansand the Living ftst 2:1 (3) 

• HIST-305/HIST-205GAniaican Encounters: 

1492-1865 2:2 (3) 

• HIST-21 5/HIST-21 5G Social Forces Itot Shaped 

America 2:2 (3) 

• One course from the following: 

HIST-206 The LMed States from Emancipation through 

Wjrld Warn, 1865-1945 (3) 
HIST-207 The IMed States since 1945 (3) 



116 College of Arts and Sciences 



HIST-208 A&ican-Airerican History to 1865 (3) 
fflST-209 Afiican-American History 1865 to Preseil (3) 
HIST-21(VHlST-210GEttmicity in America 4;2 (3) 
HIST-220/HIST-220G Women in America 4:2 (3) 

• One course fiom the following: 

HlST-350 Colonial America: 1492 to 1763 (3) 
HIST-35 1 Era of the Revolution and Constitution (3) 
HIST-352 The Era of the New RepubUc, 1 789-1 850 (3) 
HIST-353 Civfl War and Reconstruction (3) 
HIST-354 The South since Reconstiuction (3) 
HIST-355 Emergence of Modem America, 1 877-1 920 (3) 
HIST-356 Twentieth Century America (3) 
HIST-357 America between the Ware, 1919-1941 (3) 
HIST-358 Women in AnKricato 1850 (3) 
HIST-359 Women in America, 1850 to Resent (3) 
HIST-372 African American Women: Nineteenth Centmy 

Amaican Voice (3) 
HIST-373 Amaican Jewish History (3) 
HIST-376 Americans and their Environment (3) 

Art (15 credit hours) 

• ARTS-lOCyARTS-lOOG Art: The Studio ExperiaiDe 1:1 (3) 

• One couree from the following: 
ARTH-IOO/ARTH-IOOG European Art: FromCaveto 

Cathedral 2:1 (3) 
ARTH-101 European Art Renaissance to Present (3) 
ARTH-105/ARTH-105G Art: The Ifistorical 

Expaience 1 : 1 (3) 
ARTH-210/ARTH-210G Modem Art: Nineteenth and 

Twentiefli Centuries 1 :2 (3) 

• Three coirses from the following: 
AR're-205/AKrS-205O The Artist's PeRpective: Drawing 

1:2(3) 
ARTS-210/AKrS-210GThe Artist Is Perspective: Paiiiting 

1:2(3) 
ARTS-215/ARrS-2150 The ArtistTs Per^)ective: 

Scu^)turel:2(3) 
ARTS-320 Painting Studio (3) 
ARTS-340 Sculphne Studio (3) 
AR'IS-360 Drawing Shidio (3) 
ARTS-363 Relief Printmaking Studio (3) 
AR'IS-364 hitagho Studio (3) 

Biology (17 credit hours) 

• BIO-110/BlO-110OGeneralBiologyI5:l(4) 

• BIO-210/BIO-210OGeneral Biology II 5:2 (4) 

• Three courses from the following: 
BIO-200/BIO-200G Structure and Function ofthe 

Human Body 5:2 (3) 
BIO-220/BIO-220G The Case for Evolution 5:2(3) 
ENVS-240/ENVS-240GOceanogr^hy 5:2(3) 
ENVS-250/ENVS-250G Living in the 

Environment 5:2 (3) 



BIO-xxx 300-level or above course, with advisor's approval 
Literature (15 credit hours) 

• Lrr-120/L1T-120G Interpreting Literature 1:1 (3) 

• Lrr-125/Lrr-125GQreatBooksthat Shaped the Westem 

Worid2:l(3) 

• Two courses from the following: 
Lrr-210 Survey of American Literature 1(3) 
Lrr-21 1 Survey of American Literature U (3) 
LIT-220 Survey of British Literature I (3) 
Lrr-221 Survey of British Literature n (3) 
Lrr-225/Lrr-225G The African Writer 1 :2 (3) 
Ln-235/Lrr-235G African-American Literature 2:2 (3) 
Lrr-240/UT-240G Asian American Literahire 2:2 (3) 
Lrr-245/Lrr-245G The Experience of Poetry 1:2(3) 
LIT-270/1JT-27DG Transfcrmations of aake^ieare 1:2 (3) 

• LIT-xxx 300-level course, with advisor's approval 

Mathematics (17 credit liours) 

• Two courses at the 200-level to include: 
MATH-2 11 Applied Calculus 1 (4) and 
MATH-212 AppUedCalcuhJS H (3) 

or 

MATH-221 Calculus 1 (4) and 

MATH-222 Calculus H (4) 

• Three courses at the 300-level or above, with advisor's 
approval 

University Honors Program 

Students in ttie University Honors Program have ttie opportu- 
nity to graduate with University tfonors in flie major. To do so, 
students couple te 12 hours of advanced-level Honors woik in 
the school and, upon the school's recommendation, graduate 
with University Hanors in the mqor. The school's Honore coor- 
dinator advises students in the Univeisity Hdhots Program re- 
garding school options 

Secondary Edocation 

Admission to Candidacy in Teacher Education 

The undergraduate jirogram in Secondary Education is de- 
signed for students who wish to obtain teaching credentials in 
secondary education while completing their majors in the hu- 
manities, arts, natural and social sciences. To do so, students 
complete a second major in Secondary Education designed to 
meet certification requirements in the District of Columbia and 
make them ehgiWe for certification in over 40 states. Students 
should consult with the director of Teadier Education to coordi- 
nate their general and subject-area certification requirements 
with other univeraty and mqor requiranents. 

Undergraduates seeking teacher certification in secondary 
education should contact an advisor in the School of Education, 
Teaching and Health as early as possible. Admisaon to the uni- 
versity and declaration of a major does not constitute admission 
to candidacy in teacher education, which is based on acadardc 
and related perfomiance criteria. To be admitted to candidacy, 
students must cam a passing score (as set by the District of Co- 



School ofEducatbii, Teaching and Heahh 117 



lumbia teacher licensing agency) on the PRAXIS I: 
Pre-Professional Skills Test (FPST); earn an average grade of 
2.70 or higher in EDU-205 Schools and Society and EDU-32D 
Psychology of Educaticm, pass EDU-321 Field Experience: 
Observation and Analysis, receive satisfactory recommenda- 
tions from faculty, and have an ovarii cumulative grade point 
average of 2.70 or higher. Secondary Education majors must 
also have a 3 .00 grade point average in their primary major The 
Teacher Education Comnittee reviews student applications and 
makes decisions regarding adirission to candidacy. 
Liberal Arts and Science Requirements for Teacher 
Certification: Secondary 

To qualify for teacher ceitiflcatioo, students must complete sub- 
ject-area oertificaticn standards and U.S. Ifistory. These require- 
ments may overlap with General Education requirements. 
Major Requirements 

• 37 credit hours with grades of C or better 

• Completion of the major requirements with a cumulative 
^ade point average of3.00 inoneofthe following American 
Studies; Anthropology, Biology, CLEG (Communication, 
Legal histitutions. Economics and GovemnKnt); Chenistry, 
Economics; Environmental Studies; French Studies; Foreign 
Language and Comimnication Media; Justice; German 
Studies; History; International Studies; Language and Area 
Studies; Law and Society; Literature; Mathematics; 
Statistics; Performing Arts: Theatre; Pferfoming Arts: Music 
Theatre; Physics; Political Science; Spanish Studies, or 
Sociology. 

• An overall grade point average of 2 .70 with 3 .00 or hi^er in 
their primary major 

• All students must complete the Praxis n Exam prior to 
graduation. 

Course Requirements 

• EDU-305/EDU-205G Schools and Society 4: 2 (3) 

• EDU-320 Psychology of Education (3) 

• EDU-321 FieldExperience:ObservationandAnalysis(l) 
Note: EDU-205, EDU-320, andEDU-321 must be taken priorto 
application for admission to the Teacher Education Program. 

• EDU-362 Classroom Management (3) 

• EDU-492 Service Learning in Teacher Education ( 1 ) 

• EDU-499 Student Teaching (12) 

• I33U-520 Reading, Writing and Literature across the 

Curriculum (3) 

• EDU-522 Principles ofEflfective Nfethods and hstnxtion (3) 

• HDU-540 Nfethods andMataialsin Secondary Education (3) 
(or other mettiods courses offired by aits and sciox^es 
departments and approved by the SETH advisor) 

• EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) or 
EDU-545 Overview of all Exceptionahties: The Arts in 
^jecial Education (3) 



• EDU-xxx elective (2-3) as approved by SETH advisor 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Plwgram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the rrajor To do 
so, students complete 12hoursof advanced-level Honors work 
in the school and, upon the school's recommeiKiation, graduate 
with University Honors in the najor The school's Honors coor- 
dinator advises students in the Llniversity Honors Program re- 
garding school options. 

Minor in Education Studies 

• 21 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• EDU-205/EDU-205G Schools and Society 4: 2 (3) 

• EDU-320 Psychology of Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours irom the following 
EDU-285/EDU-285G Education for tatemational 

Development 3:2 (3) 
EDU-31 9 Children's literature: Multicultural and 

International Apfroaches (3) 
PSYC-300 Memory and Cognition (3) 

• 9 credit hours from the following 
ANTH-544 Topics in Public Antoopology 

Anthropology of Education (3) 
EDU-490 hidepaidenl Study Project in Education (1-6) 

(permission of the SOE advisor required) 
EDU-491 Intem^p in Educaticm (3-9) (permission of the 

SETH advisor required) 
EDU-51 9 The Uses ofTechnology in Education (3) 
H3U-541 Foundations of Special Education for Exceptional 

Children (3) or 
EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities The Arts in 

^]ecial Education (3) 
TESL-522 Language Acquisition (3) 
TESL-528 Bilingual Education (3) 

Other courses may be substituted with permiasion of the 
SETH advisor 

Minor in Special Education 

• IScredithours with grades ofC or better and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to ftie minor 

Course Requirements 

• EDU-205/EDU-205G Schools anl Society 4: 2 (3) 

• EDU-320 Psychology of Education (3) 

• EDU-490 Ii*lepaident Study in Education (1-6) or 
EDU-491 IiiemAip in Education (3-9) 

• EDU-502 Methods ofManaging Pupils wifti Behavior 

Disorders (3) 

• EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) or 



1 18 College of Arts and Sciaices 



EDU-545 Overview of all Exceptionalities: The Arts in 
Special Education (3) 
Otha: courses may be substituted with permission of flie 
SETH advisor. 

Accelerated Bachelor's Degree and 
Master's in Education Program 

Students receive a B.A. or a B.S. in a bachelor's degree 
program and the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) or the 
MA. in Special Education: Learning Disabilities. 

Admission to the Program 

Students should apply to the master's program in the sec- 
ond semesterof their junior year. Applicants must have a grade 
poiat average of 3.00 or higher in major and minor couises and 
most satisfactorily complete the following; 

• EDU-541 Foundations of Special Edjcatjon for 

Exceptional Children (3 ) 
or 
EDU-545 Overview of AU Exceptionalities: The Aits in 

Special Education (3) 

• EDU-521 Foundations ofEducation (3) (for the MAT) 
or 

EDU-502 Methods of Managing Pi^jils with Behavior 
Disorders (3) (for the MA in Social Education: 
Learning Disabilities) 

Requirements 

• All requirements forthe B.A. orB.S. inthestudent'smajor 
Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit homs from 
EDU-502 or EDU-521 , and EDU-541 or EDU-545 to satisfy 
the requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A.T. or MA. in Special 
Education Learning Disabilities 

M.A. in International Training and 
Education 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting university requirements for graduate 
study, preference is given to appUcants who have a minimum 
of six months intercultural and/or intemational experience as 
eittier a student or professional. AppUcants must eam a satis- 
factory score on the Qraduate Record Examination (ORE). 
Applicants are also required to submit two letters of recom- 
mendation tkmi persons able to evaluate the applicant's poten- 
tial for graduate study in intemational training and education 
and their intercultural experience. Apfiicants in foreign coun- 
tries who are unaUe to take the ORE should contact the School 
ofEducation, Teachingand Health prior to applying foradmis- 
sion to make alternative arrangements. All students whose first 
language is not English are required to take ttie Test of English 
as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 



Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work including 1 8 aedit 
hours of core courses, 15 credit hours in an area of 
concentration, and 3 credit hours of research methodology 
Students with extensive volunteer experiaice in development 
and training oiganistions such as ttie Peace Corps, VISL\, 
Americorp, etc., can eam up to 6 aedit houis toward tiietr 
degree. Students will be charged tuition forthese credit hours. 

• Cortprehensive examination requirement is satisfied by 
sucoessfiilconpletionofEDU-685 Proseminar International 
Training and Education. 

Course Requirements 
Core (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-61 1 Formative Ideas of Conterrporary Education (3) 

• EDU-620 Theories ofEducaticmalPsydiology and Human 

Developnsnt (3) 

• EDU-642 Training Ptogram Design (3) 

• EDU-648 Education and Devetopment Sector Analysis (3) 
or 

EDU-647 Global ani Multicuttural Education (3) 

• EDU-649 Nonformal Esducation and Development (3) 

• EDU-685 Proseminar International Training and 

Education (3) 
Social Science Research Methodology Requirement 

• EDU-61 Methods of Inquiry: Utilizing Information 

Effectively (2) 

• EDU-621 Topics in Social Science Research (1) 

Another ^aduate research methods course maybe substituted 
with approval of the SETH dean 
Area of Concentration (IS credit hours) 

• 1 5 credit hours in one of the following areas or in an 
individually-designed program, in consultation with an 
advisor 

International and Community Development 
Education 

ANTH-543 Anthropology of Development (3) 
EDU-61 2 Equity and Educational Opportunity in 

International Perspectives (3) 
EDU-631 Fundamentals of Management in Educational 

Organizations (3) 
EDU-640 Rotating Topics in Adult and Experientia] 

Education (3) 
EDU-693 Personnel and ftogram Evaluation (3) 
EDU-792 In-Service Training Project (3-9) 
SIS-633 Selected Topics in Intemational 

Communication (1-3) 
SIS-636 Micropolitics ofDevelopment (3) 
SIS-637 Intemational Development (3) 
SIS-638 Selected Topics in Intonational Devebpmrait 

Skil]s(l) 



School of Educatbn, Teaching and Health 1 1 9 



SIS-639 Selected Topics in International Conflict 

Resolution Skills (1-3) 
SIS-648 Wiman and Devebpment (3) 
SOCY-515 Models of Societal Development (3) 
SOCY-665 Economic Developnsnt and Social Change (3) 
Global and Intercultural Education 
HDU-583 Curriculum Construction and Program Design (3) 
EDU-61 2 Equity and Educational Opportunity in 

International Perspectives (3) 
EDU-640 Rotating Topics in Adult and Experieirtial 

Education (3) 
EDU-71 3 Advanced Training Program Design (3) 
EDU-792 In^ervice Training Project (3-9) 
SIS-633 Selected Topics in International 

Comnimication (1-3) 
SIS-638 Selected Topics in International Develqjment 

SSdlls(l) 
SIS-639 Selected Topics in International Conflict 

Resolution Skills (13) 
SIS-642 Cross-Cultural Communication(3) 
SIS-648 Woman and Devebpmait (3) 
SOC Y-5 1 5 Social Advocacy and Social Change (3) 
SOCY-635 Race, Gender, and Social Justice (3) 
SOCY-650 Stratificatian: Race and Ethnicity (3) 

M.A. in Special Education: Learning 
Disabilities 

Adimission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requiremaits 
for graduate study, appUcantsmust eama satisfactory score on 
the Graduate Record General Examination. To be admitted stu- 
dents must earn a passing score on the PRAXIS I: 
Pie J>rofessioiBl Skills Test (PPST) as set by the District of Co- 
Inrriria. 

Degree RequiremeDts 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work 

Option to waive course woik; Students witti the appropriate 
jrior study or professional experience in the field of education 
may be perrritted to waive qp to 6 credit hours o f course woik 
without repiacement. The waiving of credit hours and the 
^cific courses to be waived are determined and ^)proved by 
the advisor and the SETH dean iqwn admission to a master 's 
program. In addition, one of the following may be required 
an assessment provided by an educational institution or 
organization which has criteria and evaluation procedures 
approwd by the School of Education, Teaching and Health; 
or a portfolio developed in a one-credit independent study 
offered by SETH and submitted for evaluation and ^iproval 
to the advisor and SETH dean. 

• Conqnehensive examjnatioa 

• All students must complete the Praxis n Exam prior to 
graduation. 



Course Requirements 

• EDU-502 Methods ofManaging Pupils wifli Behavior 

Disorders (3) 

• EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities The Arts in 

Special Education (3) or 
EDlJ-541 Foundationsof Special Education for 
Exceptional Children (3) 

• EDU-605 Methods of ftyclweducational Assessment fcr 

Ijeaming Disabilities anl Emotional Disturbance (3) 

• IDU-606 Theories and Methods of Diagnostic and 

Remedial Mathematics (3) 

• EDU-607 Research Seminar in Special Education (3) 

• EDU-620 Theories of Educational Ps>chology and Human 
Development (3) (or an elective ^)proved by the student 's 
advisor) 

• EDU-644 Language Development and Remediation (3) 

• EDU-645 Learning Disabilities 1(3) 

• EDU-646 Learning Disabilities n (3) 

• EDU-671 Foundations of Reading: Diagnosis and 

Remediation (3) 

• EDU-792 hi-Service Training Project (6) 

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) 

The Master of Arts in Teaching is designed Sjt the student 
with no previous backgroimd or preparation in education who 
wishes to acquire teaching certification in elementary or second- 
ary education, or English for speateis of oflier languages. Stu- 
dents intaested in international training and development may 
seek secondary certification in an appropriate content area 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum universityrequirements 
for graduate study, j^jphcants must eama satisfactory score on 
the Graduate Record GerKial Examination. To be admitted stu- 
dents must earn a passing score on the PRAXIS I: 
PreJ>rofessional Skills Test (PPST) as sd by the District of Co- 
lumbia. 

For secondary education certification, students must have a 
bachelor's degree or 33 credit hours in the subject area they are 
seeking licensure, such as biology, chemistry, dance, Enghsh, 
French, German, mathematics, physics, social studies, Spanish, 
or theatre. 

Students seeking certification in Englidi for speakers of 
other languages must be profident in En^sh. It is stron^y rec- 
ommended that native speakers of En^sh have some back- 
ground in at least one other language. Intemational students are 
exp)ected to dononstrate conpetence equivalent to a score of 
600 or better on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TCEFL) in order to be endorsed for certification. 
Degree Requirements 
• 39 credit hours of apiproved graduate work, irnluding 33 

hours of course work and 6 hours of student teaching witti 

required seminar. 



120 College of Arts and Sciences 



Students' undergraduate transcripts will be evaluated 
individually; based on fliis evaluation, students may be 
required to take additional couise work to meet certification 
requiremaits. 

Option to waive course work. Students with the appropriate 
prior study or professional experience in the field of 
education may be permitted to waive up to 6 credit hours of 
couise woric without replacement. The waiving of credit 
horns and the specific courses to be waived are determined 
and approved by the advisor and tiie SETH dean upon 
admission to a master's program. In addition, one of the 
following may be required an assessment provided by an 
educational institution or organization which has criteria and 
evaluation procedures approved by the Sdiool ofEducation, 
Teadiingand Health, or a port foUo developed in a one-credit 
independent study o fibred by SETH and submitted fin- 
evaluation and approval to the advisor and SETH dean. 

• Comprehensive exanination 

• Students submit an electronic professional portfolio 

• Completion of the Praxis n Exam prior to graduation 

Course Requirements 

All course woik must be approved by the director of the 
M. A.T program. Evaluation of field performance may involve 
videotaping of classroom teaching. 

Core (9 credit hours) 

• EDU-521 Foundations ofEducation (3) 

• EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) 
or 
EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in 

Special Education (3) 

• EDU-620 Theories of Educaticmal Psychology and 

Human Development (3) 

Student Teaching (6 credit hours) 

• EDU-699 Student Teaching with required seminar (6) 

Ekmentary Education (24 credit hours) 

• EDU-51 9 Uses of Technology in Education (3) 

• EDU-601 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School (3) 

• EDU-602 Teadung Language Arts in the Elementary 

School (3) 

• EDU-603 Teaching Mathematics in the Elemaitaiy 

School (3) 

• EDU-604 Teadung Science in the Elementary School (3) 

• EDU-608 Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary 

School (3) 

• EDU-609 Effective Teadnng for Diverse Learners (3) 

• EDU-61 9 Children's Literature; Multicultural and 

International y^jproaches (3) 



Secondary Education (24 credit hours) 

• EDU-520Reading, Writing, and Literature across the 

Curriculum (3) 

• EDU-522 Principles ofEfifective Methads aid fastmction (3) 

• EDU-540 Methods and MEteriab in Secondaiy Education (3) (or 
otiier approved methods courses) 

• EDU-662 Classroom Management (3) 

• Four elective courses (12 credit hours), normally with half 
t^en in he academic discipline of the designated teaching 
area, and the other courses taken within the School of 
Education, Teaching and Healtti. 

English for Speakers of Other Languages 
(24 credit hours) 

• TEa.-500 Principles of Linguistics (3) 

• TESL-501 En^ish Language Teaching I (3) 

• TESL-502 F.n glish Language Teaching 11 (3) 

• TESL-503Shucture of English (3) 

• TE3^-523 Second Language Acquisition (3) 

• TESL-524 Reading and \Miting in flieESL/EFL 

Classroom (3) 

• TEa.-527 Cultural Issues in ttoESL/EFLQasaoom (3) 

• TESL-53 1 Language Assessmrait (3) 

International IVaining and Development 
(24 credit hours) 

• EDU-520 Reading, Writing, and Literature across the 

Curriculum (3) 

• EDU-522 PrinqplesofEffectiveMetlBds and hislnictiDn (3) 

• EDU-540 Methods and Materials in Secondaiy Bducjtion (3) 

• EDU-642 Training Program Design (3) 

• EDU-647 Global aolMulticulhiral Education (3) 

• EDU-662 Classroom Management (3) 

• SIS-637 International Development (3) 

• SIS-642 Cross-Cultural Comnunication (3) 

Ongoing Assessment of Academic and Professional 
Performance 

Students must be admitted to the M.A-T. program before en- 
rolling in methods courses (EDU-60 1-609, EDU-522/ 
EDU-540, or TESL-50 1/502). To enroll in EDU-699 Student 
Teaching, students must receive a positive evaluation fiom the 
Teacher Education Committee based on establiAed aiteria, a 
grade of B- or better in EDU-52 1 Foundations ofEducation and 
EDU-620 Theories of Educational Psycho kigy and Human De- 
velopment, and grades of B or better in methods courses. Stu- 
dents rrust also earn a passing score (as set by the District of 
Columbia teacher licensing agency) on the PRAXIS I: 
Pie-Professwnal Skills Test (PPST). 



Sdiool of I^ducation, Teaching and Health 121 



Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) and 
M.A. in International Peace and Conflict 
Resolution 

Graduates receive an M.A in International Peace and Con- 
flict Resdution from the School of International Service and the 
MAT in secondary educatioD from ttie School of Education, 
Teaching and HealttL 
Admission to the Program 

ApplicaiAs must hold an accredited bachelor's degree wifli a 
cunulative grade point average of at least a B+ (3.30 orhigha" 
on a 4.00 scale) and should have had at least 24 credit hcurs of 
social science course woik relevant to international studies. Stu- 
dents who do not rrcet these minimim lequirements, if other- 
wise admissiWe, are assigned additional course woric specified 
at the tinE of admissioiL 

Students must apply to both the School of Tntonational Ser- 
vice (SIS) and the School of Education, Teaching and Healfli 
(SETH) in the College of Arts and Sciences. Admission to ei- 
ther of the participating teaching units in no way inpUes admis- 
sion to the ottier unit. For more information on admissions 
requirements, contact the SIS Graduate Admissions Office at 
202-885-1646 or the SETH Teacher Education Office at 
202-885-3720. 

All applicants are required to submit results of fee aptitude 
section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Interna- 
tional applicants whose first language is not EngUsh are re- 
quired to submit results of the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) The minimum TOEFL score for full con- 
sideration is 600. All applicants must submit two letters ofrefer- 
ence evaluating undergraduate academic performance and 
suitability for graduate study in intonational affairs and educa- 
tion 

For secondary education certification, students must have a 
bachelor's degree or 33 credit hours in the subject area they are 
seeking licensure, it is anticipated feat studeits who conplete 
the M.A in International Peace and Conflict Resoluticn will 
have sufficient background to meet certification requirements 
in social studies. However, students who meet requirements for 
other subject areas will also be considered. Students will be no- 
tified at fee time of admission concerning additional course 
wodc required for state certification 
Degree Requirements 

• 57 credit hours of approved graduate coiise work wife a 
cumulative grade point average of 3.00 
Students must conplete fee 9 credit hours in ttie education core 
courses, 1 2 credit hours in secondary education, 6credi hous 
of student teaching, and at least 1 2 of the 1 5 oedit hours inpeaoe 
and conflict resolution to receive fee MAT. 
Students must complete 1 5 oedit hours in peace and confhct 
resolution, 3 credit hours in economics, 6 credit hours in 
mBthodology, 6 credit hours in researchand writing, and the 9 
aedit hours in fee education cere to receive fee MA. in 
International Peace and Conflict Resolution. 



In addition to intensive course woric and student teaching 
placements, students are also required to partidpate in an 
educational internship program. These field placements are 
carefully supervised and coordinated to meet state 
certification requirements 

• ftoficiencyin amodem foreign language 

• Comprehensive examinatian in international peace and 
ccmflict resduticm 

• Comprehensive examination for M.A.T. 
Course Requirements 

Education Core (9 credit hours) 

• BDU-521 Foundations of Education (3) 

• EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) or 
EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionahties: The Arts in 
^>ecial Education (3) 

• EDU-620 Theories of Educational Psjchotogy and 

Human Development (3) 
Secondary Education Tk-ack (12 credit hours) 

• EDU-520 Reading, Writing and Literature across the 

Curriculum (3) 

• EDU-522 Principles ofEflfective Methods and 

Instriiction Q) 

• EDU-540 Mefeods and Materials in Secondary 

Education (3) (or ofeer approved mefeods courses) 

• EDU-662 Qassroom Management (3) 

Student Teaching (6 credit hours) 

• EDU-699 Student Teaching (6) 

Peace and Conflict Resolution (15 credit hours) 

• SIS-605 Theory of Cooperative Oobal Politics (3) 

• SIS-607 Peace Paradigms (3) 

• SIS-609 Conflict Analysis and ResolutioiL Theoiy 

and Practice (3) 

• SlS-610 Theory of Conflict, Violence and V^ (3) 

• SlS-611 International Negotiation (3) 

Economics (3 credit hours) 

• BCON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 

Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SlS-600 Quantitative Analyas in htemational Afl&irs (3) 

• SIS-612Researdi Seminar in Peace and Conflict 

Resolution (3) or 
ofeer ^iproved nsfeods course 
Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-691 Internship (3) 

• SIS-795 Master's Research Requiremait (3) (subetantial 

research paper (SRP) 



122 College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Certificate in Teaching 

This teacher certification program is designed for students 
with bachelor's degrees in the arts, scimces, or humanities and 
several yeais of responsible woric experience. Students con> 
ptete the program and mist pass certification (licensure) in the 
District of Columbia and through such certification are eligible 
for recprocal certification in over 40 states. Some states may 
require additional courses orexaminations. The catificate pro- 
gram may be taken in elementary, secondary, or EngUsh ft>r 
Speakers of Other Language (ESOL) teaching. 
Admission to the Program 

y^jpUcations must include transcripts of aU college woik, 
AARTS transcripts or equivalent, a currulative grade point av- 
erage of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) in ttie last 60 credit hoias of un- 
dergraduate woik and in all graduate woik, a statenent of 
purpose, and two letters of recoirmendations. Admission to 
the certificate program constitutes admission to the Teacher 
Education Program. To be admitted students must earn a pass- 
ing score on the PRAXIS 1; Pre-Professional Skills Test 
(PPST) as set by the District of Columbia. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 24—30 credit hours of approved graduate woik, including 6 
credit hotjrs of student teaching with grades of C or better, 
and at least 9-12 credit hours at the 600-level or above 
For secondary certification, specific course woik in the 
subject area to be taught may be needed to meet 
requiremaits for certification 

• Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted towaid the fiilfiUment of certificate requirements, 
although ttiese grades will be included in the calculation of 
the GPA. Students mist have atleastaS.OGPAincotificale 
couises in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate pno grams must take a minimumof 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-mDntti period and coiTf)lete the certificate in 
four years. International students mist enroll in 9 credit 
houis each semester (except for sumner). A maxiniim of 6 
credit hours earned at an accredited college or university 
may be qiphed toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

• Students submit an electronic professional portfolio and 
con^dete flie PRAXIS H exam paior to being awaided 4ie 
certificate. 

Course Requirements 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• EDU-521FouaiationsofEducation(3) 

• EDU-620 Theories ofEducationalRychology and 

Human Development (3) 

• EDU-699 Student Teaching (6) 

Elementary (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-601 Teaching Reading in the Elemaitary School (3) 

• EDU-602 Teaching Language Arts in the Eilementary 

School (3) 



• EDU-603 Teadiing Mathematics in the Elementary 

School (3) 

• EDU-604 Teaching Science in the Hemmtary Sdiool (3) 

• EDU-608 Teaching Social Studies in the Elementaiy 

School (3) 

• EDU-<i09 Effective Teeiching fijr Diverse Learners (3) 

Secondary Education (12 credit hours) 

• EDU-520 Reading, Writing, and Literature across the 

Curriculum (3) 

• EDU-522PrindplesofEfifectiveMetk)dsandtaanictiDn(3) 

• EDU-540 Methods and Materials in Secon(biy Education (3) (or 
ottierapjproved methods courses) 

• EDU-662 Classroom Management (3) 

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) 
(15 credit hours) 

• TESL-500 Principles of Linguistics (3) 

• TESL-501 English Language Teaching I (3) 

• TESL-523 Second Language Acquisition (3) 
cr 

TESL-527 Cultural Issues in tte ESL/EFL Clasawom (3) 

• TESL-524 Reading and Witing in ftie ESL/EFL 

Cla^noom(3) 

• TESL-531 Language Assessment (3) 

Ongoing Assessment of Acadonic and Professional 
Performance 

To remain in the Teacher Education Program, certificate stu- 
dents mist maintain a cumulative grade pioint average of 3.00; 
receive satisfectoiy evaluations in field and methods placements; 
obtain a satisfactory evaluation fixam the Teacher Education 
Committee based ujx)n academic, pirofessional, and peiformance 
criteria established by the committee; and meet specific course 
gtade requirements. Students must also earn a passing score (as 
set by the District of Columbia teacher Ucensing agency) on the 
PRAXIS I: Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST). 
Admission to the M A.T. 

Students in ftie certificate program seddng admKsion to the 
M.A.T. degree program wiU be conadered after satisfactory 
compldion of up to 18 credit houis of course woit Amaximim 
o f 2 1 credit hours earned in nondegree status in a completed cer- 
tificate pjrogram may be appiied to a graduate degree program 

Master of Education in Curriculum and 
Instruction 

The Master of Education (MEd.) in Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion is designed for students with a background in educational 
theory and practice. The program follows the National Council 
for ttie Accreditation ofTeacher Education (NCATE) guidelines 
for advanced pjro grams and provides an opjpxjrtunity for students 
to earn National Board for flie Professional Teaching Standards 
(NBPTS) certification. Students select a focus within the pro- 
gram including literacy, global literacy, educational leader^p. 



Sdiool of Education, Teaching and Health 1 23 



and educational technology. The literacy focus prepares prac- 
ticing teachers to become literacy specialists by providing a 
thoiDugh grounding in theory, jHindples, and practices of liter- 
acy education as wen as a critical understanding of key contem- 
porary issues n relation ti the teaching and learning of literacy 
and language. Global htaacy provides practicing teachers the 
opportunity to incorporate glotel perspectives on Uteracy teach- 
ing and learning iito their existing curricula and pedagogies, 
nducatiooal leaderdiip prepares teacheis to develop effective 
professional development prograrrK, provide mentoring and in- 
strut^on for new teauheis, and develop assessment and evalua- 
tion programs for schools and other educational organizations. 
The technology focus with specializations in mathematics or 
science is designed for teacher leaders with particular interest in 
integrating technology into the curiculum, specifically how 
mail and science instruction is presented in schools and other 
educational oiganizations. 

Admission to the Program 

In EKlditicn to meeting the minimum university requiremoits 
for graduate study, appUcants must earn a satisfactory score on 
the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The GRE is required 
for applicants whose hi^est earned degree is a baccalaureate 
and for studerts who have completed a master's degree wifli 
less than a 3.5 GR\ and may be required for those with mas- 
ter's degrees and GPAs above 3.5. Apjiicanls should have at 
least three years of teaching experience and a standad teaching 
lic«ise, although afpUcants whose teaching experience oc- 
curred more than ten years ago are encouraged to apply. 

Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work 

L^ to 6 credit hours may be transferred from woik conpleted 
at other institutioiis and approved by fte program director at 
time of admission 

• Aprogramofstudy approved by ftieprogramdirector and the 
dean of the school must be subrtitted by the end of the first 
semester of enroHmeiS in the program 

• Comprehensive exaninaticin requirement satisfied throu^ 
q)ecified course work: 3 credit hours of EDU-629 or 
EDU-691 

Course Requirements 
Core 

• HDU-525 Principles of EdiKaticmal Assessment and 
Evaluation (3) 

• HDU-a)9 Effective Teaching forDivase Leamws (3) 

• HDU-683 Curriculum Design forthe ClassiDom(3) 

• I33U-687 Analyas of Instruction and Supervision (3) 

Comprehensive Examination (3 credit hours) 

• HDU-629 National Board for Professional Teaching 
Standards Preparation (1 ) (ftir a total of three credits) 
or 

EDU-691 Ittero^iip (3) in an area of focus 



Social Science Methodology (3 credit hours) 

• HI)U-610 Methods of Inquiry; Utilizing Information 

Effectively (2) 

• EDU-621 Topics in Social Science Research (1) 

Area of focus (18 credit hours) 
Literacy (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-61 9 Childrai's Literature: A Criticalliteracy 

Approach (3) 

• EDU-622 Language aud Literacy Learning (3) 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 

• EDU-6t4 Language Development and Remediation (3) 
or 

EDU-671 Foundations of Reading; Diagnosis and 
Remediation (3) 

• 6 credit hours fixxn ttie following 
ANTH-537 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
ANTH-635 Race, Genler and Social Justice (3) 
ANTH-637 Discourse, Narrative, and Text (3) 
EDU-565 Gender and Cultural Diversity in School (3) 
EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 
EDU-644 Language Developmait and Remedialion (3) 
or 

HDU-671 Foundations of Reading: Diagnosis and 

Remediation (3) 
EDU-647 Global and Multicultural Education (3) 
SOCY-553 Multiculturalism(3) 

TESL-527 Cultural Issues in the ESI7EFLaassroom(3) 
Global Literacy (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-622 Language and Literacy Learning (3) 

• H)U-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 

• EDU-624 Language, SchooKng, and hfation-Building (3) 

• EDU-647 Global and MuhJculturalEdKatbn (3) 

• 6 credit hoirs fitm the following 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
EDU-627 Literacy Education Skills InstitulBs (1) 
EDU-792 In-Service liaining Project: Internship in 

Education (3-9) 
SIS-546 Race, Eflmicity and Cultural Identity (3) 
SOCY-553 Multiculturalism(3) 
Educational Leadership (18 credit hours) 

• H3U-631 Fundamentals of Management in Educational 

Organizations (3) 

• EDU-632 Case Studies in Educational Management (3) 

• EDU-633 Financing Educational Systems (3) 

• EDU-634 Education and Public Ibhcy (3) 

• EDU-639 Effective Leaderdiip9dlls (3) 
EDU-666 Legal Issues in Education (3) 

Educational Technology (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-51 9 The Uses ofTechnology in Education (3) 



124 College of Arts and Sciences 



• EDU-560 Advanced Technology in Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours from ttie following: 
COMM-652 Web Studio (3) 

CSC-5 1 Legal Issues in Computing (3) 
CSC-535 User hiterfece Analyas aai Design (3) 
CSC-589 Topics in Counter Science (3) 

• 6 credit hours from fee following: 
BIO-550 Developmental Biology (3) and 

BIO-55 1 Devebpmental Biology Laboratory (1 ) 
CSC-589 Topics in Computer Science (3) 
EDU-603 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary 

School (3) 
EDU-604 Teaching Science in the Hemaitary School (3) 
EDU-606 Theories and Methods in Diagnostic and 

Prescriptive Mathematics (3) 
ENVS-580 Environmental Science I: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 
MArH-580 Topics in Msthematics (3) 
MArH-585 Mathematics Education (3) 
Science content area elective 

Graduate Certitifcate in Curriculum and 
Instruction 

The curriculum and instmction certificate [rogram is de- 
signed for students with an interest in expanding their teaching 
or supervision skills, but who are i»t currently puisuing a mas- 
ter's degree. Students select a focus including Uteracy, global 
literacy, educational leadership, and educational technology. 
Admission to the Program 

Apphcations must include transcripts of all undergraduate 
and graduate course work, a cumulative grade point average of 
3.00 (ona 4.00 scale) in the last 60 credit hours ofundergradu- 
ate woik and in all graduate work, a statement of purpose, and 
two letters of recommendation. 
Certificate Requirements 

• ISciedithouTsofapprovedgraduateworkwittigradesofB- 
or better, and at least 9 credit hours at the 600-lewl orabo ve 
Grades below B- in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fulfillment of certificate recpiiremerJs, 
although fliese grades wiD be included in ttie calculation of 
the GPA. Students imst have at least a 3 .0 GPAin certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate pro grams must take a minimumof 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-monfli period and conplete the certificate in 
four years. International students imst enroll in 9 credit 
horns each semester (except for surrmer). A rrBxirtum of 6 
credit hours earned at an accredited college or university 
may be applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 
Literacy (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-61 9 Children's Literature: A Critical Literacy 

Approach (3) 



• EDU-622 Language and literacy Learning (3) 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 

• EDU-644 Language Devdopment and Remediation (3) 
or 

EDU-671 FoundatiaDSofReading: Diagnosis and 
Remediation (3) 

• 6 credit hours from ttie following: 

ANTH-5 37 Tofrics in Language and Culture (3) 

ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 

ANTH-637 Discourse, Narrative, and Text (3) 

EDU-565 Gender and Cultural Diversity in Sdiool (3) 

EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 

EDU-644 Language Development and Remediation (3) 

or 

EDU-671 Foundations ofReading: Diagnosis and 

Remediation (3) 
EDU-647 Global and Multicultural Education (3) 
SOCY-553 Multiculturalism(3) 

TEaL-527 Cultural Issues in tte ESL/EFL Qasaoom (3) 
Global Literacy (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-622 Language and Literacy Learning (3) 

• EDU-623 Topics in Literacy Education (3) 

• EDU-624 Language, Schoohng, and Nation-Building (3) 

• EDU-647 Global aai Multicultural Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours fixsm the following: 
ANTH-635 Race, Gender and Social Justice (3) 
EDU-627 Literacy Education Skills histitutes (1) 
EDU-792 In-Service Training Project: Internship in 

Education (3-9) 
SIS-546 Race, Ethmcity and Cultural Identity (3) 
SOCY-553 Multiculturalism (3) 
Educational Leadership (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-63 1 Fundamentals of Managanent in Educatbnal 

Organizations (3) 

• EDU-632 Case Studies in Educational Management (3) 

• EDU-633 Financing Educational Systems (3) 

• EDU-634 Education and Public Policy (3) 

• EDU-639Efiective Leadership Skills (3) 
EDU-666 Legal Issues in Education (3) 

Educational Technology (18 credit hours) 

• EDU-519The Uses of Technology in EdiKation (3) 

• EDU-560 Advanced Technology in Education (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
COMM-652 Web Studio (3) 

CSC-5 1 Legal Issues in Confuting (3) 
CSC-535 Userlnterfece Analysis and Design (3) 
CSC-589 Topics in Conqjuter Science (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
BIO-550 Developmental Biology (3) and 

BIO-55 1 Devebptnental Biology Laboratory (1) 



School of Educatbn, Teaching and Health 1 25 



CSC -589 Topics in Computer Science (3) 
EDU-603 Teachiig Mathematics in the Kkmenlary 

School (3) 
EDU-604 Teachiig Science in the Elanentary School (3) 
IDU-606 Theories and Methods in Diagnostic and 

FVescriptive Mathematics (3) 
ENVS-580 luivironmental Science I: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 
MATH-5 80 Topics in Mathematics (3) 
MATH-585 Mattematics Education (3) 
Science content area elective 

B.S. in Health Promotion 

The B.S. in Health Promotion provides rigorous academic 
preparation in scientific and clinical knowledge of exercise 
physiology, human physiological chemistry, programming, 
health psychology, and nutrition, as weU as organizational/hu- 
man resource management . The program includes course wodc 
liomthe Departments of Biology, Oiemistry, Psychology, and 
the Kogod School of Business. Experiential learning opportuni- 
ties are available at federal government agendes and many or- 
ganizations dealing with healt, education, nsnaged care, and 
physical fitnes to meet the intemship/cooperalive education re- 
quirement of flie jMOgram. This curriculum prepares students 
for a health promotion position in a corporate, corrarunity, 
commerdal, or school environmeii, or for graduate work in 
health-related fie Ida 
Admission to the Program 

FomBl admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
ageof2.70 (ona4.00 scale) after the frediman year and depart- 
mental approval. In addition to the univasity requirements for 
transfer admission, applicants should have maintained a mini- 
mum grade point average of 2.70 (on a 4.00 scale). Students 
with a grade point average between 2.50 and 2.70 may be for- 
mally admitted to the m^or after completion of 1 5 credit hours 
with a minimum grade point average of 3.00. 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college rtBthematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotalof ten courses, consisting of one foundationcouise and 
one second4evel course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 58 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• BIO-200/BIO-200G Structure and Function of tte 

Human Body 5:2(3) 



• CHEM-1 00/CHEM-lOOG The Molecular Vfcrld 5 : 1 (4) 

• CHEM-506Human Physiological Chemistry (3) 

• HFrr-200 lifetime Health and Fitness (3) 

• HFrr-205/HFIT-205GCuirait Concepts in NutritJon 5:2 (3) 

• HFrr-240 Introduction to Health Promotion (3) 

• HFTr-245/HFrr-245G Gender, Culture, and Healtti 42 (3) 

• HFIT-250 Strategies in Stress Reduction (3) 

• HFrr-325 Exercise Physiotogy (3) 

• HFIT-33 5 Health Promotion Program Planning (3) 

• HFIT-410 Health Promotion Evaluation (3) 

• HFrr-488 Senior Seminar (3) 

• HFIT-491 IntemAip in Health Promotion (6) or 

HFrr-392 Cooperative Education FieU Experience (6) 

• HFn-540 Health Conmunication (3) 

• Hm-565 Quantitative Assessment (3) 

• MGMT-353 Principles of Organizational Theory, 

Behavior and Managonent (3) 

• PSYC-105/PSYC-105GPsychobgy;Understandmg 

Fiiman Behavior 4: 1 (3) 

• PSYC-333 Healfc Psychology (3) 

Minor in Health Promotion 

• 24credithours with grades ofC or better and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to ttie minor 

Course Requirements 

• HFrr-205/HFIT-205GCunait Concepts in Nutrition 5:2 (3) 

• HFIT-200 Lifetime Health and Fitness (3) 

• HFIT-240 falroduction to Health Promotion (3) 

• HFrr-325 Exercise Physiobgy (3) 

• HFrr-335 Health Promotion Program Planning (3) 

• 9 credit hours fiom the following, approved by a department 
advisor 

HFrr-250 Strategies in Stress Reduction (3) 
HFIT-270 First Aid, CPR and Medical Emergencies (3) 
HFIT-323 Issues in Women's Health (3) 
HFTr-410 Health Promotion Evaluation (3) 
HFIT-540 Health Conmunicatiai (3) 
HHl-565 Quantitative Asaessmait (3) 

Combined B.S. in Health Promotion and 
M.S. in Health Promotion Management 

This program allows qualified students to earn both a B.S. in 
Health Promotion and an MS. in HeaWi Promotion Managemert. 
Admission to the Program 

Undergraduates whose overall grade point average is 3.00 or 
hitler wiU be considered for ttie combined program Students 
should discuss their interest in the program with the academic 
advisor fiw the B.S. in Health Promotion program before sub- 
mitting a formal £^)pUcation and apjiy for admission to the M.S. 



126 College of Arts and Sciences 

in Health Promotion Management program before the fall se- 
mester of their senior >ear. 
Course Requirements 

• AH requirements for the B.S. in Health Promrtion 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Health Promotion 
Management, including a rrnnimum of 24 credit hours 
completed in residence in graduate status after the 
undergraduate degree has been awarded. 

CHEM-506 Human Physiological Chemistry, HFIT-540 
Health CorrmunBation, and HFrr-565 Quantitative Asseas- 
msnt may be usedto satisty the requirementsofboth degrees. 

M.S. in Health Promotion Management 

The primary objective of the M.S. in Health PiDmotion 
Management is to provide a competency-based, 
rrultidisciplinary academic program for individuals dedicated 
to assuming leadaship positions within the healtti promotion 
industry. The curriculum integrates managerial skills with sci- 
entific and dinical knowledge of exercise physiology, human 
biochemistry, behavioral psychology, and lEitritioiL Students 
also select an areaof emphasis in eithercorporate health, exer- 
cise physiology, health communication, health poUcy, or 
gfobal health 
Admission to the Program 

The program is open to students with varied undergraduate 
backgrounds and has few sdence-related acadexiic prerequi- 
sites. The academic record and experience of each apphcant 
will be thoroughly reviewedby the program director. The min- 
imim univeisity requirements for admission to graduate study 
are a bachelor's degree earned at an accredited college or um- 
vasity and a 3.00 cmmlative grade point average (on a 4.00 
scale) for the last 60 credit hours of undergraduate study A sat- 
isfectory score on fee Graduate Record Eixamination (ORE) or 
the Graduate Management AdmissioiB Test (GMAT) is re- 
quired for admission. Program prerequisites include human 
anatorr^ and physiology and exercise physiology. However, 
these courses can be taken after admission to the program. In- 
ternational appUcants who are fluent in written and spoken 



Enghsh are encouraged to app\y- To be considered for admis- 
sion, apphcants rrust meet univasity requiemaits for writing 
and speaking English. 
Degree Requirements 

• 40 oedit hours of graduate work 

• Tool of research; students must corrplete the tool of research 
examination or HFrr-565 Quantitative Assessment with a 
grade of B or better 

• Theas or internship option 

• One written and one oral comprehensive examinatioo 
Course Requirements 

• HFIT-5 1 Applied Human Physiology and Testing I (4) 

• HFIT-540 Health Communication (3) 

• HFIT-545 Nutrition for Health (3) 

• HFIT-550 Programming fcr Health Promotion (3) 

• HFIT-555 Research MetlBdology (3) 

• HFn"-560HealthPromotion in Healthcare (3) 

• HFIT-565 Quanritatrve Assessment (3) 

• HFrr-61 8 Strategic Planning in Health Promotion (3) 

• HFIT-620 Critical Issues (3) 

• HFrr-682 hi-Service Training (3) or 
HFIT-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (3) 

• PSYC-570Betevioral Medicine (3) 

• 6 credit hours in one of ttie following areas of emphasis: 

Corporate 

• HFrr-575 Global Health (3) 

• MGMr-609OrganistionaIBdhaviorandHiunan 

Resource Management (3) 
Exercise Physiology 

• CHEM-506 Human Physiological Chemistiy (3) 

• HFrr-51 5 AppUed Human Physiology and Testing II (3) 

Health Communication 

• COMM-640 Public Comminication Principles (3) 

• COMM-642 Public Comnunication Management (3) 



Environmental Studies 



Director KJho Kim 



A new generation of environmental professionals is needed 
to solve the myriad environmental proHems faced by society. 
These rigorous, interdisciplinary programs provide studerfts 
with a basic imderstanding of the scientific and social pno- 
cesses that ^lape our environment. Students corrpleting the 
fgogranB will have the fimdamental knowledge and the critical 
thinking skills to make independent, rational decisions ccn- 
couing current and pressing environmental issues. 



Offered by flie Department of Biology, programs include a 
B A. in Environmental Studies, B.S. in Marine Science, minOT in 
environmental science, M.S. in Enviromnental Science, and 
Graduate Cotificate in Environmental Assessment. 

The BA. in Environmental Studies consists of a core and a 
set of related courses. The core pirovides a solid foundation based 
on the natural scieices as well as flie social sciences. The student 
then builds upon the core by choosing from an approved list of 
related courses spanning many disciplines, including courses in 
tte College of Arts and Sciences, the Sdwolof International Ser- 
vice, and the School ofPublic Afi&irs. Acarefiil choice of related 



Hnvironmental Studies 127 



couiscs, made in consultation with a faculty advisor, will allow 
the student to tailor a prugram of study suited to his or her spe- 
cific interests and professional goals. 

Each student in the program is also encoiraged to gain prac- 
tical field experience through an internsh^ at one ormore o f the 
many public and private environmental oiTganizatiotis in the 
Wadiington, DC. vicinity, such as the Environmental ftotec- 
tion Agency (EPA), Smithsonian Institution, National Oceanic 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), American Rivets, and 
Chesapeake Bay FoundatioiL 

Graduates of the program will be prepared for empJoyment 
in iBtitral resource fields dealing with basic and applied scien- 
tific interests, iTBnagement, and policymaking. A minor in envi- 
ronmental science is also available. 

The M.S. in Environmental Science emphasizes the 
multidisdplinary tutune of environmental studies \vhile retain- 
ing disciplinary strength and rigor. The diversity of course ofier- 
iags includes aivironmental toxicology, conservation biology, 
enviroinnBntal ecotxjmics, and environmental policy, witti both 
a domestic and intematiaDal scope. 

B.A. in Environmental Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Admission to the program is ftirou^ foimal declaration of 
the major through the Department of Biology. 
University Requirements 

• Atotal of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hoi¥s of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of coUege mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouises,consistingofonefoundationcouiseand 
one second4evel couree in an approved sequence fiomeach 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 70 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

Core (52 credit hours) 
Social Sciences (15 credit hours) 

• BCON-1 00/ECON-l GOG NfacioecoiBmics 4: 1 (3) 

• ECON-200/ECON-200GMicroeconc«iiics4:2(3) 

• GOVT-llO/GOVT-llOGPoUticsintte 

United States 4: 1(3) 

• SIS-105/SIS-105G Wcrld Pblitics 3;1 (3) 

• One of the following: 
ANTH-334 Environmental Justice (3) 

SOC Y-389 Sodety and the Global Environment (3) 
Environmental Studies (J 9 credit hours) 

• CHEM-330EnvironnBntalChenistiy(3) 



• I3^fVS-102SeminarinEnvironmentalIssues (1) 

• ENVS-360 Environraesit and flie Atmosphere (3) 

• ENVS-375 Water Resources (3) 

• ENVS-492 Senior Capstone in Envinnmeilal Studies (3) 

• Two fiom the following; 

BCON-379 Economics of Environmental Pblicy (3) 
GOVT-370 Formation and hnplementation of 

Environmental Policy (3) 
GOVT-423 Advanced Sadies in Public PoKcy (3): 

Conservation Politics 
SIS-337 International Developmait (3) 
SIS-338 Environment and Devetopmeot (3) 
SIS-388 International Environmental Ftohtics (3) 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics (J 8-20 credit hours) 

• BIO-1 10/BIO-l lOG General Biology I 5 1 (4) 
or 

BIO-IOO/BIO-IOOG Great Expeiimerts in Biology 5:1 (4) 

• BIO-210/BIO/210G Genetal Biology H 5:2 (4) 
or 

ENVS-250/ENVS-250G Living in the EnviromiKnt 5:2 (3) 

• CHEM-1 IQ/CHEM-l lOG Geneial Ctemisdy 1 5: 1 (4) 
or 

CHEM-1 OO'CHEM- lOOG The Molecular Wsrld 5 : 1 (4) 

• CHEM-21(yCHEM-210G General Chsmistryn 5:2 (4) 
or 

CHEM-22(VCHEM-220G Enviiwmiental Resowces and 
Energy 5:2 (3) 

• one of the following: 
MATH-211 Applied Calculus I (4) or 
MATH-221 Calculus 1(4) 

Related Course Requirements (18 credit hours) 

SkiUs (3 credit hours) 

• One ofthe following: 

COMM-200 Writing for Mass Comnunicfdon (3) 
CSC-310 lifiroductionto Geogrsphic hformatiao 
SysteiTB (3) 

Environmental Applications (12 credit hours) 

• 12 credit hours fiom the following: 

ANTH-3 34 Environmental Justice (3) (if not taken for core 

requirement) 
BIO-340 Marine Biology (3) 
BIO-342 Marine Manmals (3) 
BI0^23 hitrodut^ionto Ecology (3) 
BIO-440 Microbiology wittiLahoratcHy (4) 
BIO-562 Aquatic Field Mefliods (3) 
BIO-563 Tarestrial Field Methods (3) 
CHEM-3 1 Organic Oiemistry 1 (3) ant/ 

CHEM-3 12 Organic Chemistry ILaboratory (1) 
CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry n (3) and 

CHEM-322 Organic Chenristry II Laboratory (1) 



128 College of Arts and Sciences 



ECON-379 Economics ofEnvironmental Policy (3Xif not 

taken for core lequtiement) 
ENVS-240/ENVS-240GOceanogi^y 5;2(3) 
E^^VS-303 Environmental Issues in the Chessfjeake Bay 

(6) 
ENrVS-520 Biogeodiemistry (3) 
ENVS-572 Topics in Conservation Biology (3) 
ENVS-580 Environmental Science L A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 
ENVS-581 Envirornnental Scioice II: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 
ENVS-582 Environmental Law (3) 
GOVT-370 Formation and Imfdementation of 

Environmental Policy (3) (if not taken forcore 
requirement) 
GOVT-423 Advanced Studies in Public Ftolicy (3): 
Conservation Politics (if not taken few core 
requiremait) 
PHYS-105/PHYS-105G Collie Ftysics I 5 : 1 (4) 
or 

PHYS-1 10/PHYS-l lOG University Physics I 5: 1 (4) 
PHYS-205/PHYS-205O College Physics H 5:2 (4) 
or 

PHYS-210/PHYS-210G Univasity Physics H 5:2 (4) 
SIS-337 International Development (3) (if not taken for 

core requirement) 
SIS-338 Environment and Developntnt (3) (if not taken 

for core requiranent) 
SIS-388 International Environmental Politics (3) (if not 

taken for core requirement) 
SOCY-389 Sodety and tte Global Environmait (3) (if not 

taken for core requirement) 
STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4 ) 
Other courses may be substituted with approval of the Envi- 
ratmental Studies cocrdinator. 
Experiential Learning ( 3 credit hours) 
A maximum of 3 credit hours from; 
ENVS-392 CoojDerative Eduction Field Experience (3) 
ENVS-490 Independent Study Project (1^ 
ENVS-491 Internship (1-6) 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors work 
in the department and, upon departmental recomneodaticn, 
graduate with University Honors in fee major The depart- 
ment's Honors coordinator advises students in the University 
Honors Program regarding departmental options. 

B.S. in Marine Science 

Admision to the Program 

Admission to the program is through fomial declaration of 
the major through the Oepartinent of Biology. 



University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit houis 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of cdlege mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting ofcne foundation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence fixxneachof 
the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 70 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• BIO-llO/BIO-llOG General Biology I 5:1 (4) 

• BIO-210/BIO/210G General Biology 5:2 (4) 

• CHEM-llO/CHEM-llOGGeiKral Chenistry I 5:1 (4) 

• CHEM-210/CHEM-210GGeiBral Chemistry n 5:2 (4) 

• CHEM-401 Geology (3) 

• CSC-3 1 Introduction to Geographic Information 

Systems (3) 

• ECON-lOO/ECON-1 OOG Macroeconomics 4:1 (3) 

• ECasr-200/ECON-200G Microeconomics 4: 2 (3) 

• IiNVS-104 Issues in Marine Science 1(1) 

• ENVS-105 Issues inMarineSdencen (2) 

• ENVS-360 Environment and the Atmosphere (3) 

• ENVS-420 Applied Ooeanogr^iiy with Laboratory (4) 

• ENVS-492 Senior Capstone in Bivironmental Studies (3) 
or 

E>A'S-303 Enviromrental Issues in ttie Chesapeake Bay (6) 

• MATH-221 Cafculus 1 (4) 

• MATH-222 Calculus n (4) 
or 

STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• One of the following 

ECON-379 Economics ofEnviranmental Policy (3) 

ENVS-582 Environmental Law (3) 

SIS-388 International Environmental Pohtics (3) 

• 9 credit hours from ttie following: 
BIO-340 Marine Biology (3) 
BIO-342 Marine Mammals (3) 
BIO-423 Introduction to Ecology (3) 

BlO-520 Topics in Marine Zoology with Laboratory (4) 
ENVS-303 Environmraital Issues in ftie Chesspeake Bay (6) 
ENVS-425 Advanced Marine Ecology with Ljfcoralory (4) 

• 9 credit hours at a marine field station wifli approval fimntlie 
marine sdence fnDgram advisor 



EnviiDmnenlal Studies 129 



University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Ptogram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students complete 1 2 hours of advanoed-level Honors woric 
in the departncnt and, upon departmental recommendation, 
graduate with Uni vanity Honors in the major The department's 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honore 
Pro-am regarding departmeifial options 

Minor in Environmental Science 

Requirements 

• Aminimumof 22 credit hoirs w4h grades of C or better wifli 
at least 1 2 credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• CHEM-1 lOCHEM-1 lOG General Ctemislry 1 5: 1 (4) 

• CHEM-21(yCHEM-210G General Chsnristry I 5:2 (4) 

• CHEM-401 Geology (3) 

• ENVS-102 Environmental Issues (1) 

• ENVS-360 Environment and the AtmosjAiere (3) 

• ENVS-375Wata- Resources (3) 

• MATH-2 1 1 AppKed Calculus 1 (4) or 
MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• Students whose major requirements include CHEM-110, 
CHEM-210, and MAIH-211/MArH-221 take an additional 
courseas approved by the Enviromnental Studiescoordinator 

Combined Bachelor's Degree and 

M.S. in Environmental Science 

This program enables qualiiied students to earn both an un- 
dergraduate degree (in any field) and an MS. in Environmental 
Sciaice. The combined program can be completed wifti four 
years of undergraduate studypdus 12 months of additional grad- 
uate study (fan and spring semesters plus a sumtnerof research 
or irtemdiip). The program offers students an opportunity for 
strong training and careers in environmental science or policy. 

Admission to the Program 

Undergraduates should apply for admission to the combined 
program by the endof the junior year. At a minimum, students 
must haw an overall grade point average of 3.00 or higher, and 
have taken a >«ar of laboratory science (BIO-1 10/210 General 
Biology lAI, CHEM-1 10/210 General Chemistry I/n, 
PHYS-105/205 College Physics I/O or PHYS-1 10/210 
University Physics VU) and a year of caloihis (MATH -221/222, 
MArH-211/212). 

Apjiications mist be accompanied by twa letters of recom- 
ntendatioD and a statemeit of purpose. Graduate Record Exam- 
ination (GRE) scores may be required for admission to the 
contrined prograin Students ^ould discuss their interest in the 
program with the Envinanmental Studies coordinator before 
submitting an apphcation 



Requirements 

• All requirements for a B.A. or B.S. (in any major) at 
American University 

Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hoursof approved 
500-level course work to satisfy the requirements of bofti 
dtegrees. ENVS-580 Environmental Sdencel andENVS-581 
Environmental Science II are recommended. 

• All requirertBnts for the MS. in Environmental Science, 
including a minimum of 24 credit hours ctanpleted in 
residence in graduate status afla- the undergraduate degree 
has been awarded 

M.S. in Environmental Science 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, students mist have completed one year of 
calculus aid one year of laboratory science (biology, chemistry, 
geology, or physics). A semester or more of economics is rec- 
ommended. Admission is based on academic recotxi, personal 
statement, and two lettejs of recommendation The Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE) is required. 

Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours ofapproved graduate work, including 6credit 
tours of ENVS-681 , ENVS^90, andENVS-691 in lieu ofa 
thesis 

Studerts are required to take ENVS-681 during the spring 
semester of their final year, they write a paper based on an 
iriemMiip, research, or independent study and present the 
paper during a vaiue improved by the graduate advisor. 

• One comprehensive examination; a maximum of two 
attempts is permitted. 

Course Requirements 

Core (18 credit hours) 

• CSC-610 IitroductiontoGeogr^hiciifomBtion 

Systems (3) 

• ENVS-580 Environmental Science I: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 

• HvrVS-58 1 EnviiDimiHital ScieiKe 0; A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 

• ENVS-68 1 Environmental Research Seminar and 

ftacticum (3) 
and 

ENVS-690 Environmaital Science Researdi (3) 
or 
ENVS-691 hitemship(3) 

• SrAT-514 Statistical ivfethods (3) 

Electives (18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours chosen in consultation with the graduate 
advisor from each of the two (dustos bdow. A statistics 
course (STAF-S 1 5, STAT-S 16, STAT-520, or STAr-524) may 



130 College of Arts and Sciences 



be substituted for one of the courses; other courses may be 
substituted with permissioD of the graduate advisor. 

• 9 credit hours from fte following environmental science 
courses: 

BIO-562 Aquatic Field Methods (3) 

BIO-563 Terrestrial Field Methxls (3) 

BIO/ENVS-596 Selected Topics; Nonrecurring (approved 

topics) 
ENVS-520 Biogeocfaemistry (3) 
ENrVS-572 Topics in Conservation Biology ( 
ENVS-575 Environmental Ride Assessment (3) 
ENVS-675 Hydrology 

• 9 credit hours from the following environmental 
policy/economics courses: 

ECON-579 Environmental Economics (3) 
ENVS-582 Environmental Law (3) 
PUAD-606 Foundations of Policy Analysis (3) 
SIS-620 Studies in Global Environmental 

Politics (3) (topics) 
SIS-649 Environment and Dewlopment (3) 
SIS-660 Envirenment and PoUtics (3) 
SOCY-689 Environmental Sodology (3) 



Graduate Certificate in 
Environmental Assessment 



Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree from an accredited 
institution. Students must have campldted the following prsreq- 
uisite courses: calculus, statistics, and oi^garric chemistry. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 15 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades of C or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fiilfiUment of certificate requirements, 
although fliese grades will be included in flie calculation of the 
GPA. Students must haw at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. Intanational students must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A nsixirnum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit 

Course Requirements 

• CHEM-671Piincipfcs of Toxicology (3) 

• CSC-610 Introduction to Geographic Information 

Systems (3) 

• ITEC-688 Introduction to Decision Analysis (3) 

• ENVS-575 Environmental Risk Assessment (3) 

• ENVS-681 Environmental Research Seminar and 

Practicum (3) 



History 



Chair Robert GriflBth 

FuU-TUne Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a RL. Beisner, R.R Brown, 

B. Reagan (I>is1inguished Professor Emeiita) 

Professor R.D. Breitman,R Griffith, A.M. Kraut, 

AJ. Licfatman, PS. Nadell 

Associate Professor Emeritus/a V. French, J. A. Malloy, 

T. R. Murphy 

Associate Aofessor E. Findlay, I. Klein, P. Kuznid^ 

Assistant Professor K. Franz, A. Lewis, E. Lohr, 

K. Nonis, A.Q Shelfoid, K. Sims, R J. Stem 

Visiting Assistant Professor T. Robinson, M Oiandrea 

Distinguished Historians in Readenoe A. Nelson, D. Avery 

Historians in Residence J. Banner, J. Bany, P. Henson 

History covers the fiill range of human endeavors: the arts 
and sciences, politics and ttie spread of political ideas, eoo- 
ncmic and technological change, and ttie relationship of indi- 



viduals to their communities and cultures. The Departmeid of 
History at American University encourages interdisciplinary 
study, individually designed programs, and close contact be- 
tween students and faculty. 

The department's outstanding faculty guides students fiirou^ 
the range of fields and approaches employed by historians. The 
undergraduate program exjiores United States, European, and 
world history and includes seminars, discussion groups, intern- 
ships, aid independent studies. A two-semester senior seminar 
provides a capstone experience for all majors that culminates in 
the preparation of a senior thesis. Master's and doctoral students 
may sdect programs in United States or modem European his- 
tory fliat stress research, writing, and historical analysis The de- 
partment also offers programs in public history, whidi can be 
pursued at the master's level or as an outside field in the doctoral 
program 

The Department ofHisfory ofifers a broad range o f iimovative 
courses in cinema and history, popular culture, Afri- 
can-American history, and presidential politics. During the sum- 



History 131 



mer, students may participate in the department's popular 
institutes on nuclear studies and the Civfl War. 

With resources such as ttie National Archives and the I.i- 
braiy of Congress, the Washington, DC. area comprises the 
richest base for archival sources and published works anywhere 
in the United States. Internships are available at history-related 
organizations and imseums such as the National Museum of 
ArrBiicanHistory and the U.S. Holocaust Memarial Museum. 

In addition to preparing students for graduate or law school, 
the Department of History's ertphasis on research, writing, and 
intellectual jjroblem solving prepares its students for work in 
business, government, public interest, journalism, and many 
other professions. 



B.A. in History 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires departmental 
approval. 
University Requiremoits 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college matheitBtics or ttie equivalent by 
examination 

Gieneral Education Requirements 

• Atotaloften courses, consisting ofonefoxmdationcouise and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No riKire than 6 credit hours rtHy be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39 credit hours with grades of C or better including at least 15 
credit hours at the 300 level or above. 

The department recomnends that before enrollingin acourae 
at the 300 level or abow, students should complete a suitable 
introductory course or attain equivalent knowledge. 
Advanced Placement 

Prospective history majors way qualify for 3 advanced 
placement (AP) credits toward the major in both American and 
Eunapean history (for a total of 6 credits), provided the appro- 
priate AP examination grade is a 4 or 5 . Students cannot lecei w 
AP credit towards flie major if ttiey also take the comparable 
survey courses in either ArrBrican history (HlST-205 and 
HISr-206) or European history (HIST-110). A satisfactory In- 
ternational Baccalaureate (IB) examination may count toward 
fulfilling a specific course requirement for flie major. Entering 
students with academic credit for IB examiiBtions in history 
courses should consult with the department . Atotal of 6 AP and 
IB credits can be counted toward the history major. 
Course Requirements 

• HIST-480 Major Seminar I (3) 

• HIST-48 1 Major Seminar D (3) 

• One course in ancient or riKdieval history 



• Onecoursein Asian, HastEuropean,nr>deraMiddle Eastern, 
or Russian history 

• One course in African, Afncan-Amcrican, I-atin American, 
or Native American history 

• OneccMTsein Western European or British history at Am 300 
level or above 

• One course in U.S, history at the 300 level or above 

• Additional courses to nBke a total of39credit hours in history 
(which may include JWST-205 Ancient andMedieval JewiA 
Civiliiation). At least 30 ofthe 39credit hours mist be takoi 
at American University, at least 15 ofthe 39 must be at the 
300 lev^l or above. 

Special Opportunities 

• Dorothy Ditter Gondos Award, Janet Oppenheim Mstoiy 
Essay Prize 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors lYogram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate witti Univeraty Ffonors in the major. To fiiliiU 
requirerrBnts for Lfaiversity Honors in History, students may 
enroU in 500-level seminars, or in Lfaiversity Honors Colloquia 
tau^t by history faculty meirfcers, or may anange an Honors 
supplement to a regular course, or an Honors independent study 
in history. All students must complete a two-semester sequence 
in the mqor sranrnar, as a "capstone" experiaice. The depart- 
ment's Honors coordinator advises students in the Universify 
Honors Ptogram reg^uxling deptutrtBntal options. 



Minor in History 



• 21 credit hours with grades of C or better and witii at least 12 
credit hours unique to the rrinor 

Course Requirements 

• One course in Western European or British history at the 300 
level or above 

• One course in US. history at the 300 level or above 

• One course in an area other tiian Western European, ftitish, 
or U.S. history 

• Fourmoreooursesinhistory, including at least hw) at the 300 
level or above. The department requires ttiat all 300-levd 
courses be taken at American University. 

At least 12ofthe21 credit hours in history must be taken at 
American University. 

Minor in Israeli Studies 

The minor in IsraeU Studies is an interdisciplinary program 
that draws on faculty and courses related to Isiael fiom across 
the campus. Students take three core courses focused on ttie his- 
tory and civiU^tion of Israel and the relatioo^ps between Is- 
rael and the Arab world They then take 9 additional credit 
hours in approved elective course work. Students in the minor 
are encouraged to study sbroadin laael and to take Hebrew lan- 
guage courses. 



1 32 CoDe ge of Arts and Sciences 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the minor requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 and approval of the program director. 
Requirements 

• 18 credit hours with grades of C or bettsr wifli at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor and at least 9 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 
Core (9 credit hours) 

• HIST-245 Modem Jewish Civilizatian (3) 

• raST-343 History of Israel (3) 

• SIS-365Arab-IsraeliRel^ons(3) 

Electives (9 credit hours) 

• 9 credit hours from the following with approval of fce 
program director. 

HIST-344 Topics in JewiA History (3) (approved topics) 

JWSr-320 Topics in Jewish Culture (3) (approved tc^ics) 

mST-390 hidependent Reading (1-6) 

JWCT-490 Independent Study (l-<5) 

JWST-491 Intonship (1 -6) 

SIS-400 Senior Seninar in Intematianal Relations (3); 

Isradi Identity 
Study abroad in Israel is highly recommended and with 
approval of the program director courses taken abroad may 
fulfill minor requirements 

Combined B.A. and M.A. in BUstory 

The program enables students to cotrplete both the B.A. 
and MA. in History in five years of fioll-time study. 

Admission to the Program 

Interested students should apply for admission to the pro- 
gram in their junior year. Students in ftis program are not re- 
quired to take the Graduate Record Examination (ORE). 
Students wiH be admitted formally to MA. status only if they 
have cotrqjleted all requirements fijrtheB.A in History with at 
least anoveiall 3.00 grade point average anda 3.20 grade point 
average in history courses. 
Requirements 

• AUiequtrements for the B.A. in History 
Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours of 
sqjproved 5004evel course work in history to satisfy 4ie 
requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A. in History, including a 
minimum of 24 credit hours corspleted in residence in 
graduate status after the imdergraduate degree has been 
awarded. 



M.A. in History 



Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments fi>r graduate study, qiplicants mist earn a satisfactcsy 



score on tiie Graduate Record Examination (verbal, quantit^ve, 
and analytic). Admission is based on academic record, test 
scores, letters of recommendation fiom two professors with 
whom work was taken recently, and favorable judgment by the 
department graduate committee and chair. 

Degree Requirements 

• 30^33 credit hours of approved graduate work; no nrwe than 
50 percent of course wwk may be done in 300/600 level 
courses. 

• Tool of researdi: a relevant foreign language, quantitative 
methods, statistics, corrputer science, oral history, new 
information technologies', or a methodology apjaowd by the 
graduate committee of the Department of History 

• One comprehensive exarrination 

• Standard (nontbesis) optiorL Two substantial research papers 
with grades of B or better, one in HIST-75 1/752 Research 
Seminar and one in HIST-500 Studies in History 

Theas option; a satisfactory thesis, corrq)leted ttirough 6 oedit 
hours of HIST-797 Masta-'s Thesis Seminar with grades of B 
or better 
Course Requirements 

• HIST-500 Studies in History (3) with a grade of B or better 

• Two colloquiafixMn the following with grades of B or better 
HIST-720 Colkxjuium in Modem European History 

since 17891(3) 
HIST-721 Colloquium in Modan European History 

since 1789 n (3) 
HIST-727 Colloquium in IWted States History L 

to 1865 (3) 
HIST-728 Colloquium in IMted States Mstory II: 

since 1865 (3) 
or approved substitute for one of the above colloquia 

• HIST-744 The Historian's Crafi (3) with a grade of B or 
bettCT, taken in the student's first fall semester in the program 

• Standard (nontbesis) option: 
One of the following 

HIST-75 1 Research Seminar in European History (3) 

HIST-752 Research Seminar in United States History (3) 

or appoved substitute 

or 

Theas option: HIST-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (6) 

• 12-15 credit hours in approved graduate course work 
or 

Public History Concentration 

• HIST-729 Public History Seminar (3) wifli a grade of 
B or better 

• HIST-730 Public History Practicum (3) with a grade of B or 
betto- 

• HIST-«91hitemdiip in History (3) 

• 6 credit hours in approved graduate course work 



Jewish Studies 133 



Ph.D. in mstory 



Admission to the Program 

In addition to rrceting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, apphcants nomially have completed an 
MA in History or a related field, have earned a satisfiictory 
score on the Ciradurfe Record Exam (Verbal, Quantitative, and 
Analytic^ and have made a substantial beginning in one tool of 
research. Admission is b^ed on academic record, lettersof rec- 
ommendation fiomtwo professors with whom woik was taken 
recently, a sarrple of recent written woik of substantial length 
(MA thesis, research paper, or interpretative essay) and favor- 
able judgment by the department's graduate commitee and de- 
I>artment chair. 
Degree Requirements 

• 72 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Two of the following as tools of research; relevant foreign 
languages, quantitative methods, statistics, computer science, 
oral history, or a methodology ap{XOved by fte graduate 
committee of the Department of History 



• Comprehensive examtnaticns in four fields: Coirprehensive 
examinations are olTered in the areas of ancient history. 
United States history, modem European history, Britidi 
history, Latin American history, modem Asian history, 
Russian history, and diplomatic history. 

One field nust be a historical field outside tt>e students main 
area of concentration, a comparative or multidisciptinary 
field, or a field in anottier discipline. 

• Dissertation and oral defense (Dissertation work is not 
usually available in ancient, Russian, Asian, or Latin 
American history.) 

Course Requirements 

Specific course requinanents depend on wbether studmts re- 
ceived ttiar MA in History from Americai University. Farmoie 
infcxmation, consult the D^artment of History. 

• HIST-744 The Historian's Craft (3) with a ^de of B or 
better, taken in the student's first semester of coirse work 

• HIST-799 Doctoral Disseitiion Seminar (12-24) 
Special Opportunities 

• Internships at the National Archives, U.S. government 
agencies, and local historical societies 



Jewish Studies 



Director Pamela S. NadeU 

Faculty from other schools and departments of the university 
teach courses in the progratn. 



The Jewish Studies Program recognizes that Jews and Juda- 
ism constitute a distinct )et integral conponent of the baitage 
of \\festem civili2ation. Jewidi studies courses analyze the civi- 
lization of the Jews and its various cultural and rebgjous expres- 
sions fixjm the patriarchal period to the present. 

Jewish studies courses embrace the total experience of the 
Jewish people, spanning the spectrum of the arts, humaiities, 
and the social sciences. Moreover, since dynamic contact witti 
many other religions and cultures iifluaiced the development 
of Jewish civilization, courses view Jews and Judaism within 
the broader context of ttiese dominant societies, and enrich 
one's understanding of American and vwrld Jewries. The ma- 
jors and minors in Jewiii studies prepare students for leader- 
ship within and service to the Jewish oomnunity, and for a 
grester xmderstanding of our pluralistic society. 

As a center of Jewidi organizational life, Wa^iingtan, D.C. 
provides opportunities for internships wifti local Jewish organi- 
zations devoted to oomrrunity relations, religious activities, Is- 
rael, and social welfere. A Jewish studies minor confcined with 
an education major may lead to certification for teaching in 
Jewish sdiook 



B.A. in Jewish Studies 



Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a grade point avei^ 
age of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and the approval of the director of 
the program. 

UniverNty Requiicments 

• Atotal of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 oedit hoiTS of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouises,consistingofonefoundationcouiseand 
one second4evel course in an ajjproved sequence firemeach 
of the five currioilar areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• HEBR-216Hebrew, Intermediate Modem I (3) 

• HEBR-217HebiEW,IiiermedialeModeran(3) 

or equivalent pn3ficiaicy in Hebrew as approved by the 
Jewi^ Studies Acuity. 



134 College of Arte and Sciences 



Note: HEBR-116/HEBR-117 Hebrew, Hementary Modem 
I/II are prerequisites for tbe language requiremait but do not 
count toward the mqor. 

• HIST-245 Modem Jewish Civilization (3) 

• JWST-205/JWST-205G Ancient and Medieval Jewish 

Civilizaticn 2:2 (3) 

• JWST-481 Senior Thesis in Jewish Studies I (3) 

• JWCT-482 Senior Thesis in Jewish Studies 11(3) 

• One course in Jewish literature 

• One course in Jewish thought 

• One course in oontemporary Jewish life 

• 1 2 additional credit hours in Jewish Studies 

Eighteai of the total 39hours must be at the 300 level orabove. 
Related courses from ottier university departments may be used 
with approval of fee piogram director. 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors work 
in the department and, upon departmental Fecomnendation, 
graduate wift Univeraty Honors in the major. The depart- 
nsnt's Honors coordinator advises students in the University 
Hcmors Program regarding departmental options. 



Minor in Jewisli Studies 



• IScredithourswithgradesofCorbetterandatleast 12(aBdit 
hours unique to the minor, 9 of the 18 credit hours rmst be at 
the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• HIST-245 Modem Jewish CiviUzation (3) 

• JWST-205/JWST-205G Ancient and Medieval Jewish 

Civflization 2:2 (3) 

• One course in Jewiii hterature 

• One course in Jewi^ bought 

• One course in contenporary Jewish life 

• One additional course in Jewidi studies 
Special Opportunities 

Dr. Everett and Marian Gordon Scholarship Awards in 
Jewish Studies Established in 1976 to provide awards for out- 
standing senior theses in Jewish Studies, and sdiolarships for 
classroom perfomBnce by students in Jewish studies courses, 
with preference given to students without previous background 
in Jewish studies. 

Jerrold and Jane Goodman Scholarships EstabUshed in 
1 979 through an armual grant from YabUck Charities, Inc. Schol- 
arships are awarded armually to outstanding students in Jewish 
studies. 



Language and Foreign Studies 



Chair Nadia Harris 
Full-Time Faculty 
Professor Emeritus/a E.I. Burkait, GS. Bmkart, 

V. Medish, J. SchiUinger 

Professor N.S. Baron, J. Child, B.F. Steinbruckner 
Associate Ftafessor Emeritus/a V.Z. Borkovec, 
M A. Charbormeaux, J. W. Goldin, MA.G Hood, 
H. Pineda 

Associate Professor N. Harris, C. Ifemandez, A. Israeli, 
A. Ohver, D. Rodamar, O. Rojer, J. Wisman 
Assistant Professor Emerita E. Kaiazikas 
Assistant Professor S. Aoshima, F. Cortes-Conde, 
N. Ishihara, A. Sena, R. Vbn Woixie, B. Werth 
Instructor G Berg, R. Cavaceppi, E. Dawley, 
E. Holtermarm, E. Lang, MJPiniero, R Roman, K VeHeman, 
In an increasingly conplex world that grows smaller every 
d^, the study of languages, literatures, and cultures is of vital 
irrportance. Learning the ways other nations live and think firr- 
thers understanding among peoples and cultures. The Depart- 
ment of Language and Foreign Studies (LFS) offers extensive 
undergraduate study in French, German, Russian, and Latin 
Ancrican and Siianish foreign language and culture, as well as 
two jointly-administered programs: one in area studies and 
language with the School of IntematiorBl Service and a foreign 



language and communication media program with the School of 
Communication. In addition, language courses in Arabic, Chi- 
nese, Farsi, Ffcbrew, Italian, and JapaiKse are offered each aca- 
demic year. Other languages soriEtimes offered include Hindi, 
Korean, Polish, Swahih, and Tinkish. Czech is offered in Prague 
through the AU Abroad program Master's programs include the 
M.A. in Spanish: Latin American Studies and the M.A. in 
TESOL (Teaching English to Speakas of Other Languages). 
(For admission and requirement infomBtion, see TESOL.) 

Programs in language and foreign studies meet the needs of 
both departmental majors and oftier sluderls in the university. 
Many undergraduates choose to minor in a language area or to 
confide a translation certificate. Intemshqis and cooperative 
educatbn programs are available boft locally and intematiorBUy 
for foreign language programs and TESOL Students can also 
erdianoe their language skills through study in the AU Alsoad 
program Students can oorrqjlete translation certificates as part of 
their degree requirements or earn credits towards a TESOL cer- 
tificate. 

Many areas of business, industry, and govermnent service 
consider a language background a career must Recent graduates 
of the department have been employed in a variety of organiza- 
tions and fields including the Department of State, Library of 
Congress, National Security Agency, \bice of America, and Na- 
tional Academy of Sciaices, as well as intematioaal import and 



Language and Foreign Studies 1 3 5 



export finns, public and private schools and colleges, and re- 
seaich and development linns. 

Lai^uage Resource Center 

The Language Resource Center (LRC) o f the Department of 
I^anguagc and Foreign Studies is a comprehensive, milti -media 
facihty which supports students and faculty in the study and 
teaching of foreign languages and cultures tiirou^ the use of 
advanced technologies in audio, video, fihn, computer, and sat- 
ellite telecommunications. 

The LRC is located in the Asbury Building lower level and 
is reached via the street-level entrance to the north wing of 
Asbury. For more information call 202-885-2396. 

Undergraduate Language Program Courses 

First Year 100-Level Elementary Cowses Emphasis on 
developing basic language sidlls for oral and written communi- 
catioD with special attention to diverse cultural patterns. Three 
to five acadeiric hours of class instruction per week supple- 
mented by individual language laboratory work. A "native" 
speaker of a foreign language cannot enroll in or earn credit to- 
ward graduaticn in a 1 00-level course. 

Second Year 200-Level Intermediate Cbunes Enphasis 
on cultuial p>attems and contrasts betweai cultures, refinement 
of basic language ^lls, study of more conplex grammatical 
structures, and expansion of vocabulary in a cultural context. 
Three to five academic hours of class instruction per week sup>- 
plemented by individual language laboratory work. A "native" 
speaker of a foreign language cannot enroll in or earn credit to- 
ward graduatioD in a 200-level course. 

Third Year 300-Level Non-topics Courses Em{diasis on 
advanced language use and refinement of coreplex grammatical 
structures, focusing on culturally-specific contexts. Three aca- 
demic hours of class instniction per week A "native" speaker of 
a foreign language cannot enroll in or earn credit toward gradu- 
ation in a 300-level non-topics course. 

300-, 400- and SOO-Level Topics Courses Topics courses 
tau^t in the targd language designed for both majors and 
nonmajois. 

300- and 400-Level Civilization Courses Multi-&ceted 
approach to the surwy of a target civilization designed for both 
majors and nonmajors. 

Note: A "native" speaker of a foreign language is defined as a 
person whose pre-ooUege level instruction was conducted prin- 
cipally in that language. Studaits who have significant knowl- 
edge of a foreign language gained outside of pre-college 
instruction may also be considered by LFS to be "nsdve" qseak- 
ers, but may have vahd reasoiis for studying the language at the 
300 level or lower. Requests for suchconsiderstion will be eval- 
uated on acase-by-case basis, and should be directed to the chair 
of the Department of Language and Foreign Studies. 



B.A. in French, German, Russian, or 
Spanish Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Students must be approved by the department for formal ad- 
mission to the major. Language course work may be waived if 
high school or other preparation warrants it. Placement will be 
made in consultation wife a departmental advisor 
Majors 

French, Qerman, Russian, or Danish Studies 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examiiEition 

General Education Requirements 

• AtotaloftencoxnseSjConsistingofonefoundationcoursearjd 
one second4evel course in an approved sequence fix)meach 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• French, German or Spanish: 39 credit hours with grades of C 
or better. Prerequisite; corrpletion of intermediate language 
level. 

Russian: 36 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Rtrequisite: corrpleticm of intermediate language lewl. 

• One of the following field concentrations: 

12 credit hours in a second foreigo language at any level 

or 

12 credit hours in area studies in the major field at the 300 

level or above 

or 

Teacha- education leading to certification to teach a foreigi 

language (Frendi, German, or Spanish) at the secondary level 

or 

An approved mirMr related to the mq'or field; fi)r example, 

anothe' language, business adrninistration, communication, 

econorracs, poUtical science, history, sociology, Uterature, 

anthropology, or international studies 

Course Requirements 
French P9 credit hours) 

• FREN-322 Advanced French I (3) (iray be replaced by 
other 300- or 500-level courses if warranted by language 
proficiency) 

• FREN-323 Advanced French II (3) (may be replaced by 
other 300- or 500-level courses if warranted by language 
proficiency) 

• WEii-^^A Civilisation Fraiu^aise I (y) 

• FREN-325 CivUisation FranQoise U (3) 



1 36 CoDege of Arts and Sciences 



3 credit hours oflinguistics course woric from the following 
ANTH-225/ANrH-225G Language and Human 

Expaienoe 1 :2 (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 
TESL-5xx course as apiproved by advisor 
Remaining credit hours at the 300 level or above in French 
studies 
German (39 credit hours) 

GERM-332 German Conversation and Conpoation I (3) 

(may be replaced by ottier 300- or 400-level comses if 

warranted by language proficiency) 

QERM-333 Goman Conwisation and Composilion 11 (3) 

(may be replaced by other 300- or 400- level courses if 

warranted by language proficiency) 

GERM -438 German Civihzation I (3) 

GERM-439 German QviUzation U (3) 

3 credit hours oflinguistics course work fitjm the following 

ANTH-225/ANrH-225G Language and Hunan 

Experience 1:2(3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 
TESL-5xx course as approved by advisor 
Remaining credit hours chosen fiwm 300-400 -level courses, 
independait study jrojects, internships, and topics courses 
in German studies 
Russian (36 credit hours) 

RUSS-342 Russian Conversation and Composition I (3) 
RUSS-343 Russian Conversation andCon;x>sition n (3) 
21 oedit hours fiomthe following: 
RUSS-441 Russian Media and Pohtical Translation (3) 
400-500-leve! Russian Uterature, topics, or linguistics 

courses 
LFS-390 hdependent Reading Course (1^) or 
LFS-490 Independent Study Project (1-6) 
3 credit hours oflinguistics course work firm the following 
ANTH-225/ANrH-225G Language and Human 

Expaience 1 :2 (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 
TESL-5xx course as ajjproved by advisor 
Additional courses to fulfill credit hour requirements 
selected in consultation with advisor 
Spanish (39 credit hours) 

SR\N-3 52 Spanish Conversation and Composition I (3) 

(may be replaced by other 300- or 500-level course if 

warranted by language proficiency) 
' SPAN-353 Spani^ Conversation and Conposition II (3) 

(may be replaced by other 300- or 500-level course if 

warranted by language proficiency) 
I SR^N-357 Intrwluctbn to Latin Amaican Liteiature (3) 
i SPAN-450 Spanish Qvihzation I: Spain (3) 
> SPAN-451 Spanish Civilization 11; Latin America (3) 



• SPAN^91 hitemsh^j: Spanish (2-6) 

• 3 credit hours oflinguistics course work from the following: 
ANTH-225/ANTH-225G Language and Human 

Experience 1:2(3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 
SPAN-356 Spanish Topics (3) (approved topic) 
SPAN-361 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 
TESL-5xx course as approved by advisor 

• Remaining credit hours chosen from Spanish topics, 
colloquium, and literature courses 

University Honors Program 

Students in the Univeraty Honors Programhave the opportu- 
nity to graduate with Lhiversity Ifcnors in the nxtjor. To do so, 
students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors work in 
the department and, upon departmental lecommendation, gndu- 
ate with Univeraty Honors in the rtBJor. The department's 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Honors 
Program re^irding departmental options. 

Minor in French, German, Russian, or 
Spanish Language 

Requirements 

• 24 credit hours with grades of C or better in courses tau^ in 
the fiweign language with 12 credit hours at the 300 levd or 
above; ora total of 1 8 credit hours at the 300 level orabove. At 
least 1 2 credit hours must be unique to the minor. 

Minor in Japanese Language 

Requirements 

• 24 credit hours with grades ofC or better with 6 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above, at least 1 2 credit hours mist be unique 
to the rrnnor 

Minor in Russian Studies 

Requirements 

• LFS-200/LFS-200G Russia andtheUhited States 3:2 (3) 

• 15 credit hours with grades of C or better in Russian studies 
from course ofierings in at least three di£ferent departments. 
Nine of these 1 5 credit hours must be at the 300 level orabove. 
At least 12 credit hours mist be unique to the minor. 

B.A. in Foreign Language and 
Communication Media 

Admission to the Program 

Students are admitted dtfaer to the School of Communication 
or to the DepartrrBnt of Language and Foreign Studies of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 
Program IVacks 

French, German, Russian, or Spanish oombiied with Road- 
cast Journalism, Print Joumalism, Public Communicatbn, or Vi- 
sual Media 



Language and Foreign Studies 137 



University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college nBthenBtics or toe equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotalof ten couises, consisting of one foundation courw and 
one second-level couree in an approved sequence from each 
of five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 54 credit hours with grades of C or better 

• Prerequisite competency in the major language at the 
idennediate level 

Course Requirements 

• <X)MM-10(yCOMM-100GUndErstanding 

Mass Media 4:1 (3) 

• COMM-200 Writing fijr Mass Comnunication (3) 

• Tliree cotnnvnication and media studies courses fixxn the 
School of Comimnication 

• Two approved courses related to any contemporary culture 

• One ofthe following: 
ANTH-225/ANTH-2250 Language and Human 

Experience 1:2 (3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 
TESL-5xx linguistics course as approved by advisor 

• Five professional courses in one ofthe four comnunication 
program tracks: broadcast journalism, print journalism, 
public commmication, or visual media 

• 15 credit hours of courses in the major language at the 300 
level or above taken in the Oepartment of I^anguage and 
Foreign Studies 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors ftt)gram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To da 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors woik 
in fee department and, upon departmental recommendation, 
graduate with Ltai versity Honors in the major The department 's 
Honors coordinator advises students in ttie Univeisity Honois 
Program regaiding departmental optiona 

B.A. in Language and Area Studies 

The B.A. in Language and Area Studies is deagned for stu- 
dents witti a strong interest in aregion ofthe world and ina lan- 
guage of that region. This innovative program achieves a 
balance between humanities and social sciences courses, com- 
bined wi& an advanced level of foreign language study. Ths 
program, joinHy designed and adnmistered by the College of 
Arts and Sciences (CAS) and the School of International Ser- 
vice (SIS), builds on the strengths ofthe CAS Dqiartment of 



Language and Foreign Studies (LFS) and the SIS GeU of Com- 
parative and Regional Studies 

Admission to the Program 

To be considered for fieshman admission, an applicant 
should have earned at least a 3.00 average in secondary school. 
Students from other regionally accredited collegiate institu- 
tions, and students in other programs at Anwican University 
who have completed the freshman year, should maintain a cu- 
mulative grade point average of 3 .00 (on a 4.00 scale) to be con- 
sidered for transfer to the program 

Majors 

French/Europe, Gemian/Europe, Russian/Area Studies, or 
Spanish/Latin America 

University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college nBthenstics or ttie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotalof ten couises, consisting of one foundation course and 
one second-level couise Gom an approved sequence from 
each ofthe five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

M^jor Requirements 

• 51 credit hours with grades of C or better 

• Pro ficiency in the appropriate foreign language demonstrated 
by achieving a B (3.00) average or better for all course woik 
in the foreign language taken in the Department of Language 
and Foreign Studies. 

Students may, where appropriate, and with Faculty Advisory 
Committee approval, select spedal topics courses to fitlfill 
requirements. Student may also Jq)ply up to 3 credit houis 
toward the major froman approved internship or cooperative 
education field experimce. Study abroad course credits may 
be used toward ttie major with ttie appDval ofthe Faculty 
Advisory Committee. 

Course Requirements 

Foundation Courses (9 credit hours) 

• SIS-105/SIS-105G Worid Rjlitics 3:1 (3) 

• One interculturalcomminicationcoursefromthe following: 
SIS-140/SIS-140G Cross Cultural Conmumcatian 3: 1 (3) 
SIS-340 Foundations of International Comnunication (3) 
SIS -341 Intereultural Commmication (3) 

• One comparative poUtics course from the following: 
GOVT-130/GOVT-130GCompfflative Politics 3:1 (3) 
GOVT-231 Thiid Worid Politics (3) 

GOVT-232 PoUtics of Post industrial Societies (3) 



1 38 CoDe ge of Arts and Sciences 



Foreign Language Courses (18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit houisofcourse work in a single fijreigQlanggageat 
the 300 level or above. 

Area Studies (21 credit hours) 

• 15 credit hours, witti 12 credit hours at the 300 level or 
above, in humanities courses, including 3 credit hours from 
the Department of Mstory (HIST-xxx) and an additional 3 
credit hours of course work with a strong historical 
conponent, from the following. Other appropriate area 
studies courses may be substituted with ttic approval of flie 
major advisor 

French/Europe 

ARTH-101 European Art: Renaissance to flie Present (3) 

FREN-324 Civilisation Fran^aise I (3) 

FREN-325 Civilisation Framboise II (3) 

FREN-326 Frarch Topics (3) 

FREN-327 Le Frangais Commercial (3) 

FRB^-328 Frendi Translstion; Concepts sod Practice (3) 

FRI3V-365 Las Registres du Fran^ais (3) 

FREN-432 Le Siecle des Lumieres (3) 

FREN^33 Le Romantisme (3) 

FREN^34 Le Realisms (3) 

FREN-435 Litterature Contemporaine (3) 

PHIL-3 1 1 Modem European MDvements (3) 
German/Europe 

ARTH-101 European Art Renaissance to flie Piesent(3) 

GERM-336 Gaman Topics (3) 

GERM-338 Introduction to German Translation (3) 

GERM-432 Studies in Gaman Fihn (3) 

GERM -433 German Lyric Poetry (3) 

GERM-438 German Civilization 1 (3) 

GERM-439 Gaman Civilization 11 (3) 

HIST-239 Modem Germany since 1848 (3) 

HIST-318 Nazi Germany (3) 

LFS-230/230G The Modernist Expbsioa Culture and 
Ideology in Europe (3) 

PHII^3 1 1 Modem European Movenents (3) 
Russian/Area Studies 

HIST-225/HIST-225G Russia; Past and Resent 3:2 (3) 

HIST-230 Early Russian mstory, 988 1 700 (3) 

HIST-231 hnperial Russia, 1700-1917 (3) 

HIST-232 Twentieth Century Russia (3) 

HIST-345 Russian Studies (3) (topics) 

LIT-367 Russian and Soviet Literature (3) 

LIT-368 Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy (3) 

RUSS-347 Introduction to Russian literature (3) 

RUSS-441 Russian Media and PoUtical Translation (3) 

RUSS-543 Russian Classics (3) 
RUSS-548 Topics in Russian Studies (3) 
Spanish/Latin America 
HIST-241 Colonial Latin America (3) 
HIST-242 Latin America since Independence (3) 
HIST-340 Latin American Studies (3) (topics) 



LFS-210/LFS-210G Latin America: Hisfeny, Art, 

Literature 3:2 (3) 
SPAN-356 Spanish Topics (3) 
SPAN-357 Introduction to Latin American Literature (3) 
SPAN-358 Introduction to Spanish Translation (3) 
SPAN-3 59 Advanced Spanish Translation (3) 
SPAN-450 Spanish Qvibzation I: Spain (3) 
SPAN-451 Spanish Civilization II: Latin America (3) 
SPAN-491 Spanish hrtemship: Proyecto Amistad (2-6) 
SPAN-554 Classics of Latin American Literatute (3) 
SPAN-559 Colloquium on Latin America (3) 
• 6 credit hours of course work in social science courses, 
selected from ttie following. Other appropriate area studies 
courses may be substituted with the approval of 4ie mEijor 
advisor 
French/Europe 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 

ECON-3 18 Economic History (3) 

ECON-351 Conparative Econorrric Systems (3) 

ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 

GOVT-232 Politics of Postindustrial Societies (3) 

GOVT-432 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Countries (3) (topics) 
GOVT-532 Pobtical histitutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
SIS-331 Overview of the European Union (3) 
SIS-355 The Relations of West European Naticms (3) 
SIS-530 Colloquium on the Common Market (3) 
SIS-557 ForeigD Policy Formulation in West European 

States (3) 
Germ an/Europe 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 

ECON-3 18 Economic History (3) 

ECON-351 Conparative Ecor»mic Systans (3) 

ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 

GOVT-232 Politics of Postindustrial Societies (3) 

GOVT-432 Political Institutions and Processes in Sdected 

Countries (3) (topics) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
HIST-239 Modem Germany sioce 1848 (3) 
HIST-3 1 8 Nazi Gernany (3) 
SIS-331 Overview of the European Union (3) 
SIS-355 Ihe Relations of West European Nations (3) 
SIS-530 Colloquium on ftie Common Maricet (3) 
SIS -551 Economy, Politics and Society in Europe (3) 
SIS-557 Foreign Policy Formulation in West European 

States (3) 
Russian/Area Studies 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
ECON-3 18 Economic History (3) 
ECON-351 Comparative Economic Systans (3) 
ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 



l.aiiguage and Fordgn Studies 1 39 



ECON-552 Economics of Transition (3) 

QOVT-432 Political Institutions and Rocesses in Selected 

Countries: Former USSR (3) 
QOVT-532 Political Institutions and FVocesses in Selected 

Regions: Eastern Europe (3) 
H1ST-225/HIST-2250 Russia: Past and Present 3:2 (3) 
HIST-230 Early Russian HLstory, 988-1700 (3) 
HIST-231 Iitperial Russia, 1700-1917(3) 
HIST-232 Twentieth Century Russia (3) 
HIST-345 Russian Studies (3) (topics) 
LFS-200/LFS-200G Russia and tto United States 3:2 (3) 
SIS-258 CcMtenporary Russia (3) 
SIS-381 Foreign Fblicies of the Great R3was(3) 
SIS-558 Authoritarianism and Demoaacy in Russia (3) 
Spanish/Latin America 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 

BCON-351 Conparative Economic Systems (3) 

BCON-361 Economic Development (3) 

BCON-3 1 8 EcoiBmic History (3) 

OOVT-432 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Cbuntries (3) (topics) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Rocesses in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
HIST-241 Colonial Latin Ansrica (3) 
HIST-242 Latin America since Independence (3) 
HIST-340 Latin American Studies (3) (topics) 
SIS-276 Conten^iorary Latin Amsrica (3) 
SIS-337 International Development (3) 
SIS-577 International Relations of the Americas (3) 
SOCY-531 Regional Studies in Social Change: Latin 

America (3) 
Senior Capstone (3 credit hours) 

• Students enroll either in an SIS conq)arative seminar cr in an 
{qipioved tcpics or seninar course in Language and Foreign 
Studies 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors RDgram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Ffonois woik 
in the department and, upon departmental recommendation, 
graduate with Ltaiversity Honors in&e major The department "^ 
Honors coordinator advises students in flie Uiiveisity Honors 
Programregaiding departmental options. See flie section on the 
University Honors Program for ftffftjer details 

Minor in Language and Area Studies 

• 24 credit hours with grades ofC or better and at least 12 credit 
hours uniqtE to ftie minor 

Course Requireinents 

• 12 credit hours in the Depertment of Language aid Foreign 
Studies at flie 200 level or above, including two courses at the 
300 level. 



• 12 credit hours selected fiom an trppwoved hst of courses in 
area studies 

Courses include those from anthropology (ANlH-xxx), 
economics (ECON-xxx), history (HBT-xxx), international 
studies (SIS-xxx), literature (LIT-xxx), or sociology 
(SOCY-xxx); one 3 -credit course must be si the 300 level or 
above from SIS; one 3-credit course imst be from history. 

• Areas offered: 

French/Europe, German/Europe, Russian/ Area Studies, 
S^aniA/Latin America see list of approved courses formajor 
in Language and Area Studies, above. 
Japanese/ Asia: consult LAS degree program advisor for 
approval of courses for this minor. 

Undergraduate Certificate in Translation 

Students receive an Undergraduate Certificate in French, 
Gennan, Russian, or Spanish by completing 15 credit hours of 
comse work according to the sequence required fbrtheirpartic- 
ular language . All courses taken in the Department ofLanguage 
and Foreign Studies toward the certiiicate may be used by un- 
dergraduates toward departmental majors or minors in the same 



The en^hasisof this {HDgram is on translation into EngU^. 
This certificate program provides students with an academic 
grounding in translation theory and practice . Students interested 
in obtaining fiirther traielatiaa credentials are encouraged to 
discuss their options with the appropriate language advisor 

For core courses to count toward the certificate, studoits 
must receive a grade of B or better, for elective courses, a grade 
of C or better is required. For non-core courses, students com- 
plete an additional translation project beyond ttie normal course 
requirements and rrust receive a satisfactory evaluation for their 
project. Students will only be pertritted to do these translation 
projects after having completed at kast cne of the first t\M) core 
courses. 

Admission to the Program 

Open to all students who have conpleted the appupriate 
300-level Conversation and Corr^xisitionll or Advanced II lan- 
guage course, or equivalent. Equivalency is determined in con- 
sultation with faculty advisor. Studraits wiiose native language 
is not English must meet university requirements for Engli^ 
cornpetency (mininum TOEFL score of 600). Before com- 
mencing the program, students should consult the expropriate 
advisor in the Departmert of Language aid Foreigp Studies to 
plan out ftieir program of study. 

French Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements 

Core 

• FREN-328 French Traislation: Concepts and Practice (3) 

• FREN-329 French Translation Wirkstop (3) 

• At least one of the folbwing: 
FREN-327 Le Frangais Commerciai (3) 



140 CoDege of Arts and Sciences 



FREN-365 Les Registres du Fran^ais (3) 
FREN-430 Syntaxe el Style du Frangais (3) 
Electives 

• Two comses selected fixjm the other cote courses or from 
offerings in Fraich at the level of FREN-326 or above. 

German Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements 

Core 

• GERM-338IntroductiontoGemian Translation (3) 

• OERM-339BusineffiGemian(3) 
Electives 

• Three courses selected from oflferingp in German at ftie level 
of GERM-336or above 

Russian Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements 

Core 

• RUSS-441 Ru£sian Media and Political Iransbtion (3) 

• RUSS-443 Russian BusiiKss Translation (3) 

• One of the following 

RUSS-546 Russian Advanced Gramnar and 

Composition I (3) 
RUSS-547 Russian Advanced Gianmar and 
Coirposition II (3) 
Electives 

• Two comses selected from the otha- core course or fix»n 
offerings in Russian at the level of RUSS-347 or above. 

Spanish IVanslation Certificate 

Course Requirements 

Core 

• SPAN-3 58 Introduction to Spanish Translation (3) 

• SPAN-359 Advanced Spanish Translation(3) 

• One of the following 

SPAN-3 61 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 
SPAN-3 56 Spanish Topics: Applied ^BnishLin^ustics (3) 
Advanced Spanish Qrammar and Conposition (3) 
Electives 

• Two courses selected than the other core courses or frtxn 
offerings in Spanish at the level of SPAN-356 or above. 

M.A. in Spanish: Latin American Studies 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minirnum university require- 
ments for graduate study, applicants should be proficient in 
Spanish, familiar with ttie culture, and normally hold a B A. in 
Spanish Bofe part-time and full-time students are welcome in 
the program Appiicants are required to submit a sample of 
written work in Spanidi as part of their fomBl iqiplication to 
the program 



Degree Requirements 

• 33 credit hoursofapproved graduate work, ofwhich at least 21 
credit hours miet be in courses taught in Spanish. Course work 
includes 21 credit hours of core requirements and 12 aedit 
hours in a field of concentration. 

• Thesis optioir Studeats complete 6 credit hours of SPAN-797 
Master's Thesis Seminar as part of flieir ooncentratjoa 
Non-thesis option: Students complete two offerings of 
SPAN-705 or one offering of SPAN-705 phis a research 
project in any approved course within Spanish: Latin 
American Studies in LFS, with grades of B or better. 

• Comprehaisive exanination: 

A two-part written conqjiehensive exam, one part in Spanish, 
one part ineither Spanish orEngUsh. The core is covered in the 
first fiart and flie field of concentration in the second. The 
comprehensive examination is given twice a year, toward the 
end of each semester. 
Course Requirements 

Core Courses (21 credit hours) 

• SPAN-705 Sertanar in Spanish and Latin American 

Studies (3) 

• One course in Latin American Uterature and culture fiom the 
following 

SPAN-554 Classics of Latin American Literature (3) 
SPAN-656 Spanish Topics (3) (topic emphasi?ing literature 

or culture) 
SPAN-705 Serrinar in Spanish and I^tin American Studies 

(3) (topic emphasizing Uterature or culture) 

• One course from the following: 

SPAN-656 Spanish Topics (approved language-related tc^ic) 

SPAN-658 Introduction to Spanish Translation (3) 
SPAN-661 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 

• One course in Latin Amaican history, politics, international 
relations, or economics fiom the following: 

GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Sdected 

Regions (3) (Latin American topics) 
mST-^O Latin American Studies (3) 
SIS-577 International Relations of Latin America (3) 
or ottier qsproved course 

• Two electives from Spaiush: l^atin American offerings in the 
Department ofLanguage and Foreign Studies 

• Elective (3) 

Field of Concentration (12 credit hours) 

• Students construct a field of conc«itration, in consultation 
with an advisor; in one of the following areas: 

Related sludies(e.g., economics, history, intenational studies, 
comniunication, public affairs) 
Literature and culture 
Language teaching 



Language and Foreign Studies 141 



Linguistics, language, and translation (Students can also 
complete a Graduate Certilicatc in Spanish Translatioa) 
Co-ops and internships are encouraged and are ncrmally 
credited within the field of concentration. They are usually 
taken passTail and can be done either locally (throu^ 
SPAN-691 Proyecto AmistaJ) or abroad. A maximum of 3 
credit hours of co-op or internship can be applied to the 
degree. 
Note: Study abroad opportunities are available. Participants may 
earn up to 9 approved graduate credit hours abroad. These credit 
houis can be appUed ei&er to the core or ttie field of concentraticn 
(or both), as appropriate aid as approved by an advisor. 

Graduate Certificate in Translation 

Students receive a Graduate Certificate in French, Russian, 
or Spani^ by conpleting 15 credit hours of course wwk ac- 
conSng to the required sequence forthe particular language. All 
courses taken in the Department of Language and Foreigo 
Studies toward the certificate may be used by graduate students 
toward the master's degree in the same language. 

The empfaasis of this program is on translation into English. 
This certificate program provides students with an academic 
groindingin translation theory and practice. Students interested in 
obtaining further translation oedentials are encouraged to discuss 
their options with the appropriate language advisor 

For core courses to count towajd the certificate, students mist 
receive a grade of B or better. For non-core courses, students com- 
plete an additional translation project be>ond fee normal course 
requirements and mist receive a satisfectory evaluation for their 
project Studeds wiD only be pemitted to do these translation 
projects after having conpleted at least one of the first t\M3 core 
comses. Students rauS have an overall 3 .00 gradb point average in 
certificate couraes in older to be awarded the certificate . 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students who have a bachelor's degree. If flie under- 
graduate degree is not in Ae language £>r which ftiey wish to 
obtain a certificate, students mist have completed the appropri- 
ate 300-level Conversation and Composition II or Advanced H 
language course, or equivalent. Equivalency is determined in 
consultation with the faculty advisor. Students whose native 
language is not English tiiist meet univo^ity requirements for 
En^ish competency (miniiinim TOEFL score of 600). Before 
commencing fbe program, students should consult the appiDpri- 
ate advisor in the Department of Language andForagn Studies 
to pian their program of study. 



French Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements (IS credit hours) 

Core 

• FREN-628 French Trarelatioa Ccncepts and Practice (3) 

• FREN-629 Fiencii Translation VAjrkshap (3) 

• One ofthe following: 

FREN-627 Le Frangais Commercial (3) 
FREN-630 Syntaxe et Style du Frani^ (3) 
FREN-665 Les Registres du Franqais (3) 
Electives 

• Two courses selected finm the other courses on the core 
course Ust or fitjm ofierings in French at ttie 500 level or 
above. 

Russian Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements (15 credit hours) 

Core Courses 

• RUSS-64 1 Russian Media and Political Translation (3) 

• RUSS-643 Russian Business Translation (3) 

• One ofthe following: 

RUSS-546 Russian Advanced Grammar and 

Composition I (3) 
RUSS-547 Russian Advanced Grammar and 
Oorr^xDsition n (3) 
Elective Courses 

• Two courses may include the other couse on the core course 
list or be selected fiwmofferings in Rusian at the 500 level or 
above. 

Spanish Translation Certificate 

Course Requirements (15 credit hours) 

Core 

• SPAN-658 htroduction to Spanish Translation (3) 

• SPAN-659 Advanced Spanidi Translation (3) 

• One ofthe following: 

SPAN-656 Spanish Topics (approved language-related 

topic) 
SPAN-661 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3) 
Electives 

• Two courses selected from the other core courses or from 
oflferings in Spanish at the 500 level or above. 



142 CoUege of Arls and Sciences 

Liberal Studies 



B.A. in Liberal Studies 



This program is desigi^ for students eight years or more 
out of high school who seek a flexible degree program that en- 
courages them to hringtogetiier their personal and professional 
goals in the designof their academic mqor. The major encour- 
ages students to combine Uberal arts studies with a speciaUza- 
tioa SpecializatioDs are available in any of ftie minors offered 
by American University. 
Admission to the Program 

After admission, students submit a written proposal stating 
their core interests, along with a 300-word essay explaining 
their goals and the relationship among diosen areas and 
couises 
University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit homs 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college matheinatics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation comse 
and one second-level comse from each ofthe five curricular 
areas in an approved sequence 

• No more than 6 credit hours inay be taken in the same 
discpline 

Major Requirements 

• 42-48 credit hours with grades of Cor better 

The majorconsists of a 24credit hourcore area and an 1 8-24 
credit hour speciali2atioii, both of which offer a nuni)er of 
structured alternative choices. 
Core Area 

• 24 credit houis chosen fiom fields of study in one of three 
core areas the humanities, the social sciences, or sdences/ 
mathematics. 

The core area must include course woik in fcur fields of 
study. 6 credit hours are to be taken in each field; at least 3 
credit hours in each of &e four fields rraist be earned in a 
comse at the 300 level or hi^er. For students taking flie 
Scioices/Matbematics core, a ninimim of 6 credit hours in 
total must be taken iq courses at the 300 level or hi^er. No 
more than three courses taken for General Education credit 
may also count toward core area requirements. Six of ttie 
eight courses taken to fiilfiU the core area mist be offered by 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 



Fields of Study by Core Area 
Humanities 

Art 

Art History 

Foreign Language 

Jewish Studies 

Literature 

Perfomiing Arts 

Philosophy 

Religim 



Social Sciences 

American Studies 

Anthropology 

Comnunication 

(designated courses) * 
Economics 
Education 

(designated courses) * 
History 

Political Science 
Psychology 

(designated courses) • 
Sociology 



Sdences/Mathematics 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Computer Sdence 

Information Systems 

Mathematics 

Physics 

P^chology 
(desigiBted courses)* 

Statistics 
* Designated courses: academic counselors will provide students 
with a list of appioved courses. 
Specialization 

In addition to fiie core area courses, students in the Badielor 
of Arts in liberal Studies pnDgram are required to complete 
1 8-24 credit houis in a specialization diosen ftomflie list ofuni- 
versity -approved minors. Note: if ftie minor taken fijrthe spedal- 
ization requires 24 or more credit hours, students may request 
reducing their core requirements fixjm 24 to 21 credit hours. 
However, the core must still include at least 18 credit hours of- 
faed by the College of Arts and Sdences. 

Students may select a specialization that conplements flieir 
core area, or they may choose a spedaUi^ation that is anew area 
of study. In all cases the student is encouraged to design a core 
area and a speciaUzation that reflects the student's particular in- 
terests and goals. 

Requirements for the speciaUzation in &e Bachelor of Arts in 
Liberal Studies degree are met when a student completes flie re- 
quirements fijr a minor approved for the program No more than 
two courses taken for General Education ciedit may be applied 
to a student's spedaliation. See Fields of Study in the Under- 
graduate Study cheq3ter for a list of university mLoors currently 
approved fortius program. 



Literature 



Lileratue 143 



Ch«r Charles R. Laison 

FuB-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritis/a P. Han, J.J. Jotgens, F. L. Kelly, 

E.L. Kesder, F H. King, J.N. Radner, J A Roberts, 

H.S. Taybr, F. Turq, F.E Zapatka 

Distinguished Professor B.T. Bennett 

Professor C.R Larson, J. Loesbag, R McCann, 

K W. Moyer, K Mussell, R. Rubenstein, M. Sklarew 

Associate Prrfessor Emeritus A.E Bean, WE. Stdir 

Associate Professw K Leaiard, M. Noble, 

D.C. Payne Fidi, D. Pike, R. Sha 

Asastant Professor E. Levy, M. Meoon, 

J. Ivfiddeits, A. Shmnan, M. Sulak, M. \\fenthe 

Visiting Assistant n^fessor A. Bory, E Dussere, D. 

Mahchuk, T. McGann, E PoKner 

Ficlion Writer in Residence D. Orenstein 

Instructor C. Bair \to Dam, C. Cox, R. Drumtiond, 

J Elderidn, A. Harbin, L. Johnson, P. Joyner, J. McCarthy, 

Q MooHBu, V. Murphy, R. Noble, P. Reichlei; 

A. Tamadiasky, K. Wilscm, L. Wootton Eton 

Concerned wifti the study oflileiature, writing, and film, the 
Department ofLiterature offeis courses ttiat enfcrace many af>- 
proaches to the rich heritage of written, oral, and cinemstic tia- 
diticm, as well as courses that challenge students to write 
cre^velyandprotessionally. In addition to taking courses, our 
students are encouraged to enroll in intemsh^ to sam{de ca- 
reeis that use the skills 4iey are developing in the classroom; 
Wadiington affords a wide range of job opportunities (many in- 
volving writing or editing) in settings sudi as arts oiganizations, 
radio and television, govanmant offices, public interest organi- 
zations, miseums, schools, and community groups. 

The departmeid's faculty of scfaolais and writers slafif three 
degree programs in literature: the B.A. and M.A. in Literature 
arjd the M.FA in Qeative ^^ting All three programs oflFer 
students ftie chance to study literature, film, cntician and cre- 
ative writing; all are small and flexible progranB that bring stu- 
dents and faculty into close contact in snail classes and 
informal gatherings and ooUoquia The MA. program jho vides 
an overview of the literary history of our culture in addition to a 
series of seminars on fiieoretical tc^cs in which students and 
faculty together consider what constitutes ttie discqjline of liter- 
ary aiticisn. The MF.A in Creative Writing program includes 
woric in fiction, poetry, aai oeativenonfictioD; workshops witti 
distingiii^ied visiting writers; intemshqB; and coirse vjork in 
literature and in the arts of translatian and literary joumahan. It 
also offers students ojjportunities to give public readings, to 
meet witti editors and publishers, and to produce a nationally 
known literary magazine. 

In additioD, the department offers an interdisciplinary rrrinor 
in Cinema Studies which combines course work in dnema, 



video criticism and history and takes advantage of ttte impres- 
sive film resources of the Wadiingtwi area. 
The Visiting Writers Series 

Each setTESter; the department sporsors public readings by 
prominenl poets, fiction writers, and editors These visitors also 
corxluct woric^ops for graduate and undergraduate creative 
writing students. Visiting writers have included Mark Doty, 
Allan Gurgarrus, Tillie Olsen, Andrew Holleran, Hannan 
al-Shaykh, A.J. Verdelle, Ridiard Selzer, Richard Rodriguez, 
Yusef Kcsnunyakaa, Marie Howe, Michael Cxmningham, Mari- 
lyn Nelson, Li-Yomg Lee, Anry Hoom, and Marril SurL Dis- 
tinguished Writers in Residence have included Jean Valartine, 
Marilyn Hacker, Jon Silkin, Pablo Medina, and Alice 
McDenrBtt. 

B.A. in Literature 

Admission to the Program 

Fomal admission to the major requires a grade point aver- 
age of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental appaoval 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 ca-edit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college matherrBtics or ttie equivalent by 
examination 

G«iieral Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencourses,oonsistingofonefoundationcourseand 
one second-level course in an approved secpience from each 
of the five orrricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requremeots 

• 42 credit hours with ^des of C or better, with at least 21 
credit horrrs at the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• Ln-105/LIT-105G The Litaary hnaginaticm 1 ; 1 (3) 
or 

LJT-120/Lrr-120GhiteriHeting Literature 1:1 (3) 

• IJT-480Sa]iorRDJed in Literature (3) 

• IJT-498 Senior SemirBr on the Wue ofLiterature (3) 

• Three survey courses from flie fi^ wing with at least one of 
Lrr-210orLrr-220: 

LIT-150/Lrr-150GThird\M)rldLiterature3:l (3) 
LrT-210 Survey of American Literature I (3) 

IJT-211 Survey of American Literature n (3) 
IJT-220 Survey of British literature I (3) 
IJT-221 Survey of British literature H (3) 
LIT-225/Lrr-225G The Afiican Writa 1 :2 (3) 
IJT-235/Lrr-235G Afiican-American Literature 2: 2 (3) 



144 College of Arts and Sciences 



LIT-240/1JT-240G Asian Amaican Literature 2:2 (3) 

• Four coinses in literature written before 1900, of which at 
least two niist be in literature writtm be£ire 1800 

• One of the following 

LIT-21 5/Lrr-215G Wntets in FttntAm Person 1:2 
creative writing course 
300-level cinema course 

• Three additional courses offered or approved by the 
Department ofLiteiature 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have ttie oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honore in the major To tul- 
fifl Honors requirements for University Honors in Literature, 
students may enroll in Literature Honors CoUoquia with liter- 
aiy topics, or may arrange an Honors supploneit to a regular 
course or an Honors independent study in Literature. All stu- 
dents complete a two-semester Honors sequence in Senior 
SaTuur and Senior Honors Thesis. The department's Honors 
coordinator advises students in the University Honors ftogram 
regarding departnental options. 

Minor in Literature 

• 18 credit hours with grades of C cr better and at least 12 
credit hours unique to the miner 

Course Requirements 

• Lrr-lOS/Lrr-lOSGIlieLiteraiylmagination 1:1 (3) cr 
LIT-120/LIT-120G hterpretingLitaature 1:1 (3) 

• One course from the following: 

LIT-1 50/Lrr-l 50G Thinl World Literature 3 : 1 (3) 
LIT-21 Survey of American Literature 1(3) 
Lrr-21 1 Survey of American Literature II (3) 
Lrr-220 Survey of British Literature I (3) 
LIT-221 Survey o f British Literature n (3) 
LIT-225/LIT-225G'nie African Writer 1:2 (3) 
LIT-235/IJT-2350 African-Americai Literatire 2:2 (3) 
LIT-240/LIT-240G Asian American Literature 2:2 (3) 

• 1 2 credit hours in liteiatiue; at least 9 credit hours must be at 
the 300 level or above. Only one course in creative writing 
and one course in film may be counted toward the minor, or 
if no creative writing course is used, two film courses may 
be counted. 

Minor in Literature: Cinema Studies 

• 24 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 12 
credit hours unique to the miner 

Course Requirements 

• COMM-105/OOMM-105G Visual Literacy 1:1(3) 

• LIT-135/LIT-135G Critical Approach to tte Cinana 1:1 (3) 

• 12 credit hours from the following: 

LIT-346 Topics in Film (3) may be repeated up to four 
times wi4idi£ferent topics 



LIT-402 Oeative Writing FihnScrpt (3) 

• 6 credit hours from ttie from the following; 
COMM-330 Principles ofPhotogrEphy (3) and 

COMM-331 Fihn and Video Production I (3) 
COMM-511 History of Documentaiy (3) 
COMM-51 2 Social Documentary (3) 
COMM-51 7 Kstory of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 History of Animation (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
COMM-586 History of Czech Cinema (3) (study abroad) 

Combined B.A. and M.A. in Literature 

The program enables students to oonplete both the B. A. and 
the MA in Literature in five years of fidl-tine study. 

Admission to the Program 

Undergraduate hterature mqors ordinarily apply at the end of 
their junior >ear, but they should consult wifli the M.A. program 
director prior to applying. Admission decisioos foUow flie proce- 
dires used to evaluate graduate appUcants to the MA. in Litera- 
ture. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required. 
Students will be admitted formally to MA. status only if they 
have conpleted all requirements for the B. A in Literature with 
at least an overall 3.00 grade point average and a 3.20 grade point 
average in literature courses. 

Requircmmts 

• All requirements for the B.A. in Litaature 

• Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours of approved 
500-level course work in literature to satisfy the requirements 
of both degrees 

• All requirements for the M.A in Litwature, including a 
minimum of 24 credit hours corrpleted in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. 

M.A. in Literature 

Admission to the Program 

hi addition to meeting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, applicants should have a grade point average 
of 3.00 (on a4.00 scale) in undergraduate literature courses. The 
Graduate Record General Exairdnatian is required. An under- 
graduate mq'or in literature is desirable, but applications from 
candidates who have majored in other fields will also be coiBid- 
eied, provided that substantial study of hterature has been done. 
Two letters of recommendation and a sairqie of critical writing 
are required. Part-time as wdl as fiill-time students are welcome 
inttie program. 

Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work with at least 18 
credit hours in 500- or 700-level courses 

• A written comprehensive examination based primarily on 
hterature taught in M. A. seminas andother literaturecourss 



Mathematics and Statistics 145 



Course Requirements 

• 6 credit hours Irom the following 
LIT-521 Readings in Genre; Poetry (3) 
IJT-522 Reading in Genre; Drama (3) 
LIT-523 Readings in Genre; Nowl (3) 

• 21 graduate credit hours in Uterature, with at least 9 credit 
hours at the 700 level 

Teaching 

• IJT-730 Teaching of \Witing (3) 

• IJT-731 Teaching of Writing Practicum (3) 

• an approved graduate course in literature, education, 
linguistics, or anttiropdogy (3) 

Pre-doctoral 

• 1X1-732 Literary Theory (3) 
and 

LIT-793 Directed Research in Literature (3)plusanotbBr 700 
level course in literatiie 
or 

lJT-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (6) 
or 

6 credit hours in Uterature at the 700 level 
General 

• 9 additional graduate credit hours in literatue 

Interdisciplinary 

• 9 graduate credit hours in aiwther department or 
departnents, in a individually -designed program of study as 
approved by the MA. program director 

M.F.A. in Creative Writing 

Admission to the Program 

Apidicants must meet the miiiinium university requiremaits 
for graduate study. An undergraduate mEyor in literature is de- 
siraWe, but applications fiom candidates who have majored in 
otha' fields will be considered AdmissiaD is based on samples 



of previous writing (30 pages of fiction or 1 5 pages of poetry), 
academic record, and two letters of recorrmendation. 
Degree Requirements 

• 48 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• Advancement to candidacy is automatic on admission to the 
program, but subject to yearly review 

• A book-length manuschpt of fiction, poetry, or drama, to be 
approved by the creative writing faculty 

• One oral examination on the candidate's maiBiscript; its 
rrerits, characteristics, and relations to the \wrks of others 

Course Requirements 

• 12 credit hours in writing workshops; 
Lrr-700 Advanced Fiction Workshop (3) 
lJT-701 Advanced Poetry WorkAop (3) 
LIT-702 Creative Writing; Film Script (3) 

Students may concentFate on one genie or work in several 

• 12credit hours in literature courses selected fiom among the 
regular graduate level literature offerings of the department 

• Lrr-705 Seminar on Translation (3) 

• Lrr-710 Art of Literary Jounalian (3) 

• LlT-691 Graduate Intansh^ (6) 

Possible internship sites include the Writer's Center in 
Bethesda, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Library of 
Congress, the Writers-in-the-Schools programs, and 
afilliations with in-house and trade publishers. 

• 6 credit hours fittn the following 

Additional writing workshops, offered at American 

University or elsewhra^ 

Addifional courses in literature, cinema studies, or 

performing arts 

\^^hthe approval ofanadvisor, courses in foreign languages, 

journalism, or in aiy ofcer discipline which seems germane to 

the individual student's interest and consistent with the 

objectives of the program 

• 6 credit hous ofLrT-797 Master's Thesis Seminar 



Mathematics and Statistics 



Char Jefi&ey Hakim 
FuO-time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus D.S. Crosby, R. A. Hobsager; 

BP. Korii, H. M. RosenWatt, S.H. Schot 

Professor S. Casey, A. Enayat, MW. Gray, J. H£idm,R.W. 
Jemigan, D. Kalman, J. Nolan 

Associate Professor Emeritus A.M Barron, L.J. Crone, 
E.B. McCue 

Associate Professor IL. Chang, V. E. StalHngs, F.\to Dyke 

Asastant Professor Emerita C.T Machlin 



Assistant Professor A. Elezi, M. Jadcson, J. Lansky, L. Liu, 

J. Lu, E. MaUoy, E. Valaifis 

Instructor J. Anderson, 1. IzmirU, W. Sharabati, F. Gavilanez 

Mafliematics may be studied as an intellectual discipline for 
its own sake or as a pro fessional tool for application to the prob- 
lems of oflier discifdines Majors in mattiematics receive finn 
grounding in the theory and techniques of alg^n°a, analysis, aird 
other fields as a basis for fiirtho' woric in pure or apiplied mathe- 
matics and fcfT graciiate studies. The major in apjdied imtlie- 
matics offers training in mathematical problem-solving 
techniques witti a reduced errphaas on abstract ttieory This 
program is not as firm a foundation for graduate work as the 



146 CoUege of Arts and Sciences 



mathematics major, but is tailored to the student who will need 
to apply mathematical, statistical, and conputer me&ods to 
practical problems. Undergraduates majoring in mathematics 
may choose to take a second major in secondary school teadi- 
ing. 

Statistics is concerned with the collection, organization, 
analysis, interpretation, and presentation of nurrerical data. 
The science of statistics is a broad and challenging field. Its 
breadth can be seen in the way its ideas and techniques have 
found appUcation in alrtwst every field of study. Statistics has 
contributed arganizaticGal and analytical tediniques that pro- 
vide new insghts in fields that range fitim the physical and Ufe 
sciences to business, law, history, literature, and the social sci- 
ences. 

Undergraduate students majoring in statistics have two 
tracks available. Those who intend to continue with ffadwte 
work in statistics cr those with an interest in the ttieory of sta- 
tistical methods should follow ttie sequence for mathanatical 
statistics, which requires a strong background in nBthematics. 
Students willing an orqihasis in the use of statistical tech- 
niques should follow fee sequence for applied statistics. This 
track is especially qjpropriate as a secondary emphasis for stu- 
dents who have a strong intaest in a field of applicaticD. 

The Dq)artment of Ma&ematics and Statistics comttnes 
the resources and knowledge of fliese related discjpliaes. This 
enables the department to oSer unusually varied and flexiWe 
programs. A studait with an interest in the matttematical sci- 
ences may choose a program wiftiin the departnBnt and later 
change his or her emphasis without a great loss o f time because 
the programs ^are a common core. 

The university's Washington, D.C. location affords the stu- 
doit access to many governmental, cultural, scientific, and his- 
torical institutions. These institutions serve as an important 
research resource. In addition, they are a source of fiil-tiine 
and part-time errployment opportunities for students with a 
firm grounding in the mathexnatical sciences. 

B.S. in Applied Mathematics 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 200 (on a 4.00 scale) find departmental ap- 
jaoval. 

University Requirements 

• Atotal of 120 credit houre 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examinatiDn 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, ccnsisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence fixxn 
each of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
disc^line 



Majo r Requirements 

• 57 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• CSC-280 hihxxiuction to Computer ScierKe I (4) 

• CSC-281 Introduction to Computer Science II (3) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-222Calcul\Bn(4) 

• MATH-3 13 Calculus in (4) 

• MATH-3 10 Lirear Algebra (3) 

• MATH-3 21 Differential Equations (3) 

• MATH-501 Probability (3) 

• MATH-550 Complex Analysis (3) 

• MATH-551 Partial Differential Equations (3) 

• MATH-560 Numerical Analyas: Basic ftoblems (3) 

• STAT-502 hitroduction to Mathematical Statistics (3) 

• Three additional mathematics electives, to be selected in 
consultation with the student's advisor 

Related Courses 

• PHYS-1 10/PHYS-l lOG Uiiversity Physics I 5:1 (4) 

• PHYS-210/PHYS-210G Uiiversity Phyacsn5;2 (4) 
or alternative science courses approved by advisor 

University Honors Program 

Students in the Univeraty Honors Program have fee opportu- 
nity to graduate with University Honors in flie major. To do so, 
students coinplete 1 2 hours of advanced-level Honors work in 
the department and, upon departmental recommendation, gradu- 
ate with University Pfonors in the major. The department's 
Honors coordinator advises students in the University Hcnors 
Program regarding departmental options. 

B.S. in Mathematics 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to the m^or requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental ap- 
proval. 

Students who wi^ to obtain credentials for teacjiing grade 
7-1 2 mathematics may take a 36-CTedit hour secxnd major. Stu- 
doits imst have a 3.00 grade poiitf average to be admitted to the 
second major in secondary education For information co admis- 
sion arxl program requirements, see fee School of Education, 
Teaching and Health secondary education programs. 

University Requirements 

• A total ofl20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or fee equivalent by 
examination 



Mathematics and Statistics 147 



General Education Requirements 

• Atotalof tencoui^s, cunsisling of one tbundationcoinse and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 52 credit hours with grades of C or better 

Students who elect a second major in secondary school 
nsthematics teaching take a total of S3 credit hours for the 
matheraatics major (see course requirements bebw) 
Course Requirements 

• CSC -280 Irtroductionto Computer Sdencel (4) 

• MATH-221 Cakailus 1 (4) 

• MATH-222Calculusn(4) 

• MATH-3 1 3 Cakulus m (4) 

• MATH-3 10 Linear Algebra (3) 

• MATH-SOO Advanced Calculus (3) 

• MATH-S 1 2 Introduction to Modem Algebia I (3) 

• MATH-S 1 3 Introduction to Modem Algebra 11 (3) 

• MATH-S20 Introduction to Analysis I (3) 

• MATH-S21 Introduction to Analysis 11(3) 

• Three courses selected fixmi the following: 
MATH-3 21 Differential Equations (3) 
MATH-SOl Probability (3) 
MATH-SOS Mattematical Logic (3) 

MATH-S08 Automata, Languages and Conpulability (3) 

MATH-5 10 Geometry (3) 

MATH-S 1 S Nuiriber Theory (3) 

MATH-S40 Topology (3) 

MATH-S 50 Conplex Analysis (3) 

MATH-SSI Partial Differertial Equatbns (3) 

MATH-5 60 NuTTBrical Analysis: Basic Problems (3) 

MATH-S 70 History ofMattiematics (3) 

MArH-601 Harmonic Analysis (3) 

SrAT-502 htroduction to Mathematical Ststistics (3) 

• Three courses in a field of application, to be selected in 
consultation with the advisor This requiremmt may be 
waived for students with more than one major in this 
departnrEnt. 

Mathematics Majors with a Second Major in 
Secondary Education 
Course Requirements 

• CSC-280IntroductiontoConq)Uter Sdencel (4) 

• MATH-221 Cakailus 1(4) 

• MArH-222Cakulusn(4) 

• MArH-3 1 3 Calculus HI (4) 

• MArH-3 10 Linear Algebra (3) 

• MATH-500 Advanced Calculus (3) 



• MATH-501Probabihty(3) 

• MATH-5 10 Geometry (3) 

• MATH-5 12 hitroduction to Modem Algebra I (3) 

• MATH-S8S Mathematics Education (3) 

• CTAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• SrAT-S02 Introduction to Mathematical Strtistics (3) 

• Two courses selected from the fdlowing: 
MATH-3 21 Differential Equations (3) 
MATH-SOS Mattematical Logic (3) 
MATH-5 1 5 Nutrfjer Theoiy (3) 
MATH-540 Topology (3) 

MATH-5 SO Complex Analysis (3) 
MATH-5 51 Partial Differential Equatbns (3) 
MATH-5 60 Numerical Analysis: Basic Problems (3) 
MATH-570 History ofMathematics (3) 
MATH-601 Haraaonic Analysis (3) 

• Two courses in a field of ap{dication, to be selected in 
consultation wifli the advisor This requirement may be 
waived for students with more than one major in this 
department 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors ftogram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with LMvasity Honors in the major. To do 
so, students conqjlete 12 hours of advanced-level Ifonors woik 
in the department and, iqxsn departmental recommendation, 
gradiate with Univasity Honors in the riBJor The department ^ 
HoHjrs coordinator advises students in ttie Ltaiversity Honors 
Program regarding departmerial options 

B.S. in Statistics 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to ttie major requires a cumilative grade 
point avoage of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and departmental ap- 
proval. 
Tracks 

Ma&etnatical Statistics and A{^ed Statistics 
University Requiremeots 

• Atotalofl20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hoiffs of college nBthematics or fiie equivalent by 
examiiBtion 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloften courses, consisting ofonefoimdation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the sans 
discipline 

Major Requrements 

• Mathematica] Statistics: 47 credit hoirs with grades of C or 
better 



1 48 Colle ge of Arts and Sciences 



• ApjJied Statistics: 54-55 credit hours with grades of Cor 
bettff 

Course Requirements 
Mathematical Statistics 

• CSC-280hitroduction to Conner Science I (4) 

• MArH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• MArH-222 Calculus n (4) 

• MArH-3 13 Calculus ni (4) 

• MATH-BIO Linear Algebra (3) 

• MAIH-SOl Probability (3) 

• STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• STAr-502 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3) 

• STAr-515 Regression (3) 

• STAT-S 1 6 Design of Experiments (3) 

• Fouradditionalcoureesatorabove300inthed^)artment,of 
which two must have the pefix STAT- (STXF-Sl 4 cannotbe 
used and SrAT-300 and SrAr-302 cannot both be used) as 
approved by an advisor. CSC-281 may substitute for a 
course wifli a prefix of MATH- 

Applied Statistics 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Corr^juter Science I (4) 

• MArH-211 AppKed Calculus 1(4) onrf 
MArH-212 AppUed Calculus D (3) 

or 

MATH-221 CalculiB 1 (4) and 

MArH-222 Calculus H (4) 

• MArH-310Lii»ar Algebra (3) 

• MAFH-SOl Probability (3) 

• STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• STAT-300 Business and Bconamic Statistics (3) 
or 

STAr-302 Intennediate Statistics (3) 

• STAr-502 Intrcduction to Mathematical Statistics (3) 

• STAr-515 Regression (3) 

• STAT-S 1 6 Design of Experiments (3) 

• Two additional courses selected fiom the departrtBnt as 
approved by a studait's advisor 

• At least five additional courses in a related field, as approved 
by an advisor. The courses may be selected fitm more than 
one teaching unit, but must have a cocmncHi therre or subject 
area in which statistics are apfiied. 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have the oppor- 
tmity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students corrqJete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors woric 
in the department and, upon departmental reconmendation, 
giaduate with University Honors in fee major. The depart- 
ment's Honors coordinator advises students in the University 
Honors Program regarding departmental options. 



Special Opportunities 

• The department employs undergraduates in its tutoring lab and 
the computer labs. 

• The department offers a UmitBd numbo- of undergraduate 
book scholarships. 

Minor in Mathematics 

• 19 credit hours with grades of Cor better and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• MATH-3 10 Lirear Algebra (3) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) and 
MATH-222 Calculus H (4) 

or 

MATH-2 11 Apphed Calculus I (4) and 

MATH-2 12 AppUed Calcuhis n (3) 

• Three additional courses numbered MATH-3 13 or above or 
STAr-202 or above, with at least two courses at ttie 300 level or 
above 

Minor in Quantitative Methods 

• 20 aedit hours with grades of C or better and with at least 12 
credit hours unique to die irdnor 

Course Requirements 

• CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Science I (4) 

• MATH-3 10 Lirear Algebra (3) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) and 
MATH-222 Calculus H (4) 

or 

MATH-211 AppUed Calculus I (4) and 

MATH-2 12 AppUed Calculus n (3) 

• Two courses in statistics iHimbered STAT-3xx or above; 
Students may select only one of STAT-300 Business and 
Economic Statistics, STAr-302 Intermediate Statistics, or 
STAT-S 1 4 Statistical Methods for credit toward the minor. 

Minor in Statistics 

• 20 credit hours with grades ofC or better and at least 12 credit 
houis unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• MAra-221 Calculus I (4) or 
MATH-211 AppUed Calculus I (4) 

• STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• Four courses in statistics (STAT-xxx) at the 300 level or above 
(MAFH-SO 1 ProbabiUty may also be used as one of the four) 
Students may select only one of STAT-300 Business and 
Economic Statistics, STAT-302 Intermediate Statistics, or 
STAT-S 1 4 Statistical MetKxls for credit toward the minor. 



Mattaemadcs and Statistics 149 



Undergraduate Certificate in 

Applied Statistics 

Admission to the Program 

Optn to undeigraduate degree and nondegree students. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 18 credit hours of approved course weak witti at least 9 credit 
hours at ftie 300-level or above, with grades of C or better. 
Qrades of C- or D in certificate program comses are not 
accepted toward the fiiUillment of certificate requiranents, 
atthou^ these grades will be included in ttie calculation o f the 
GPA. Studoits irust have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs mist take a miniinim of 6 credit horns 
during each 1 2-mDnth period and complete the certificate in 
fixir years. International students must enroll in 12 credit 
bours each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 
credit hours earned at an accredited college or university may 
be apfiied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• CSC-280InliDductiontoConq>uter Science (4) 

• MATH-2 11 AR)lied Calculus I (4) 

• MATH-212AR)lied Calculus n (3) 

• SrAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• SrAT-300 Business and Economic Statistics (3) 
or 

SrAr-302 fateimediate Statistics (3) 

or 

SrAT-514 Statistical Me&ods (3) 

Combined B.S. in Applied Mathematics 
and M.A. in Mathematics 

This pro gram enables students to eam botti a B.S. in Af^Hed 
Ma&ematics and an M.A in Mathematics. 
Requirements 

• An requirements for the B.S. in Applied Mathematics 
Lhdergraduate students may ap^ly 6 credit hoursof approved 
500-level course woric to satisfy the requirements of botti 



• AH requirements for fte MA. in Ma&ematics, inchiding a 
miniimm of 24 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has beai 
awarded. 

Combined B.S. in Mathematics and 
M.A. in Mathematics 

This program aiables students to earn both a B.S. inMafce- 
matics and an M.A. in MathenBtics. 
Admission to Program 

Undergraduate students ^ould apjiy by the end of the ju- 
nior year. Students should have a minimum grade point average 



of 3.20 in major courses and have completed tme of fee follow- 
ing sequoices: 

MATH-5 12 Introduction to Modem Algebra I and 

MATH-5 13 Introduction to Modem Algebra II 
or 

MAra-520 IntroductiDn to Analysis I and MAITt521 
Irtroductionto Analysis II 
Requirements 

• AH retpiirements for the B.S. in Maflianatics 
Undergraduate students may a j^ly 6 credit hoursof approved 
500-level course work to satisfy the requirements of boft 
degrees. 

• All requirements for ttie MA. in Mafcematics, including a 
rcrinumun of 24 credit hours compieted in residence in 
graduate status after the undeigraduate degree has beai 
awarded. 

Combined B.S. in Mathematics or 
Statistics and M.S. in Statistics 

Students receive both a B.S. in Mathematics or Statistics and 
an MS. in StatisticsL 

Admission to the Program 

Intaested students should apjiy by the end of flieir junior 
year Applicaiis should have a mininiim grade point average of 
3.20innBJorooursesandcompleteMAIH-501 Probability and 
STAr-502 Introduction to Maftiematical Statistics by the end of 
the junior year 

Requirements 

• All retjiirements for flie B.S. in Mathematics or Statistics 
(mathanatical statistics trade) 

Ltadergraduate studentsmayapply 6 credit hoursof approved 
500-level course work to satisfy the requirements of bofti 



• All requirements for Hne MS. in Mafcematics, including a 
minimum of 24 Credit hours oom{deted in residence in 
graduate status after the undeigraduate degree has been 
awarded. 

Combined B.S. in Mathematics and 
M.S. in Computer Science 

Admission to the Program 

Adnission is open to undergraduate matbematics majors 
with a minimum grade point average of 3.20. App^cants must 
have conpleted the following by the end of tbe junior year: 

CSC-280 Introduction to Computer Sciaice I 

CSC-28 1 Introduction to Computer Science 11 

CSC-520 Algwithms and Data Structures 

Requirements 

• All requirements for the B.S. in Mathonatics 



1 50 Coflege of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours of 
approved 500-level course woik to satisfy the lequiiements 
of bothdegreea 

• All requirements for the M.S. in Computer Science, 
including a rrrinirnum of 24 credit hours completed in 
residence in graduate status after the undergraduate degiee 
has been awarded. 

M.A. in Mathematics 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the unnimum university require- 
ments fi)r admission, qipUcants must have an undergraduate 
degree in methematics or a related field Graduate Record Ex- 
amination (GKE) scores are required. Students entering Sie 
MA. program without the appxjpriate background wiD be ex- 
pected to take certain undergraduate courses as prerequisite 
woik. 

Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate course woric including 
thesis or nonthesis option requirements 

• ToolofresearckproficiencyinRusaan,German,French,or 
an approved conqjuter language 

• Written comprdiensive examination in mathematics 

• Research requirment; 

Thesis option: MArH-797 Master's Thesis Seminar in 
Mathematics (6) and an oral defense of the thesis 
Nonthesis option: MATH-690 Independent Study Project in 
Mathematics (3) (topic to be chosen in consultation with a 
faculty member) requiring an oral and written presentation 
of the researdi work and 3 credit hours in approved 
graduate-level independent research, seninai; or research 
course. 

All course woik for the fliesis or nonthesis option mist be 
corndeted with grades ofB or better 

M.S. in Statistics 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments br graduate study, applicants will be expected to have 
an adequate background in ttie mathenBtical sciences. Gradu- 
ate Record Examination (GRE) scores are required. Students 
entering the MS . program without the appropriate background 
will be expected to take certain undergraduate courses as pre- 
requisite work. 

Degree Requiranents 

• 30-33 credit hours of approved graduate work 

• ToolofreaearchproficiencyinFrendi,German,Russian,an 
approved computer language, or an af^sroved analytical skill 
such as numerical, oompkx, or real analysis 

• Written comprehenave examination 
Thesis option: Mathematicai Statistics 



Nonthesis option: AppUed Statistics: Statistical Theory and 
Apphcations 

• Research requirement: 

Thesis option: STAT-797 Master's ThesisSeminarinStatistics 
(3-^ requiring a formal written fliesis with an oral defense 
Nonthesis option: STAr-691 hitemship (3) and SIAT-798 
Statistical Research and Consulting (3) with required oral and 
written presentation of tfie research work 
All course woik for the thesis or non&esis option must be 
completed with grades of B or better. 
Course Requirements 

• STAr-515 Regression (3) 

• STAT-524 Data Analysis (3) 

• STAT-525 Statistical Software (3) 

• STAT-530Maftematical Statistics 1(3) 

• STAT-531Mattiematical Statistics n (3) 

• STAr-616Regressionn(3) 

• STAr-691 Internship in Statistics (3) 

Thesis option 

• STAr-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (3-6) 

• Two additional graduate courses in mathanatics or statistical 
theory 

Nonthesis option 

• STAr-510Sun«ySan5)ling(3) 

• STAT-798 Statistical Research and Consulting (3) 

• Two additional graduate oouises in statistical theory, methods, 
and applications, induding approved related courses of&red 
by other departments 

Graduate Certificate in 

Applied Statistics 

Admission to the Program 

Op>en to students with a bachelor 's degree fitnn an acoedited 

institution. 

Certificate Requirements 

• 15 credit hours of approved course work wifli grades of Cor 
better 

Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fixlfiUment of certificate requiremaits, 
althcugh fliese grades will be included in ftie calculation of the 
GR\. Students must have at least a 3.0 GEA in certificate 
couises in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during eadi 12-monlh period and oonplete the certificate in 
four yeara Intematianal students must enroU in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for sumner). A maximum of 3 credit 
houis earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit 



Course Requirements 

• SrAT-530 Mathematical Statistics I (3) 

• SrrAr-531 Mafeematical Statistics II (3) 

• Three of the following 



Mutti-Ethiic Studies 151 

STAI-SIO Theory of Sampling 1(3) 

STAT-Sl 5 Regression (3) 

STAT-Sl 6 Design of lixperimenls (3) 

STAT-Sl? %)ecial Topics in Statistical Methodology (3) 

or 

STAT-Sl 9 Nonparametric Statistics (3) 



Multi-Ethnic Studies 



Coordinator Keith D. Leonard, Department of Literature 
Faculty fit)m other schools and departroaits of the university 
teach in te program 

Multi-Eflnic studies is an interdisciplinary program that of- 
fersa broad course of study ofethnicity in the Lhited States and 
the largerworid. Tomeetthe diallenges and opportunities of di- 
veraty in an increasingly multicultural and multiethnic society, 
the program provides students with an understanding of the rich 
history of ethnic and racial diversity fhjm multiple perspectives. 
The minor and undergraduate certificate help students prepare 
for an increasingly diversified workplace and a globalized 
economy by encouraging them to develop an awarene ss o f and 
appreciation for their ethnic experiences as part of the greater 
human experiaice. 

Minor in Multi-Ethnic Studies 

• IScredithours withgradesofCorbetterwithatleast 12credit 
hours unique to the rrrinor and at least 9credit hours at flie 300 
level or above 

Course Requirements 

• IDIS-210/IDIS-210G Contemporary Multi-Ethnic Voices (3) 

• One of the following: 
GOVT-231 Thiixi Worid Pohtics (3) 

HIST-21 0/HIST-21 OG Etiinicity in America 4 :2 (3 ) 
SOCY-210/SOCY-210G hiequality; Class, Race, 
Ethnicity 4:2 (3) 

• 12 credit hours in three of flie following five areas: Afiican 
and African American, Asian and Asian American, Jewish, 
Latin American and Caribbean, and Middle-Eastern 
Courses should represent a mix of social sciences and the 
humanities. Topics courses, independent study, internship, 
cooperative education, and study abroad must be ^jproved by 
the program coordinator. 



Undergraduate Certificate in 
Multi-Ethnic Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Open to undeigraduate degree and nondegree students. 
Certificate Requirements 

• 18 credit hours of approvedcoursewoikwifli at least 9credit 
hours at the 300-level or above, with grades of C or better. 

• Grades of C- or D in certificate program couises are not 
accepted toward the fiiliiUment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades will be included in thecalculationof the 
GPA. Studmts rmst have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate fiograms mist take a minirmm of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and complete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll ii 12 credit 
hours each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 
credit hours earned at an accredited college or university may 
be appUed toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

Course Requirements 

• IDIS-210/rDIS-210GQ)nternporaryMilti-Elhnic Voices (3) 

• One ofthe following; 
GOVT-231 Thiid World Pditics (3) 
HIST-210/HIST-210Q Ethnicity in AinBrica4:2 (3) 
SOCY-210/SOCY-210G Inequality: Qass, Race, 

Ethnicity 4:2 (3) 

• 12 credit hours in three of fee following five areas: Afiican 
and African American, Asian and Asian American, Jewish, 
Latin American and Caribbean, and Nfiddle-Eastem 
Courses should represent a mix of social sciences and the 
humanities. Topics courses, independent study, internship, 
cooperative education, and study abroad must be aR)roved by 
the advisor. 



152 College of Arts and Sciences 

North American Studies 



Coordnator Robert A Pastor, Director, Center fijr North 
American Studies and Professor, School of htematioaal 
Service 

Eoononiic and social integration has accelerated in North 
America, but policy coordination and awareness of an emerg- 
ing North America have not kept pace. The Center for North 
American Studies (CNAS) at AnHicanUniversily aims to ed- 
ucate a new generation of students from all three coun- 
tries-Canada, Mexico, and the United States-to begin a North 
American journey conparaWe to that begun in Europe five de- 
cades ago. The course wcik examines the diflferences and 
shared diaracteristics of the three naticHis; conpares the North 
American experiment with Europe's; and challenges students 
and faculty to imagine a coiitinental future. 

An undergraduate minor and a graduate certificate are of- 
fered. These intettlisciplinary progrartB are administered by 
the College of Arts andSciences with the support of the School 
of International Service, Sd»ol of PubUc Affaire, School of 
Cormnmication, and the Kogod School of Business. Students 
pursue an experiential corr^wnent, based on study abroad in 
Canada or Mexico and/or an internship relevant to North 
America. Students also need to danonstrate some level of pro- 
ficiency in Spani^ or Irendi- The Center for North American 
Studies hosts Senior Fdlows who teach spedal courses, which 
can satisfy requiiemeiris with the program coordinator's ap- 
proval. 

Minor in North American Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Admisaon to the minor requires a minimum grade point 
average (OPA) of 2.00 and ajqwoval of the program coordirB- 
tor. 

Requirements 

• IS credit hours with grades of C or better and at feast 12 
credit houB unique to the minor 

Students take a core survey course and 15 additional credit 
houre in North American-related course work, iicluding 
study abroad in Canada or Mexico and/or an approved 
internship, with a niinimum2 .5 CffA in courses for the rrrinDr 
overall and a 3.0 GPA in ttre core courses 

• A ninimum of two years of Spanish or French language 
coursesatthe post-secondary level with grades ofB or better, 
or a level of communication competency equivalent to ttie 
entry level for third-year conversation aixi corifxasition, as 
demonstrated by a {dacement score of 421 points in French 
or 440 points in Spanish on the Computer Assisted 
Proficiency Exam (CAPE) adniniaered by the Language 
Resource Center in the Department of Language and 
Foreign Studies (LFS). 



• Preparation of a significart research paper as part of one of the 
core courses or as a reflection on study abroad or approved 
irrtemship 

• Approved study abroad in Canada or Mexico or an irrterrrship 
with a Ncalh Arrerican focus 

Course Requirements 

• SIS-3 1 8 Topics in North America Studies: 
Norfti America A Union, a Community, or Just 

Three Nations? (3) 
or 
SIS-503 North American SumrrBr Institute; 

Discovering North America Seminar (3) 

• a mioimum of two Norfti American-related issues courses 
ficm the following, or oftier North American topics courses 
with the program coordirBtor's approval: 

ECON-358 Economics ofthe Vforld Regions: 

Norfli America (3) 
GOVT-338 North AnMican PoUtics (3) 
SIS -400 Senior Seminar in Internationa] Relations: 

PoUtics ofRegional Integration (3) 

Norfti American Social Movements (3) 
SIS -5 13 Computer Applications in International Relations 

Research (3) (fixius cm North America) 

• 9 additional credit hours including an approved intonsh^ or 
courses taken at selected universities in Canada and Mexico, 
and from special courses taught by CNAS Senior Fellows and 
the following, with ftie program coordinator's approval: 
AMSr-400 Interpreting American Culture (4) 

ECON-3 19 United States Economic History (3) 
FREN-326 Fr«ich Topics: 

Civilisation, Litterature, et Cinema du Quebec (3) 
SPAN-3 56 Spanish Topics: 

Mexico-U.S. Border (3) 
SIS -31 8 Topics in North American Studies: 

PoUtics and Institutions of International Trade (3) 

The Foreign PoUcy of a Middle Power The Case of 

Canada (3) 

Graduate Certificate in 

North American Studies 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students viith a bachelor's degree or equivalent fiom 
an accredited institution with approval of flie program cocsdina- 
tor. 
Requirements 

• 1 8 credit hours of approved courses with grades of C or better 
and with at least 9 oedit hours at the 600-level 

Students take the core course anl 15 additional credit hours in 
Norfti AnErican-related course work, induding study abroad 



PeifomiingArts:Music,Theatre,E)aiice, and Arts Management 153 



in Canada or Mexico and/or an approved internship, with a 
mininiim 3.0 OPA in courses forthe certificate overafl and a 
3.3 GPA in the core courses. 

Qrades of C- or D in certificate program cowses are not 
accepted toward the fiJflUment of certificate roquironents, 
although these grades will be included in the calculation of the 
GPA. 55tudcnts rrust have at least a 3.0 CPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate Students in 
certificate programs mist take a minimim of 6 credit hows 
during each 1 2-month period and coiqplete the certificate in 
fcMT years. Intemation^ students must enroll in 9 credit houis 
each semester (except for summer). A maximum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an acoedited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit. 

• A minimum of two years of Spani^ or French language 
courses at the post-secondary level witti grades ofB or better, 
or a level of conmunicaticn corrpetency equivalent to the 
entry level for 4rird->«ar conversation and corr|X)sition, as 
demonstrated by a placement score of 42 1 points in French or 
440 points in Spanish on the Coirputa- Assisted Proficiency 
Exam (CAPE) administered by the Language Resource 
Center in the Department of Language and Foreign Studies 
(LPS). 

• Repaiationofasignificantteseaichpaperaspartofoneoftfae 
core courses or as a reflection on study abroad or approved 
irAem^p 

• Approved study abroad in Canada or Mexico or an intemsh^ 
with a North American focus 



Course Requirements 

• SIS-618 Topics in North America Studies: 
North America: A Union, a Community, or Just 

Three Nations? (3) 
or 
SIS-503 North American Summer Institute: 

I^covering North America Seminar (3) 

• a minimum of two North American-related issues courses 
fiom the following, or other North AriBrican topics courses 
with the program cooniinator's approval: 

ECON-658 EcoiBmics of the World Regions: 

North America (3) 
GOVT-638 North American Politics (3) 
SlS-513 Computer Applications in International Relations 

Research (3) (focus on Norfii America) 
SlS-676 Selected Topics in Cross-National Study 

North American Social Movements 

• 9 additional credit hours induding an approved intem^p or 
courses takai at selected universities in Canada and Mexico, 
and fixjm special courses taught by CNAS Senior Fellows and 
the following wifti the program coordinator's apptovaL 
BCON-6 1 9 United States Economic History (3) 
FREN-626 French Topics: 

Civilisation, Litterature, et Cinema du Quebec (3) 
SPAN-656 Danish Topics: 

Mexico-US Bolder (3) 
SlS-618 Topics in North American Studies: 

BaUtics and Institutions of htemational Trade (3) 

The Foreign Policy of a Middle Rower The Case of 
'(3) 



Performing Arts: Music, Theatre, Dance, and Arts 
Management 



Chair Gail Hurtphries Maidirosian 
FuB-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus/a C. F. Crowder, A.R. Mandel, 
V.E. Mason, N. Prevots, GC. Schuetze, E. Vraiios 
Professor C. Jennings, H. Mardirosian, J. Sapie>evski 
Associate Professor Emeritus K. Bakei; B. Baranovic 
Associate Professor Q Humphries Mardirosian 
Assistant Professor D. Abraham, F. Benadon, J. Berard, 
J. Brasky, R. Esposito, C. Gabriel, R Goler, K. Kippola, 
C. ^fenningel; W. Shiith 

The Departmart ofPerfonrring Artsprovides intensive pro- 
fessional training in each of its disdphnes: music, ttieatre, mu- 
sic ftieatie, dance, and arts management. The programs offer a 
unique Hend of classroom work and performance or profes- 
sIoibI experieiK». Each year a season of plays, misicals, or- 
chestra and dioral concerts, and dance concerts augments 



classroom learning with actual experieiKe. Similariy, the aits 
management progran provides hands-on experience throu^ 
field studies and intemshps with kical ornational arts org^miza- 
tions. 

In M 2005, the university opened the new Katzen Arts 
Center. This new space provides exceptional venues for each of 
the department's programs. It includes a 200-seat recital hall, a 
studio theatre seating up to 100, teaching studios and practice 
rooms, organ, piano, and peroussion studios, classrooms de- 
signed for perfijrming arts, an arts managemei< resource cents-, 
and a Ubrary housing thousands of volumes of niisic scores, 
books, and recordings. 

Dedicated to advancing ttie d^Mitiisnt's educational vision 
through excellence in performance and design, the Harold and 
Sylvia Greenberg Theatre on Wisconsin Ave. is a venue for 
theatre, music, and dance performances. In addition to a 
300-seat theatre, ttie facility includes a scene shop, costume 
shop, and state-of-the-art equ^ment. 



154 College of Arts and Sciaices 



The Visiting Artists and Artists-in-Residence programs 
piovide students with opportunities to meet and woric with well 
known professionals in each of the disciplines. Visiting artists 
have included Erick Hawkins, Twyla Tharp, James Kronzer, 
Pad Morella, and Patrick Stewart. Musicians-in-Residence 
have included Nancy Snider, Linda AUison, Terri La2ar, and 
OmanKivrak. 

The dynamic interaction of performance experience, theo- 
retical and historical understanding, and exposure to 
well-eslabMied professionals is designed to prepare studeiis 
for a profession^ or teaching career. The Washingtan, D.C. 
area is ttie home of many arts prominent organizations, includ- 
ing the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 
Smithsonian Institution, Washington Ballet, Wolf Trap 
Foundation for the Performing Arts, National Syrtphony, 
Washington National Opera, and the Washington Performing 
Arts Society. In addition, Washington, D.C. 's rich international 
culture provides opportunites to enhance cultural knowledge 
through interactions with international artists and performing 
arts groups. This environment provides an excellent chmate 
for the nurturing of the creative ^irit. 

Teaching Certification 

Students interested in teacher certification in theatre and 
dance may take a 36-credit hour second major in secondary ed- 
ucation or combine their degree with the M A.T. degree with a 
concentration in secondary education. For information on ad- 
mission and program lequimnents, see the School of Educa- 
tion, Teaching and Health teacher preparation prograns. 

B.A. in Music 

American University is an accredited institutional member 
offlie National Association of Schools of Misic (NASM). 

Admission to the Program 

Formal admission to tiie muac mqor requires demonstrated 
ability tnougli an audition and interview ananged witti ttie de- 
partmett, preferaHy pmor to beginning university studies. How- 
ever, a student may enter as an intended major and 
auditicHVintervie w during the first >ear. Students will be accepted 
based en pro g i ai i nB tic approval and written declaration of ma- 
jor 

University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit homs 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence from 
each of the five cunicular areas 

• No more than 6 ciedit hours maybe taken in the same 
disc^line 



Major Requirements 

• 53 ciedit hours with grades of C or better 

Applied Music Lesson requirement: all students must 
successfiilly corrqilete a minimum of four semesters of 
MUS-122 Private Instrumental or Vfocal Study on a prindpal 
instrument or \«ice; music m^ors mist enroll for a one-hour 
lesson each week and attend the weekly music performance 
lab (MUS-OOl). 

Jury examinations mist be undertaken at the end of each 
semester except when the student is presenting a recital in 
MUS-334orMUS^34. 

Performance Ensertble requirements: All studaits must 
sucoessfiilly oon:5)lete a minimum of four semesters of 
approved performance ensemWes. Music majors nust enroll 
in a performance ensemble in all seriBSters in which they are 
enrolled in appJied misic lessons. 

Music Prerequisite Courses 

These courses are waived for students with equivalent music 

experience: 

• MUS-lOO Class Instrumental Study. Piano (1 ) 

• PERF-120MusicFundamentals(3) withagradeofBorbetter 
Course Requirements 

• PERF-124HannonyI(3) 

• PERF-125Hannonyn(3) 

• PERF-227MuacianshipI(3) 

• PERF-228 Musicianship n (3) 

• PERF-322 Music History I: From Antiquity to 1 750 (3) 

• PERF-323 Music History II: 1750 to Present (3) 

• PERF-324Fonn and Analysis (3) 

• PERF-325 Counterpoint (3) 

• PERF-445 Senior Capstone: Music (3) 

• A minimum of 8 credit hours in 

MUS-1 22 Private histrumental or Vocal Study (2) 

• A minimum of 4 credit hours in performance aiseni>les: 
PERF-1 42^542 University Choros (1) 
PERF-143/543 Ltaiversity Singers (2) 
PERF-144'544 University Ordiestra(l) 
PERF-145/545 Chamber Ensenfcles (1) 
PERF-146'546 Jazz Ensemble (1) 

PERF-161/561 Gospel Choir (1) 
Area of Concentration 

• A minirnum of 14 credit hours in an area of concentration. 
Students may select from the following ordesign an individual 
area of concentiBtion with aj^Moval of their academic advisor 
and the director of misic. Exanples of individually designed 
areas include music production, international arts 
management, and music criticism. 

Arts Management (15 credit hours) 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• ACCT-241 Princqiles of Managerial Accouirting (3) 



Perfoimiiig Arts: Music, Theabe, Dance, and Arts Management 1 55 



BCON-200/ECaNr-200G Microeconomics 4: 2 (3) 

• ECON-100/ECON-100(jMacroeconomics4:l(3) 

• MKrO-300Principlesof Management (3) 

• reRF-570 Survey of Arts Management (3) 

Composition (16 credit hours) 

• MUS-122 Private Instnimental or Vocal Study: 
Composition (2) three semesters for a total of 6 credit hours 

• MUS-434 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study: 

Senior Recital (4) 

• PERF-326 Orchestration (3) 

• FERF-435 Topics in Music (3) (approved topic) 

Jan Studies (16 credit hours) 

• MUS-122 Private Instnimental or Vocal Study (2) three 
additional semesters for a total of 6 credit hours 

• MUS-434 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study: 

Senior Recital (4) 

• PERF-226 hnjSTJvisation (3) 

• FERF-321 The Evolution of JazzandBlues(3) 

Performance (16 credit hours) 
Vocal Performance 

• MUS-122 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study (2) three 
additional semesters for a total of 6 credit hours 

• MUS-434 Private Instrumental or Vocal Study: 

Senior Recital (4) 

• reRF-251 Fundamentals of Acting I (3) 

• PERF-356 Diction for Singers (3) 

German, Italian, or French language courses are 
recommended 
Instrumental Performance 

• MUS-122 Private Instnimental or Vocal Study (2) three 
additional semesters for a total of 6 credit hours 

• MUS-434 Private Instnimental or Vocal Study: 

Senior Recital (4) 

• FERF-435 Topics in Music (3) {approved topic) 

• PERF-550 Chairiber Enseirbles (1 ) three sonesters for a 
total of 3 credit hours 

History and Literature or Anthropology of Music 
(15 credit hours) 

• MST-IOO/HIST-IOOG Historiansand the Living Rist 2:1 (3) 

• HIST-xxA or ANTH-xxx tqjproved oouree (3) 

• FERF-435 Topics in Music (3) (approved topic) (two 
courses for a total of 6 credit hours) 

• FERF-491 PferfomiingArts IntaBship(l-6) 
or 

ffiRF-435 Topics in Music (3) (approved topic) 

• Seniorthesis written project submitted for PERF-445 Senior 
Q^stone; Music 



Theory (15 credit hours) 

• PERF-326 Orchestration (3) 

• FERF435 Topics in Music (3) (approved topic) (three 
courses for a total of 9 credit hours) 

• HiRI^-585 Creative Theories and Criticism in Performing 

Arts (3) 

• Senior thesis written poject submitted for FERF-445 Senior 
Capstone: \6isic 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors ftogram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with Univasity Honors in the nBJor To do 
so, students complete 1 2 hours of advanced-level Itonors woric 
in tt>e dq)artment and, iq)on departmental recommendation, 
graduate with University Honors in the major Students should 
consult their major advisor for departmental options. 

B.A. in Performing Arts: Music Theatre 

AdmissioD to the Program 

FornBl admission to the majorrequires demonstrated talent 
through an audition arranged wifti the department, preferably 
prior to beginning university studies. However, a student may 
ento" as an intended major and audition during the first year. 
Students will be accepted based on programmatic approval and 
written declaration of raqor 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or ftie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouises,consislingofonefoundationcouiseand 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 48 credit hours with grades of C or b^er 

Students who wish to study abroad must receive prior 
university approval, as well as qiproval fiom their advisor, in 
order to ensure that apgmpasAe courses will transfer and fhctf 
sdiolaiships and financial aid will apply. 

• Rirtic^jation in a minimum of four department psoductions 
and management (as stage manager or assistant stage 
manager) of one of these productions before graduation 

Course Requirements 

• FERF-227 Musidanship I (3) am/ 
FERF-228 Musicianship D (3) 

or 

FERF-l 24 Haimony I (3) am/ FERF-1 25 HamMny H (3) 

• FERF-251 Fundamentals of Acting I (3) 



156 College of Arts and Scimces 



• PERF-252 Fundamentals of Acting n (3) 

• PERF-265 Theatre Practicum : Stagp Managenent (1) and 

Scene/Lifting (1) or Costume (1) 

• PERF-340 From Scene irto Song (3) 

• PERF-342 Vocal Tedmiques for Music Tlieatie (3) 

• PERF-346 Survey ofMusic Theatre (3) 

• PERF-445 Senior Capstone: Music Theatre (3) 

• PERF-556 Acting V: Audition Techniques (3) 

• One course fiom the following: 
PERF-350Futtlamentalsof Actingm (3) 
PERF-355 Speech and Vdce (3) 
PERF-450 Rotating Topics in Theatre (3) 
PERF-555 Acting IV: From Stage to Screen (3) 

• One course fiom the following: 

PERF-306 History and Philosophy of Dance: 20th 

Century (3) 
PERF-322 History ofMuac I : from Antiquity to 1700 (3) 
PERF-323 History ofMusic 0: fiom 1700 to Present (3) 
PERF-365 Theatre Hstoiy I: fiom &e Oieeks to the 

Renaissance (3) 
PERF-366 Theatre Hstoiy II: from Baroque to the End of 

the Nineteentii Century (3) 
PERF-367 Theatre listoiy III: Tweiiieth Century (3) 

• 9 credit hours of dance technique courses, to be detemmed 
by audition placement, induding PERF-450 Rotating Topics 
in Theatre: Styles of Muacal Theatre Dance 

• 4 credit hours of apiplied nsisic (MUS-xxx): voice 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have tiie oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students con^lete 12 hours of advaiBed-level Honors work 
in the department and, upon departmental recornnendatioa, 
graduate with University Honors ki the major. Students ^ould 
consult their major advisor for departrrEntal options. 

B.A. in Performing Arts: Theatre 

Admission to the Program 

Formal adnission to the mq'or requires dermnstrated tal- 
ent through an audition portfoUo review arranged with the de- 
partmait, preferably prior to beginning university studies. 
However, a student may enter as an intended mqor and have 
an audition or portfolio review during tiie first year. Students 
will be accepted based on programnatic approval and written 
declaration of major 

University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college rrathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 



General Education Requirements 

• A total o ften courses, consisting of one foundation course aiKi 
one second-level course in an approved sequence fixxneacfa of 
the five cuiricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
disc^line 

Tracks 

Performance, Technical, and Arts Marsgensnt 

Major Requirements 

• 47 credit hours with grades of C or better 

Students who wish to study abroad rrust receive prior 
university approval, as wdl as approval fimn ttjeir advisor, in 
order to ensure that appropriate courses will tiansfa* and that 
scholarships and financial aid will Bpp\y. 

• Participation inaminimumoffour department productioiB in 
eithw a paTormance or technical capacity One of these rtust 
be dme as stage manager or aari start stage maoaga. 

Course Requirements 
Core (26 credit hours) 

• PERF-1 1 5/PERF-l 15G Iheatre: Priicq)les, Plays, 

and Performance 1 : 1 (3) 

• PERF-181 Stage Make-up (1) 

• PERF-251FurKlamentalsofActingI(3) 

• PERF-260 Principles ofProduction I (4) 

• PERF-265 Theatre Practicum Stage Management (1 ) ami 
two of the following; Scene/Limiting (1), Cxjstume (1), 
Public Relations (1) 

• PERF-365 Theah« Hstoiy I: fiom te Greeks to ttie 

Renaissance (3) 

• PERF-366 Theatie Mstoiy 11: fixjm Baroque to the End of 
the Nineteenth Century (3) 

or 

PERF-367 Theah^ Hstory DI: Twertieth Century (3) 

• PERF^t45 Senior Capstone: Theatre (3) 

• PERF-552 Directing Techniques (3) 
One of the following tracks: 

Performance T^ack (21 credit hours) 

• PERF-252 FunJamentals of Acting n (3) 

• PERF-350FuttiamentalsofActingm(3) 

• PERF-355 Speech and Vdce (3) 

• PERF-555 Acting FV: From Stage to Screen (3) 

• PERF-556 Acting V: Audition Techniques (3) 

• 3 credit hours fixjm ttie following: 
PERF-340 From Scene irto Song (3) 
PERF-346 Survey ofMusic Theati« (3) 
PERF-362 Lighting Design (3) 

PERF-364 Basics of Scene and Costume Design (3) 

• 3 credit hours fiom flie following; 
PERF-450 Rotating Topics in Theatre (3) 



Perfoiming Arts: MisiCv Theatre, Danoe, and Arts MaoagenKnt 1 57 



FERF-557 Oeative Writers Perfonnance Lab (3) 
FERF^Ql PbrfoimingArts Internship (3) 
Technical Track (21 credit hours) 

• PERF-355 SpeetJi and Voice (3) 

• FERF-557 Creative Writers Perfotmaiee I ab (3) 

• FERF-362Lightiig Design (3) 

• PERF-364 Basics of Scene and Costume Design (3) 

• FERF440 Stage Management (3) 

• FERF^90 hdependert Stuiy Project (3) 

• PERF-491 Perfomiing Arts Internship (3) 

Arts Management Track (21 credit hours) 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• BCON-IOO/ECCN-IOOO Macroeconomics 4:1 (3) 

• PERF-570 Survey ofArts Management (3) 

• 3 (a^edit hours firm tiie following 
PERF-362 Ughtiig Design (3) 

IERF-364 Basics of Scene and Costume Design (3) 

• 9 aedA hours firm the following 
ffiRF-252 Fundamentals of Acting 11 (3) 
reRF^t40 Stage Management (3) 
FERF-450 Rotating Topics in Tteatre (3) 

fERF-490 Indepoident Study Project in Perfottning Aits (3) 
reRF491 Perfomiing Arts: Intanship(3) 
PERF-557 Creative WitersPerformaiBe Lab (3) 
FERF-585 Creative Theories and Criticism of Performing 
Arts (3) 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors ftogram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with Lfaiversity Honors in the major. To do 
so, students complete 1 2 hours of advanced-level Ifonors woik 
in the department and, upon departmental lecoirmendation, 
graduate with University Honors in the major Students should 
consult their major advisor for departmental options. 

Minor in Dance 

• 24 credit hours with grades of Cor better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• FERF-305MstDiyandPhibsophyofDanoeI: 

15th-19th Centuries (3) or 
FERF-306 Mstoiy and PhitosojAy ofDanoe IL 
20th Century (3) 

• FERF41 1 CbiT^iositioD ofDance I (3) or 
lERF^ 12 Composition ofDanoe II (3) 

• reRF-506 The Moving Body (3) 

• reRF-507Princf)lesofMovemait(3) 

• 12 credit hours in dance electives 

Note: Students intending to pursue the ninormust be assigned a 
departmental advisor. Students must achieve some proficiency 
in dance perfonnance. Required levels of proficiency are de- 



cided individually in conference with the director of the dance 
program, and take into account the student's interests, back- 
ground, and abilities in dance. 

Minor in Music 

• 21 credh hours with grades of Cor better with at least 12 
CKdit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 
Performance 

• reRF-124HarmDnyI(3)an</PERF-125HarnBivn(3) 
or 

reRF-227 Musicianship I (3) and 
reRF-228 Misidanship H (3) 

• RERF-322 Hstoiy ofN4isic L fiom Artiquity to 1700 (3) 
or 

EERF-323 Hstwy ofMisic IL fixm 1700 to toe Present (3) 

• Three semesters of MUS-122 Private Study (2) fcr a 
total of 6 credit hours 

• 6 credit hoirs in music electives at the 300 level or above 

Theory /History 

• PERF-124HarmDnyI(3)anJPERF-125HamBjtyn(3) 
or 

HiRF-227 Musicianship I (3) and 
IERF-228 Musicianship H (3) 

• FERF-322 listoiy of N4isic L ficm Artiquily to 1700 (3) or 
FERF-323 Hstoiy of Music IL fiom 1700 to the VkosA (3) 

• 12 credit hours of mxisc electives at the 300 levd or above 

Minor in Theatre 

• 22 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• PERF-115/PERF-1150Theatre;Princ^les,Plays,and 

Performance 1:1 (3) 

• FERF-251 Fundamentals of Acting I (3) 

• FERF-260ftincf)lesofProductionI(4) 

• FERF450 Rotating Topics in Theatre (3) or 
FERF-557 Qeative Writers'Perfirmanoe Laboratory (3) 

• One of the following: 
PERF-362 Ughling Design (3) 

FERF-364 Basics of Scene and Costume Design (3) 

• One of the following; 

PERF-350 Fundamentals of Acting m (3) 
FERF-355 Speech and Voice for the Theatre (3) 
FERF-450 Rotating Topics in Thsatre (3) 
reRF-555 Acting rV: FromStage toScreai(3) 

• One of the following: 

FERF-220/PERF-220G Reflections of American Socity on 
Stage and Screen 1 :2 (3) 



158 College of Arts and Sciences 



PERF-365 Theatre Hstoiy I : fiomthe Greeks to the 

Renaissance (3) 
PERF-366 Theatre Kstory U: from Baroque to the End of 

the Nineteenth Century (3) 
PERF-367 Theatre Kstoiy ID: Twentieth Century (3) 
Note: Studoits iiAending to ptssue tiie minor must be assigned 
a depaitmental advisor. 

M.A. in Performing Arts: 

Arts Management 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments fijr graduate study, applicants mist have comfteted at 
least niie undergraduate courses in theatre, dance, taisic, or 
visual arts, one-third of which imst be advanced woik or its 
equivalent. Equivalent training is understood to be four or 
more years' experience in a profesional company or organiza- 
tion. Students apjiying to the program with this background 
will be asked for an interview Two letters of recommmdation 
and Graduate Record Exarranation (ORE) scores are required. 
PiDvisional admission may be granted and is removed at &e 
completion of 1 2 ciedit houis of course woric with a minimum 
grade point average of 3,00. 

Degree Requirements 

• 45 credit hours of approved graduate woik 

• AdvancenKnt to candidacy on completing 12 to 18 credit 
horns with a grade point averagp of 3.00 or higher, removing 
any undergraduate deficiencies, and with the written 
recommendation of the student's faculty advisor 

• A four-hour ccanprehensive examination covering three 
areas arts management, and two areas of specialization 

• 6 credit hours from one oftiie fcllowing with grades of B or 
better 

Non-thesis option: 

PERF-702 Masters Pbrtfdio Seminar 
PERF-793 Directed Research in the Arts 
Theas option: PERF-797 Master's Thesis Seminar 
Course Requirements 

• PERF-570 Survey of Arts Management (3) 

• PERF-571 Maiketing in the Arts (3) 

• PERF-585 Creative Theories and Criticism in 

Perfcxming Arts (3 ) 

• PERF-673 Fund Raising Management for the Arts (3) 

• PERF-674 Financial Management in the Arts (3) 



• PERF-691 Performing Arts: Irtemship (1-6) 
or 

PERF-692 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3-6) 

• 6 credit hours from ttie following: 
PERF-702 Masters Ftortfoho Seminar ( 1 -6) 
PERF-793 Directed Research in the Arts ( 1 -6) 
PERF-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (1-6) 

• 6credithoursinapprovedarts-relatednonmanagerialcouises 

• 12 credit hours in approved elective courses including 
business administration, communication, and public 
administration 

Graduate Certificate in 

Arts Management 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent from 
an accredited institution. Apphcants niist have completed nine 
or more courses in theatre, dance, music, or visual arts, one ftiird 
o f which should be advanced work or equivEilent training. Equiv- 
alent training is four or more years' experience in a professional 
OTganistion Students are encouraged to schedule a po'sonal in- 
terview with the jit)gram director 
Certificate Requirements 

• 15 credit hours of approved course work with at least 6 credit 
hours at the 600-level or above, with grades ofC or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the flilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although these grades wiU be included in ftie calculation of the 
GPA. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs rraist take a minimim of 6 credit hours 
during eadi 1 2-inDnth period and oorr^lete the certificate in 
four years Intematianal students must emoU in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A maxinum of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward the certificate as transfer credit 

Course Requirements 

• PERF-570 Survey of Arts Management (3) 

• PERF-571 Maiketing in fee Arts (3) 

• PERF-672 Rotating Topics in Arts Managemait (3) (two 
courses for a total of 6 credit hours) 

• PERF-673 Fund-RaisingManagemait for the Arts (3) 
or 

PERF-585 Creative Theories and Ciiticiaii in Perfonning 
Arts (3) 



Philosophy and Religion 159 



Philosophy and Religion 



Chair Amy Oliver 

FuB-Tipie Faculty 

WiHiam Fraser McDowell Professor i¥L. Reiinan 

Professor Emeritus H. A. Durfee, CD. Hardwidc, 

C SJ. White 

Professor Q Cjreenbeig, DPT. Rodier 

Associate Professor Emeritus P.R Scrilmer 

Associate Professor A Oliver , L.J. Fteach 

Asastant Professor F. Erfeni, E. Feder, J. Park, 

A. Tschenplik 

Visiting Assistant nvfessor Jason Springs 

Phitosophy explores the nature of the world, the basis of hu- 
man values, and ftie foundaticms of reason. Philosophy also of- 
fers the diallenge of interpreting the work of thinkers who haw 
created our intellectual traditions. 

The study of philosophy provides excellent preparation for 
law.medicine, social woik, the ministry, and other professional 
careers. Many poations in science and industry require the 
kinds of analytical skills gained through the study of philoso- 
phy. Phibsophy teadies precision in reasoning and clarity in 
expression — assets in any fieki Alurnni of the B.A andM.A 
programs have pursued graduate work in philosophy and re- 
lated areas sudi as political science, psychology, history, litera- 
ture, and other professional piograns. 

The study of \\festem and Eastern rehgious traditions intro- 
duces students to a major influence on aU civilizations. Journal- 
ists, diplomats, and government specialists benefit fiom a 
serious consideration of the inner workings of the rehgious 
ethos of civUizitions. Daily events remind us that there is no 
more motivating factor in the cultures of nations than ardently 
held rehgious behef A thorough understanding of die modem 
world requires farrriHarity with its rehgious hoitage. American 
University's Washington, D.C. setting is advantageous for the 
study of religion, with national oflBces and centers for many re- 
ligions in the metropolitan area The Consortium ofUniversities 
of the \\fehington Metropolitan Area also ofiers a variety of 
courses in phibsophy and religion that are available to Ameri- 
can Uniwrsity students. 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion annually 
awards the Col Harold and Ruth PearsonPrize in Philosophy to 
one or more majors who have demonstrated excellence in the 
study of philosophy 



B.A. in Philosophy 



Admission to the Program 

AdmissicHi is teou^ a formal declaration of major. The de- 
partment counsels freshrten and new transfer students. 
University Requirements 
• Atotalof 120 credit hours 



• 6 credit hotss of college wiitiog 

• 3 credit hoirs of college rmthematics or ttie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencourses,oonsistingofonefoundationcourseand 
one second-level course in an ^iproved sequence fiom each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No mwe than 6 credit hours may be taken in the sanK 
discipline 

Major RequiremeDts 

• 39 credit hours with grades of C or better 
Course Requirements 

• 30 credit hours in philoeopiiy and rehgion, including 9 credit 
hours in philosophy at the 300 level or above, and 14) to 9 
o^it hours in rehgion 

• 9 credit hours in a single department outside of philosophy 
and religion, including 6 credit hours at the 300 level orabove 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University HorBrs Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with Uhivasity Honors in the major. Up- 
per-level Honors courses for majors in philosophy or rehgion 
are given in ttie Department of Hiilosophy and Rehgion as 
Homrs siqiplements to 300-level courses or above. The depart- 
merl's Honors coordinator advises students in the University 
Honors Program reg^irding departmental options. 

Minor in Philosophy 

• 18 credit hours with giadesof Cor better with at least 12 
oedit hours unique to the minor, and at least 9 credit faouis 
at tile 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• 3 credit hours firm the following: 
PHIL-105/HCL-105G Western Philosophy 2:1 (3) 
fflIL-300 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3) 
PHIL-301 Modem Phflosophy fiom Bacon to Hegel (3) 

• 15 credit hours in philosophy (or 12 credit hours in 
philosophy and 3 credit hours in rehgian) 



Minor in Religion 



• 21 credit hours with grades of C or better with at least 1 2 
aedit hours unique to the minor, and at least 9 credit hours 
at the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• 9 credit hoixs chosen fiom the fdlowing: 
RELG-105/RELG-105G Religious Heritage of fee 

V^fest21(3) 
RELG-1 70 hitroduction to the New Testament (3) 



160 CoUege of Arts and Sciences 



RE1jG-185/RELG-185G Forms offlie Sacred Religjonsof 

the East 3; 1(3) 
REIjG-220/RELG-220G Religious Thou^t 2:2 (3) 

• 12ciedithDursinreligion(or9credithoursinreligionand3 
credit hours in philosophy) 

Combined B.A. and M. A. in Philosophy 

Admission to the Program 

Undergraduate philosophy majors should apply for admis- 
sion to the BA./MA. program by the end of the junior year. 
Admisaon is opai to undergraduates with a minimum grade 
pant average of 3.00 overall and in philosophy courses, Af^- 
cations must be accoirpanied by two letters of recommenda- 
tion, a statensnt of purpose, and an academic writing sample. 
Students should discuss their interest in the program with 
membsTS oftfie faculty before submitting a formal appUcation. 
Requirements 

• All recpiirements for the B. A. in Philosophy 
Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours of 
appnoved 500-level course work in philosophy to satisfy toe 
requirements of both degrees. 

• All requirements for the M.A in Hiilosophy, including a 
minimum of 24 credit hours completed in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. 

M.A. in Philosophy 

Admission to the Program 

Apphcants mist meet the minimim university require- 
nents fi)r graduate study. Admisson is based on academic re- 
cord, two letters of reoorranendation, a statement of purpose, 
and an academic writing sanple. The Qraduale Record Exami- 
nation (ORE) General is required. 
Tracks 

History of Philosophy or Philosophy and Social Policy 
Degree Requironents 

• 30^33 credit hours of approved graduate work 

History of Philosophy IVack 

• Tool of research: demonstrated pnoficieocy in a foreign 
language, consult the department for more information 

• Comprehensive examination requirement: submission of 
three qualifying papiers 

• Thesis and oral defense of ttiesis 

Philosophy and Social Policy TVack 

• 3 credit intem^p in an apprcpoiate setting followed by a 
substantial paper analyzing the ethical and social issues 
arising fium the experience. Students employed fiill-time 
may request permission to receive credit for prior 
experience, but the p^ier is still reqisred. 

• Comprehensive examination requirement: submission of 
three qualifying papas 



Course Requirements 

History of Philosophy Track (30 credit hours) 

• 24 credit hours of approved graduate course work 

• PHlL-797 Master's Thesis Seninar (6) 

Philosophy and Social Policy T^ack (33 credit hours) 

• Two courses from the following: 
PHIL-520 Seminar on Ethical Theory (3) 
PHIL-525 Seminar on Modem Moral Problems (3) 

an approved course in either ettiics or applied ethics (3) 

• Two courses from the following: 
PHILr602 Nin^enth Century Philosophy (3) 
PHIL-603 Twentieth Ceriury FMosophy (3) 

an approved course in the history of philosophy (3) 

• PHIL-691 Internship in Philosopiiy (3) 

• 6 credit hours in q}plied philosophy, with departmoital 
apjproval 

• 6 credit hours in philosophy or religion, with departmental 
approval 

• 6 credit hours in social sciaice or social poUcyfiom fields such 
as economics, sociology, anthropology, government, pubUc 
administration, and justice, wifli departmental approval 

M.A. in Ethics, Peace, and Global Affairs 

Admission to the Program 

The MA. in Ethics, Peace, and Qobal Aflairs is an interdis- 
cqjlinary pirogram administered jointly by the School of Intenia- 
ticoal Service (SIS) and the Department of Philosophy and 
ReUgion in ttie College of Arts and Sciences (CAS). 

Students may apjply to either the DepartmHit of PhflosojAy 
and Religion or die School of International Service. The Gradu- 
ate Record Examination (GRE) is required . Students applying to 
SIS must apply by January 15 for fall and October 1 fbrspring to 
be considered for merit-based aid. 
Degree Requiranents 

• 39 aedit hours of approved graduate work induding 6 credit 
hours of researdi course work with grades of B or better 

• CoTHjrehaisive examinalion requirement 
CAS: submission of three qualifying p>apers 

Course Requironents 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• PHII^525 Seminar on Modem Moral Problems (3) 

• PHIL^93 Global Efiiics (3) 

• SIS-607Fteace Paradigms (3) 

• SIS -6 14 Ethics in International Af&irs (3) 

Foundation (6 credit hours) 

• PHI1^520 Seminar on Ethical Theory (3) 

• SIS-«22HumanRi^ts(3) 

Research Methodology (3 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in IntemationBl Affairs (3) 



Philosophy and ReUgion 1 61 



qualitative leseaich semiDar 
Research and Writing (6 credit hours) 

• 6 credit huirs fiom the followiDg: the thesis or substantial 
research paper and internship must relate clearly to the 
student's concentration and be supersTsed by faculty teaching 
related couraes: 

miL-797 Master's Thesis Seminar (1-6) 

or 

FHIL-691 fatem^p in Philosojiiy (3) and 

niIl.-702 Oaduate Seminar in Philosophy 

or 

SIS-691 hitemship in tatemational Affairs (3) and 

SIS-795 Master's Research Requirement (3) 

• 12 credit hours in one ofthe following areas of concentration 

Peace and Conflict Resolution 

• SIS -609 Conflict Analysis and Resolution; Theory and 

Practice (3) 

• Three courses Irom the following 

FHIL-61 3 Studies in Asian Philosophy (3) (approved topic) 
fflIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-515 Islamic Peace Paradigns (3) 
SIS-516 Peacebuilding in Divided Societies (3) 
SIS-517 Gender and Conflict (3) 
SIS-540 Conflict and Devebpmait (3) 
SIS-606 Culture and Psace and Conflict Resolution: 

Ahemativesto Violence (3) 
SIS-611 Intranational Negotiation (3) 
SIS -6 13 Reconciliation and Justice (3) 
SIS-619 Special Studies in International Politics: 

Human Ri^ts and Conflict (3) 
Human Rights and Social Justice 

• Four courses from the following: 
FHIL-61 6 Feminist PMosojAy (3) 
IHIL-617 Race and Philosophy (3) 

IHIL-686 Selected Topics in FMosojiiy (3) (a^jproved 

topic) 
SIS-613 Reconciliation and Justice (3) 
SIS-5 17 Gender and Conflist (3) 
SlS-619 Special Studies in hitemational Pciitics: 

Human Ri^ts and Conflict (3) 
SIS-621 Intanational Law and the Legal Older (3) 
Global Environmental Justice 

• SlS-eeO Qivironment and Politics (3) 



• Ihree courses trom the following 

FHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SlS-619 Special Studies in Mteraational PoUtics: 

Global EnvironrtBntal Politics and Policy (3) 
SIS-649 Environment and l>evelopment (3) 
SIS -663 Washington WjrkAop: Advanced Studies and 

Research in EnvironinBntal PoUcy (3) 
Ethics of Development 

• SIS-637 International Developmait (3) 

• Three courses from the following 

FHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-540 Conflict and Devebpment (3) 
SIS-636 MkawpoKticsof Developmert (3) 
SIS-647 Governance, Democracy, and Development (3) 
SIS-648 Women and DevebpnMit (3) 
SIS-649 Environment and Development (3) 
SIS-650 Global Economy and Sustainable Development (3) 

(prerequisite; SIS-637 International DevelofHnent) 
International Economic Justice 

• SIS -616 Intranational Econcmics (3) (prerequisite: 

BCON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory) 

• Three courses from the following 

IHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-504 Multinational Corporations (3) 
SIS-587 CMobaUzition; Power, Production, and Culture (3) 
SIS-650 Global Economy and Sustainable Development (3) 

(prerequisite: SIS-637 International Developmeii) 
SIS-665 Intonational Trade and Investmeii Reliions (3) 
SIS-666 International Monetary and Financial Relations (3) 
SIS-673 Comparative PoUtical Economy (3) 
Global Governance and International Organizations 

• SIS-621 Intanational Law and the Legal Order (3) 

• SIS-625 International OrgadzaticHis (3) 

• Two courses from the following: 

FHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-587 Globah2ation: Power, Production, and Culture (3) 
SIS-605 Theory of Cooperative Global Politics (3) 
SIS-647 Governance, Democracy, and Developiment (3) 
SIS-672 Theories of Comparative and International 

Studies (3) 



162 College of Arts and Sciences 



Preprofessional Programs 



Pre-engineering 



Faculty Liaison Teresa Laikin, Department of Computer 
Sdence, Audio Technology, and Fhysics 

American Univeisity offers a cooperative five-year engi- 
neering program with the Univeisity of Maryland in College 
Paric. American University studoits can combine the advan- 
tages of both liberal arts and professional education. Students 
aie awarded two bachelor's degrees in a Gve-yea- period. 

Students spend three years on the American Lbiveisity cam- 
pus concentrating in a riBJor field in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences. In the third year, with recommendation of the 
piB-engineering faculty liaison, students aj^ly to the engineering 
program at ttie University of Maryland Afta- adrrissicn to flie 
program, the fourfli year of study is spent there. Once the student 
conpletes to requirements for Ae American University majcn- 
(generally at fee esxi ofthe fourth yearX fee first bachebr's de- 
gree is awarded. After compietion of fee engineering require- 
n£nts during fee fifth year, fee student receives a bachelor's 
d^ree in engineering fiom fee University of Maryland, 

Slud^its woik closely wife fee pre-engineering faculty liai- 
son and a &culty advisor in one of fee natural sciences, mafee- 
matics and statistics, computer science, or fee ofiBce of fee 
Associate Dean for Academic A flSrirs. Advisors will individually 
tailor course seledJcm to meet fee student's interests and needs. 
Students are genetally advised to rtajor in eifeer rrBthematics or 
a natural science, and to maintain a high grade point avaage. If, 
however, the student chooses to conplete a major in fee arts, hi- 
manities, or social sciences, he or she nBy do so, provided that 
fee engine^ing program requirements ae also satisfied Com- 
pletion of basic courses must be dene during fee first three years 
of study in order to coirplete fee requirements for an engineering 
degree in five years. Courees wife g^es below C will not trans- 
fer to the cooperating schools 
Course Requirements 

The engineering program at the IMversity of Maryland 
has base requirements covering a broad range of study, which 
mist be conpleted before entrance: 

• Two courses in English oorrposition 

• Two or three years of mafeeriBtics, including calculus and 
differential equations 

• Two years of general piiysics with laboratory and more 
rn-depfe study in mechanics and in electromagnetism or 
thenrcdynamics 

• One year ofgeneral chemistry with laboratory; for chemical 
engineering, a two -course sequence in oig^c chemistry 

• One course in ODnqxiter {TDgramming 



• Five courses in the humanities and fee social sciences 
Priorto applying to a particular engineering program, students 
should also have taken ENES 100 Introduction to Engineedng 
Design at fee University of Maryland, which is offaed every 
semester including fee summer. 

Prelaw 

Prelaw Advisors 

Douglas Vibert, College of Arts and Sciences 

Jonafean Post, Kogod School of Business 

Suzanne Skillings^ School of International Service 

Linda S^cer and Nathan WiUiamson, School of Public AfBiirs 

In considering law school, it is important that the prelaw stu- 
dent understands law schods' educational philosophy. As fee 
Law School Admission Bulletin states: "Any course, regardless 
of field, feat helps you dewlop clear and systematic thinking, 
command o f the Engli^ language, and a broad understanding of 
our sodety constitutes sound prqjaration for fee stucfy of law. 
Thus, law schools do not recommend specific imdergraduate 
majors for prelaw studaits." The prelaw student should also real- 
ize feat admission to law school is selective. Students contem- 
plating careos in law should plan feeir undergraduate stuc^ to 
undertake a substantial academic curriculum and acquire a back- 
ground of outstanding extracurricular activities. 

Students interested in prelaw preparation follow fee normal 
procedure fordeclaringand fiilfilling requirements foramajorin 
one of fee sdiools or departments or in gaining approval for an 
interdisciplinary program of study. Whatever fee choice of ma- 
jor, fee prelaw student 'sprogram ^ouldbe supported by a broad 
selection of courses fitm mafeematics, fee natural sciences, fee 
social sciences, and fee humanities. 

Courses recommended by law schools also include phibso- 
phy, literature and advanced writing courses, history, political 
sdence, accounting, business administiation, economics, mafee- 
matics, languages, and ofeer courses demanding logical think- 
ing, analytical reasoning, or verbal proficiency. 

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is required of every 
applicait to law school It is strongly recommended that this test 
be taken in June before fee senior year Wife this test date, stu- 
dents can appraise their pro^>ects and consider retaking fee ex- 
amination in October orDeceniber or both, or, if necessary, make 
alternate plans. Students apply directly to the Law School Ad- 
missions Service (LSAS) to take fee test on fee American TJhi- 
vosity campus and should register six weeks before fee test date. 
LSAF applications are available fiom fee prelaw advisors. 



Ptcprofesaonal Progrems 163 



Premedical Programs 



Program Coordinator I'^rederick W. Carson, 
Department ofC'hemistry, fcareon@american-edu 
www.americaaedii/cas/premBd.html 

The premedical programs of the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences are available tu help all undergraduate, postbaccalaureate, 
and graduate students who are considering a career in medicine 
or cne of the allied health professions. 

Premedical program services include extensive individual 
advising on cavers, courees, volunteer and research opportuni- 
ties, professional school examinations, selection of schools, and 
financial aid. The program also provides seminais by health 
professionals, resume preparation and essay writing assistance, 
medical school interview preparation, preparation of a compos- 
ite letter of evaluation, and sipport in compiling and sending 
letters of recommendation to professional schools. 

The anni»l Health Professions Seminar features first-hand 
advice fiom guests and former Aii»rican University students 
who have gone on to health professional schools. 

The annual Health Careers Forum brings togethw health 
professionals, admissions oflBcers, and career counselors who 
provide an overview of assistance available to students as well 
as opportunities and hi^ights of the admissions process for 
allopathic and osteopathic rrsdical, dental, and veterinary 
schools, and physician assistant, nurse practitioiKr, physical 
therapy, podiatry, optometry, public health, and other allied 
health prograns. 

Students from American University applying to medical, 
denial, or veterinary school have been hi^ly competitive, with 
86 percent o f qualified applicants accepted by medical schools. 
Advising Services 

Students interested in tire health pnvfessions ^ould contact 
the premedical programs coordinator as soon as possible. The 
coordinalor helps students select an appropriate curriculum, 
prepare for the relevant admissions tests, make realistic choices 
of professional schools, and learn first-hand about biorrGdical 
research and dinical f)ractice. The coordinator is available to 
meet with students individually at least once a semester to re- 
view their academic progress and course of study at American 
University. Together with students' academic advisors, flie co- 
ordinator helps assure timely conpleticn of both degree and 
prerrEdical requirerrsnta 

Typically, at the end of their junior year premedical studoits 
subrrit a primary appUcation to the American Medical Colleges 
Apjdication Service, which forwards this general appUcation to 
spedfied schools. Medical schools will then send individual ap- 
plications to selected students. 

In Older to prepare professional-school applications, each 
student assembles a file containing essential infomation. Mem- 
bers of the Premedical Evaluation Comnattee serve as rrentois 
for studeuts. The \Witing Center and the Career Center can pro- 
vide advice about writing personal statements and other docu- 
ments and interview practice. After the file, iiKhiding letters of 



recommendation, is assembled, a compreherKivc Prerredical 
Evaluation Committee letter of evaluation will be prepared to 
support the application. Inchided in the letter is a summary of 
the academic record and extracurricular activities, and an evalu- 
ation of commitment to a medical career. 

Premedical Curriculum 

Traditionally, premedical students have majored in fee natu- 
ral sciences. However, the medical professions are also seeking 
well-rourjded students with a broadly-based liberal education, 
reflecting ttie social, ethical, and cultural roles played by healtti 
care professionals. Studoits interested in medical careers may 
major in any field, but must make careful plans to take the nec- 
essary preparatory courses in a timely fashion 

Most health professional schools require certain foundation 
courses in science and nathematics, alcng with a fiill year of 
college-level writing. All science courses must include labora- 
tory corrponenls. Undergraduate students who wish to matricu- 
late at a professional school directly after graduation from 
American University must submit applications at the end of the 
junior year. Therefore, the basic requirements should be com- 
pleted in the fieshman and sophomore years, following the se- 
quence of courses listed below. 

Freshman Year 

BIO-1 10/BIO-l lOG General Biology 1 5: 1 (4) 
BIO-210/BK)-210O General Biology 5:2 (4) 
CHEM-llO/CHEM-llOG General Chemistry 1 5:1 (4) 
CHEM-21(yCHEM-210O General Chemistry D 5:2 (4) 
MATH-221 Calculus 1 (4) 
MATH-222 Calculus H (4) 
Sophomore Year 

BIO-300 Cell Biology with Laboratory (4) 
BIO-356 Gaieties with Laboratory (5) 
CHEM-3 10 Organic Chemistry I (3) 
CHEM-3 1 2 Origanic Chemistry I Laboratory ( 1 ) 
CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry II (3) 
CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (1) 
PHYS-1 1 0/PHYS-l 1 OG Univereity Physics I 5 : 1 (4) 
FHYS-210/PHYS-210G University Physics H 5:2 (4) 
This intensive plan also prepares students to take the Medi- 
cal College Adnisaons Test ^CAP) in the ^jring of their ju- 
nior year. 

To receive most favorable consideration, the Medkal Col- 
lege Admissions Test (MCAT) or Dental Aptitude Test (DAT) 
must be taken in the spring of the junior year, abord 1 6 months 
before matriculation in medical or dertal sdiool Veterinary 
schools typically require that the Graduate Record Exarrrination 
(GRE) be taken at flie end of flie junior year 

The above sequence presumes that a student has already de- 
cided by the beginning of his or ho* fre^iman year to pursue a 
prerrKdical course of study. Students who do not decide on a 
medical career until the middle of their uixiergtaduate studies or 
later may need to complete their fsemedical lequinanents dur- 
ing summers or in a post-baccalaureate year. 



164 College of Arte and Sciences 



Research and Internship Opportunities 

The pranedical program encourages ctose interaction with 
the faculty. Many undergraduates have engaged in independ- 
ent research projects in biology, chemistry, physics, and exper- 
imental psychology which have led to presentation and 
publication of papers. 

Many opportunities for intemshps, volunteer woik, and 
biomedical research are available. Local hospitals and clinics 
provide students with dinical experience. At institutions such 
as the National Institutes o f Ffealth and other local laboratories 
and biotechnology conpanies, students may gain &st-hand 
basic researdi experience in biochemistry, immunology, mo- 
lecular biology, and molecular genetics. 
Premedkal Achievement Prize and Scholarship 

The American University Hassa S. Shanker Premedical 
Adiievement Prize is a $1,000 cash award presented to flie 
mast outstanding undeigraduate student intending to apply to a 
health professional school who has taken at least five science 
and mathematics courses at American University. Selection is 
based on academic achievements, leadei^p qualities, and 
contributions to society or tfie health professions. AfjpUcants 
mist be planning to apply to medical, dental, or veterinary 
school, or to a program in the health sciences, sudi as physical 
therapy. 

The Joseitoie G. Gimble Scholarship is a $1,500 annual 
award to an undergraduate or postbaccalaiffeate student pre- 
paring for a carew in the allied health sciences. 

Postbaccaiaureate Premedical Certificate 

Certificate Coordinator Frederick W. Carson, 
Department of Chemistry, fcarson@americaaedu 
www.american.edu/cas'postbac.litml 

Postbaccaiaureate work consists of academic study under- 
taken after earning a bachelor's degree. American Uniwrsity's 
Postbaccaiaureate Premedical Certificate program is designed 
to coirplete basic lequieroents and strengthen credentials for 
appUcation to health (Hofesaonal schools of human medicine 
(M.D. or D.O.), dentistry (D.D.S.), veterinary medicine 
(D.V.M), podiatry (DPJvl.X optometry (OD.), and oral sur- 
gery (D.M.D.), and to advanced degree programs in the allied 
health sciences such as puHic health (M.P.H.) and physician 
assistant, nurse practitioner, and physical therapy programs 
leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degree. 

This program offers students extensive guidance and assis- 
tance in preparing for professional school and a career. With 
the he^p of advisors ttiey polish resume and essay-writing 
^dlls, prepare for the Medical CcJlege Aptitude Test (MCAF) 
or other admissions examinations, practice medical school in- 
terviews, select potential professional schools, and address re- 
lated financial issues. Throu^ the program, students may also 



attend seminars by health professionals, identify volunteer op- 
portunities, and be matdied with a mentor. Each emerges with a 
coccQXJsite letter of evaluation, held wiA letters of recommenda- 
tion in a personal file. The prenxdical programs coordinator 
sends these letters to professional schools for students and assists 
them in meeting all apfiication deadliiKs. 
Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree and a cuirulative 
grade point average of 3.20 (on a 4.00 scale) ovonll and in sci- 
eiKC and mMhenBtic courses, if taken. 
Course Requirements 

Basic Requirements 

The following courses are required for admission to medical 
school and to many other health professional schools. Once en- 
rolled ja the Postbaccaiaureate Premedical Certificate program, 
any of these courses not already corrpleted must be takai at 
American University. 

• BIO-1 10 General Biology I (4) 

• BIO-210 General Biology n (4) 

• CHEM-1 10 Goieral Chemistry I (4) 

• CHEM-210 General Chemistry n (4) 

• CHEM-3 10 Organic Chemistry I (3) 

• CHEM-3 12 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (1) 

• CHEM-320 Organic Chemistry n (3) 

• CHEM-322 Organic Chemistry n Laboratory (1) 

• MATH-221 Calculus I (4) 

• PHYS- 110 University Physics I (4) 

• PHYS-210 University Physics H (4) 

Certiflcate Requirements 

A minimum of 24 hours of course work taken ia residence at 
American University, including: 

• BIO-300 Cell Biology with Laboratory (4) 

• BK)-356 Genres with Laboratory (5) 

• One of the following sets of two courses: 
BIO-435 Vertebrate Physbtogy (5) and 
BIO-440 Microbiology (4) 

or 

CHEM-5eO Biochemistry I (3) and 

CHEM-561 Biochemistry n (3) 

• 6-9 (xedit hours fitim the Basic Requirements list above or the 
following 

BIO-200 Structure and Function of ttie Human Body (3) 

BIO-541 Cellular Imnunology (3) 

BIO-550 Devebpmaital Biology (3) 

BIO-583 Molecular Biology (3) 

MATH-222 Cafculus H (4) 

STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 



Bsychology 165 



Psychology 



Chair Anthony L. Riley 

Full-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritus E.M McGimiies,B. Slotnick 

Professor J J. Gray, DA. Haaga, B.W. McCarthy, 
S.R. Parter, A.L. Riky, AM. Silboterg, S.J. Weiss, 
B.T. Yates 

Associate Professor AH. Ahrens, M. Carter, BJ). Fantie, 
F. Z Peynircioglu, C.S. Wfeisdsrod 

Asastant Professor E. Cralley, M. Gomez-Serrano, 
K.C. Gunthert, L.M Juliano 

The undergraduate program in the Department of ftychol- 
ogyoffeisthestudert an opportunity to appreciate psychology's 
diversity and its appJications. Courses are offered in clinical, so- 
cial, personality, developmental, behavioral neuroacienoe, and 
experimental psy cholo gy. Advanced topics courses in these and 
related aieas aie often available. Students may design programs 
that approach psychology as a social science, a natural science, 
or a coirbination of the tvw . Advanced students have the oppor- 
tunity to become actively involved in both psychological re- 
search and paiaprofessional counseling. During their junior and 
senior years, majois are encouraged to take small, specialized 
seminars and engage in supervised independent study. Under- 
graduate majors also haw opportunities for internship experi- 
ence with community mental health agencies and may 
participate in ongoing research within the department. The pro- 
gram is sufficiently flexible and broad to satisfy career goals 
and provide a soUd background for graduate study. 

Students interested in careers such as those in research and 
teaching, mental health professions, and personnel and indus- 
trial psychology will want to choose curricula suited to their 
goals. The breadth of the field of psychobgy and ofthe depart- 
ment's course offerings make careM planning important. Stu- 
dents should consult their faculty advisors in planning their 
schedules. 

Affiliations 

Wadiington, DC. Veterans Administration Hospital; Balti- 
more Veterans Administration Hoqrital; St. Hizabeth's Hospi- 
tal; Comnimity Psychiatric Center, Bethesda, MD; Department 
of Ftediatrics, Georgetown University Hospital; Kennedy Insti- 
tute, Baltimore; Children's Ho^ital histitute ft>r Beha vicnal Re- 
sources; George Washington University Medical Center, Johns 
Hopkins University School of Medicine; Veterans Administra- 
tion Medical Center, Peny Point, MD; Alexandria Comniinity 
Mertal l^lth Center, )\bodhfum Center for Commmity Men- 
tal Healfli; and Department of Psychiatry, Eastern Virginia 
Medical School. 



B.A. in Psychology 



Admission to the Program 

Fornal admission to the major requires departmental ap- 
proval. 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or ttie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouises,oonsistingofonefouDdationcouiseand 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from each 
ofthe five curricular areas 

• No VKxe than 6 credit hours may be taken in the sartB 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 41 credit hours with grades ofC or better and at least 15 credit 
hours at the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• PSYC-105/PSYC-105G Psychobgy: Understanding 

Human Behavior 4:1 (3) 

• PSYC-1 1 5/PS YC-1 1 5G Psyshobgy as a Natural 

Science 5: 1(4) 

• SrAT-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• One course in Bio-Psjchology fiom the following: 
PSYC-240/PSYO-240G Drags and Bdiavior 5:2 (3) 
PSYC-318 Fiindamentals ofHinnm Neuropsychdogy (3) 
PSYC-325 Neurobiological Bases of Behavior (3) 
PSYC-360 The Evolution of Behavior (3) 

• One course in Learning and Cognition fiximthe following: 
PSYC-200/PSYC-220G Behavior Principles 5:2 (3) 
PSYC-220/PSYC-220G Tte Senses 5:2 (3) 
PSYC-300 Menmy and Cognition (3) 

PSYC-370 Learning and Bdiavior (3) 

• Two courses in the Individual, the Situation, and 
Psychological Health fiwmthe following: 

PS YC-205^PSYC-205G Social Psychology 4:2 (3) 
PS YC-21 5/PS YC-2 1 5G AbnomBl Psychology and 

Society 4:2 (3) 
PSYC-235/PSYC-235G Theories of I^rsonality 4:2 (3) 
PSYC-333 Healtii Psychology (3) 
PSYC-350 Child Psychology (3) 

• Psychology electives to conplete the required credit hoius 
Students will be advised concerning 300-500-level courses 
availaUe as electives. 

Note: No more than a combined total of 6 credit hours of 
PSYC-390 Independent Reading Course in Psychology, 



1 66 CoDege of Arts and Sciences 



PSYC-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience, 
PSYC-490 Independent Study Project in Psydiology, and 
PSYC-491 fatemship, will apply toward fulfilling major re- 
quirements. 
University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have ttie oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honcas work 
in the department and, upon departmental recomnendation, 
graduate with Urriveraty Honors in ftie major The depart- 
ment's Honors coordinator advises students in the University 
Honors Program regarding departmental options. 

Minor in Psychology 

• 22 credit houre with grades of C or better with at least 12 
credit hours unique to the rninw, and at least 9 credit hours at 
the 300 level or above 

Course Requirements 

• PSYC-105/PSYC-105GPsychobgy:Understaiding 

Human Behavior 4: 1 (3) 

• PSYC-115/PSYC-115GPBycl»logyasaNatural 

Science 5:1 (4) 

• 3 credit hours from Bio-Psychology or Learning and 
Cognition coinses (see major requirements above) 

• 3 credit hours fh)m the Individual, the Situation, and 
Psychological Health courses (see mqor requirements 
abow) 

• 9 additional credit hours in psjchology courses 

Combined B.A. and M.A. in Psychology 

Admission to the Program 

Students should apply for the program no later than the first 
sernester of te senior year and no earlier than the first semester 
of the junior year Students rtust have a minimum 3.00 grade 
point average in psychology and statistics courses and must 
have completed at least half of the credit hours required for ttie 
BA. in Psychology, including STf\T-202 Basic Statistics, be- 
fore applying to the program. Students must si±>mit a com- 
pleted graduate application form. Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) scores for the General examinatioa (Ver- 
bal, Quantity ve, and Analytic), two letters of recommenda- 
tion, and copies of all college transcripts. 

Degree Requirements 

• AU requirements for the B.A. in Psy^^ology 
Undergraduate students may appdy 6 credit hours of 
approved SOO-level coui^ work to satisfy the requirements 
of both degreea 

• All requirements for tiie MA. in P^chciogy , including a 
minimum of 24 credit hours cotipleted in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. 



M.A. in Psychology 



Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minirnum university requiranents 
for graduate study, appiicails must eam a satisfactory score on 
the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General examination. 
Admission is based on acadonic record, test scores, and two let- 
ters of recontnendation. 

Completion of the degree does not necessarily lead to admis- 
sion to the HlD. program; students who wish to be considered 
for the Ph.D. program must apply Applicants with a B.A. who 
wish to obtain a HiD. in Psychology fiom American University 
should apply directly to the Ph.D. {Hwgrami. If they do not have 
an M.A, students will eam one as part of the Fli.D. prograni See 
the desoiption of the FtD. program for more information. 

Up to 6 credit hours of graduate course wotk in psychology 
fhjm another university or up to 12 credit hours of graduate 
course credit taken at American Univasity may be transferred, 
provided that these credits were not counted toward another de- 
giee. These transfers of credit are subject to approval by the di- 
rector of the M.A program. 

Tracks 

General, Personality/Social, or E;q)erimBntal/Bicdogical 
Degree Requirements 

• 33 oedit hours of approved graduate woric 

• Written goieral comprehensive examination 

• Thesis option; The master's thesis involves an original 
research project. Students must prepare a thesis {XDposal, 
collect and analyze data, submit a written theas, and give an 
oral defense. The thesis must be accqited by the thesis 
committee, the department chair, and the university. 
Nonfiiesis option: availaUe only in the General Psychology 
track (see course requirements below). 

AH course woik for the thesis or nontiiesis option must be 
completed with grades of B or better. 
Course Requirements 
General P^chdogy 

• Two courses from the following: 

PSYC-505 Advanced Peraonality Psychology (3) 
PSYC-514 hidustrial/Or^nizational Psychology (3) 
PSYC-533 Cogiitiw Behavior Therapy (3) 
PSYC-540 Advanced Sodal Psychology (3) 
PSYC-545 Psychology of Sex Similarities and 

Differences (3) 
PSYC-551 Ps>chopathology: Theory and Research (3) 
PSYC-560 Advanced Child Psychology (3) 
PSYC-570 Behavioral Medkine (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) (peisonality/social 

psychology) 
PSYC-633 Psychological Assessment I (3) 

• Two courses fiom the following: 
PSYC-501 Physiological Psychology (3) 



ftydidogy 167 



PSYC-51 3 Neurophamiacdogy; The Biochemistry of 

Behavior (3) 
FSYC-5 1 8 Advanced Hunan Neuropsychology (3 ) 
PSYC-530 Conditioniig and Learning (3) 
PSYC-575 Advanced Memory and Cognition (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) 

(experimental/biological psychotogy) 
PSYC-618 Principles of Neuropsychobgical 

Assesanent (3) 
graduate setrinarin ejqjerimental psychology or 

neuroscienoe (3) 

• Graduate statistics cowse (3) 

Nonthesis Option (General I^;ychDlogy trad( only): 

• 6 credit hours ikm the following 
PSYC-550 Psyctological Research (3) 
PSYC-698 Directed Research (3-6) 

• 12 credit hours of graduate elective courses with at least 6 
credit hours fiomthe Department of ftychology 

Thesis Option: 

• PSYC-550 Psychological Research (3) 

• 6 credit hoiis from fee following 
PSYC-796 Master's Thesis Seminar (3) 
PS YC-797 Masta- 's Thesis Research (1 3) 

• 9 credit hours of graduate elective courses wife at least 6 
oedit hours from the Department of ftychology 

Personality /Social Psychology 

• Four courses from the following: 

PSYC-505 Advanced PersonaUty Psychology (3) 
PSYC-51 4 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3) 
PSYC-533 Cognitive Behavior Therapy (3) 
PSYC-540 Advanced Social Psychology (3) 
PSYC-545 Psychology of Sex Similarities and 
Differaices(3) 



PSYC-551 Psychopathology: Theory and Research (3) 
PSYC-560 Advanced Child Psychology (3) 
PSYC-570 Behavioral Medicine (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) ^jersonaUty/social 

psychc4ogy) 
PSYC-633 Psychological Assessment I (3) 
gradiiate serrinar in cUnical, personality, or social 

psychology (3) 

Two courses fiomthe following: 

PSYC-501 PhysiologKal Psychology (3) 

PS YC-5 1 3 Neurophannacology: The Biochemistry of 

Behavior (3) 
PSYC-5 1 8 Advanced Human Nairopsychdogy (3) 
PSYC-530 Conditioning and Learning (3) 
PSYC-575 Advanced Meirory and Cognition (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) 

(e!q>emnental/bicdogical psychobgy) 



PSYC-61 8 Principles ofNeuropsjchologjcal Assessmol (3) 
graduate seminar in experiiTKntal psychology or 
neuroscienoe (3) 

• PSYC-550 Psychological Research (3) 

• 6 credit hoirs fixxn fee following 
PSYC-796 Master's Thesis Seminar (3) 
PSYC-797 Master's Thesis Research (1-3) 

• Graduate statistics course (3) 

• Graduate elective course (3) 

Experimental/Biological Psychology 

• Four courses fiom fee following 
PSYC-501 Physiological Psychology (3) 

PSYC-5 1 3 Neurophamiacology: The Biochemistry of 

Behavior (3) 
PSYC-51 8 Advanced Hunan Newropsychdogy (3) 
PSYC-530 Conditioning and Learning (3) 
PSYC-575 Advanced Memory and Cognition (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) 

(experimental/biological psychotogy) 
PSYC-618 ftincples ofNeurops)chological AssessmaJ (3) 
PSYC-690 hidependent Study Project (3) in a recognized 

area of experimental/biological psychology 
graduate seminar in experirrBntal psychology or 

neuiDscience 

• Two courses fiomthe following: 

PSYC-505 Advanced PersonaUty Psyrfiology (3) 
PSYC-5 1 4 Industrial/Orgarrizational Psychology (3) 
PSYC-533 Cognitive Behavior Therapy (3) 
PSYC-540 Advanced Social Psychology (3) 
PSYC-545 Psychology of Sex Sinilarities and 

Difleraices(3) 
PSYC-551 Psychjpatlclogy: Theory and Research (3) 
PSYC-560 Advanced Child Psychology (3) 
PSYC-570 Behavioral Medicine (3) 
PSYC-597 Topics in Psychology (3) (personality/social 

psychology) 
PSYC-633 Psychalogical Assesanent I (3) 
graduate seminBr in clinical, personality, or social 

psychology (3) 

• PSYC-550 PsydBlogical Research (3) 

• 6 credit hours fiom fee following 
PSYC-796 Master's Thesis Seminar (3) 
PSYC-797 Mastff 's Thesis Researdi (1-3) 

• Graduate statistics course (3) 

• Graduate elective course (3) 

Ph.D. in Psychology 

There are two tracks wifein the doctoral program, clinical 
psydiology (APA accredited), and behavior, cognition and neu- 
rosdence. Students who have been admitted to fee doctoral pro- 
gram in psychology but do not have an MJ\. inpsyciiology that 
has been accepted by fee departmerl must cotrplete the degree 



168 College of Arts and Sciences 



requirements for tbe MA. in Psychology (tbesis(^on)befcre 
they can be awarded the doctorate. 

Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the minimum university require- 
ments fi)r graduate study, applicants nust earn a satisfectory 
score on the Graduate Record Eitamination (General and Ad- 
vanced Psydiology tests). Admiffiion is based on test scores, 
previous academic performance, and letters of recoirnienda- 
Hon. Those applicants to the clinical psychology track judged 
to be among the top 30 or 35 are invited for an interview, and 
the final selection is based on all infoniBtion, including the in- 
terview. Students are admitted for full-time study only. 

Tracks 

Clinical Psydiology or Behavior, Cognition and Neuroscience 

(BCAN) 

Degree Requirements 

• 72 aedit hours of approved graduate woric 

• Two tools of research are required but do not result in comse 
credit toward 4ie degree. The tool requirement is flexible and 
can be met in a variety of ways: 

1) demonstraticn ofknowledgeof a language relevant to fee 
student's career, 

2) demonstration of mastery in a conqjuter program 



3) satisfactory conpletion of one skill-oriented ffadaste 
couree offered by another departmoit at American 
University or by nonpsychology departments of the 
Consortium universities; 

4) participation in one cUnical institute which is 
approximately equal in time and difficulty to a Ml course; 
and 

5) supervised tool training in (<her setting? when approved 
by the student's advisor and ttie department chair. 

• Four coinprehensive examinations outlined by advisors or 
other faculty members. These are tasks which involve 
students in the kinds of activities they will later engage in as 
professional psychologists. At least one of the four 
conprehensives must be oral and at least two rtust be 
written. 

• Dissertation: A written proposal for the dissertation is to be 
submitted to the dissertation committee by the middle of flie 
second semesto- of tbe third year. The original proposal, or a 
reviaon thereof, should meet the requirements of the 
committee by the end of the second semester of the third 
year. This allows adequate time for corr^iletion of a quality 
dissotatian even if initial experimaitatiQn turns out to be 
exploratory in nature. The disaertaticm must be accepted by 
the dissertation committee, the department chair, and flie 
university. 

• Clinical Psychology track: As part of the doctoral clinical 
track requirements, clinical studaits serve a one-year 
intemdiip in an appropriate setting outside the university. 



Course Requironents 
Clinical Psychology 

• PSYC-502 History and Systems of Psychology (3) 

• PSYC-550 Psjchological Research (3) 

• PS YC-5 5 1 Psychopathology: Theory and Research (3) 

• PSYC-618PrinciplesofNeuropsyrfiological Assessment (3) 
or assesstient course approved by the depiartment 

• PSYC-630 Psychotherapy Theory, Researdi, and 

Practice (3) 

• PSYC-633PsychologicalAssessmentI(3) 

• PS YC-652 Assessment of Intellectual Function and 

Personality (3) 

• PSYC-680 Experiential Psychotherapy Practiann I (3) 

• PSYC-681 Experiential F^chother^y Practicum n (3) 

• PSYC-710 Behavior Therapy Practicum(3) 

• PSYC-791 Psjchodynamic Psychottierapy Practicum I (3) 

• PSYC-792 Ps>chodynamic Psychottierapy Practicum II (3) 

• One course in Biological Bases of Behavior from the 
following 

PSYC-501 Physiological Psydiology (3) 

PSYC-5 1 3 Neuwpharmaoology: The Biodienistiy of 

Behavior (3) 
PSYC-5 18 Advanced Human Neuropsychology 

• Onecourse in Cognitive-Aflective Bases ofBehavicrfromthe 
following 

PSYC-530 Conditioning and beaming (3) 
PSYC-575 Advanced Memory and Cognition (3) 

• One course in Individual Bases of Behavior fi^m the 
following 

PSYC-505 Advanced PeisonaHty Psychology (3) 
PSYC-560 Advanced Child Psychology (3) 

• One course in Social Bases of Behavior from fee followiig: 
PSYC-521 Ethnic aol Minority Issues (3) 

PSYC-540 Advanced Sodal Psychology (3) 
PSYC-545 Psychology of Sex Diffaences (3) 

• 6 credit hours from ttie following: 
PSYC-798 Doctoral Dissertation Soninar (3) 
PSYC-799 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9) 

• 6 credit hours of statistics 

Behavior, Cognition and Neuroscience 

• 6 credit hours of PS YC-598 Neuroscience Seminar (3) 

• 18 credit hours from the following: 
PSYC-501 Physiological Psychology (3) 
PSYC-5 13 Neuropharmacology (3) 
PSYC-518 Advanced Human Neuropsychology (3) 
PSYC-530 Conditioning and Learning (3) 
PSYC-551 Psychopathology: Theory and Research (3) 
PSYC-560 Advanced Chfld Psychology (3) 
PSYC-575 Advanced Memory and Cognition (3) 
PSYC-6 18 Principles ofNeuropsychdogical Assessment (3) 



Sociology 1 69 



Oflier courses focusing in the neuroscienoes may be taken 
with approvBl of the student's advisor and the Graduate 
Curriculum Committee. 

• 6 credit hoirs from the following 
PSYC-798 Doctoral Dissertation Seminar (3) 
PSYC-799 Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9) 

• 6 credit hoiKS of statistics 



• 12 credit hours of electives 

• 24 credit hours of lab research 
Special Opportunities 

• Research qjportunities in laboratories at the National 
Institutes of Health and related research institutions are 
available fcH- students in both experimental and clinical 
pBycbdogy. 



Sociology 



Chair Russell Stone 

FuU-Time Faculty 

Professor Emeritin/a B. H. Kaplan, Q K Mueller, 

K. K. Petersen, J C. Scott, J. K Siegenlhaler, A. Van derSbce 

Professor R Chow, K. Kusterer, R. Stone 

Associate Professor A. Bremiei; B. J. Dickerson, 

K. Macharia, GA. Young 

Assistant Professor G Blank, C. Pascale, S Vidal-Ortiz 

Scbolars-in-Hesidence M. A. Fay, R Lengeiman, 

J. Neibrugge-Brantley 

Sociology explores how individuals, teougji their coDectiw 
actions, oeate and change patterns of social rdaticns and how, 
in turn, these social relations influence people's lives. Sociolo- 
gists focus on ttiree maJOT levels of analysis, from whole societ- 
ies as component parts of wider systans, to institutions as 
component sectors of society, to individuals as participants in 
two-person groups. They also study varied processes of social 
change, from migration to social mobility, from urbanization to 
mass commumcation. Finally, sociologists study a wide variety 
of themes, from racial and ethnic relations to social problems 
and political change. This quest forknowledgeis both an end in 
itself and a pattiway ibr informed social change. 

The Deparlmait of Sociotogy of flie CoUege of Arts and 
Sciences shares a comrtDn ptirpose of education and research 
for social justice in an increasingly ^obal social system. Faculty 
and students are enpo wered to participate in building equitable, 
humane, and sustainable social institutions by creating socio- 
logical knowledge and applying professional reseoch ddlls to 
produce effective policies and programs for social change. One 
souice of its strength is the departmHit's multicultural diversity, 
which its mercbers take every opportunity to expand. 

The Sociology Department serves the univeraty, includrng 
students from throughout the \Morld, as a center for the study of 
societal change, social institutions, and sccial processes, with an 
en^ihasis on inequality and social justice. E)egree programs 
consist of core training in sociological theory and research 
mettiods, as well as courses in concentrations including race, 
gender, aid social justice; global sociology; social inequality, 
gender and family; and applied sociology /social policy. The 
programs focus on fbrmsof inequality, their origins and patterns 
or refxxxluction, related to issues of social justice, and how these 



issues vary within and betweai societies They are intended to 
produce and apply knowledge for the benefit of society — nc< 
only to teach academic skills, but also to develop knowledge of 
value to ftiose involved in woridng for the promotion of social 
equality. The programs prepare students for a veiriety of careers 
in social advocacy, research, teaching, human services, and 
both pubbc and private sector policy-making institutions. Suc- 
cessful placements of the department's graduates in academic, 
research, and policy-making institutions attest to the high stan- 
dards our graduates meet 

The departmait's focus on international and comparative 
sociology and its program in social policy analysis are espe- 
cially well suited to Washington, D.C. — en international capital 
and center for pohcy making. American University's k)caticn 
provides unparalleled access to government, research institu- 
tions, data and archival sources, advocacy carganiaitions, and 
leaders involved in social change. 

The undo'graduate program is unique ki its em{iiasis on 
race, gender, social justice, global social chaige and apphed 
sociology/social policy. Majors and minors take core course se- 
qumces in sociological theory and researdi methods, and 
couises from several areas of concentration. 

The Department of Sociology's graduate program conasts 
of core training in sociological dieoiy andresearch nsfliod, plus 
an area of concentration in race, gender, and social justice; 
global sociology; social inequality; gender and femily; or sp- 
plied/professional sociology/social policy. The program nc* 
only teaches academic skills, but also develops knowledge of 
benefit to those working for ttie promotion of social equahty. 
Course are designed to enable students to deepen feeir knowl- 
edge of a spedalty area, to develop advanced and systematic 
theoretical understoiding and to develop methodological areas 
for vocational and professional competence. 

B.A. in Sociology 

Admission to the Program 

ForrtHl admission to the mqor requires dq>aitnaBnt ap- 
proval. 

University Requirements 

• Atotal of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 



1 70 Colle ge of Arte and Scicsces 

• 3 credit hours of college nBtbematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Reqidreinents 

• A total often courses, consisting of one foundation course 
and one second-level course in an approved sequence from 
each of the five cunicular areas 

• No tnore than 6 credit hours may be taken in the sane 
disc^jhne 

Major Requirements 

• 43 o^it hours with grades of C or better, no more than 1 3 
credit hours may be at the 100 or 200 level 

Course Requirements 

• SOCY-1 50/SOCY-l 50G Global Sodology 4: 1 (3) 

• SOCY-315Mqor Social Theorists (3) 

• SOCY-330 hitroduction to Social Research (3) 

• SOCY-491 hiternship (3) 
or 

SOCY-392 Cooperative Education Field Experience (3) 
or an approved equivalent experience 

• SOCY-492 Major Research Seminar (3) 

• 3 credit hours of advanced theory from the following: 
SOCY-4 15 Cunent Issues in Social Theory (3) 
SOCY-5 15 Models of Societal Devdopment (3) 

• 3 credit hours of advanced research methods from ttie 
following 

SOCY-525 Sodal Advocacy and Change (3) 

SOCY-580 Social Pdicy Analysis (3) 

or other methods course a;^jroved by the advisor 

• STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• 1 8 oedtt hours in sociology electives, wifli no more flian 
two courses at flie 1 00 or 200 level, and at least one course 
at 4» 500 level Students ^ould take at kast cne course 
from four of the following concentrations: 

Race, Gender, and Social Justice 

Global Sociology/Regional Studies 

Social Inequality 

Gender and Family 

Applied Sociology/Social Policy 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Program have fee oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Horors in the major To do 
so, students complete 12 hoirs of advanced-level Honors work 
in the department and, upon departmental recomnendatian, 
graduate with University Honors in ttie major. The depart- 
ment's Honors coordinator advises students in the University 
Hcmois Program regarding departmental options. 
Honor Society 

Membership in the American University chapter of A^ha 
Kappa Delta, the international honor society in Socidogy, is 
open to qualifying majors. The society q)onsors lectures and 



o&er activities that involve undergraduates in the professional 
workings ofthe discipline. 

Minor in Sociology 

• 21 ciBdithourswithgradesofCorbetterwithjtleast 12ctBdil 
houis unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• SOCY-1 50/SOCY-150G fflobal Sodology 4: 1 (3) 

• SOCY-315 Mqor Social TTieorists (3) 

• SOCY-320 hitiDduction to Social Research (3) 

• 3 credit hours ofadvancedtheory or research methods from the 
following 

SOCY-415 Current Issues in Social Theory (3) 
SOCY-5 15 Models of Societal DevelopjiKnt (3) 
SOCY-525 Social Advocacy and Change (3) 
SOCY-580 Sodal Pohcy Analysis (3) 

• 9 credit hours in sodology electives, wi4i no more than one 
couise at ttie 1 00 or 200 level. Students should take cne course 
from three of the following concentrations: 

Race, Gender, and Social Justice 

Global Sociology 

Social Inequality 

Gender and Family 

Applied Sociology/Social Policy 

Combined B.A. and M.A. in Sociology 

Admission to the Program 

Students ^Kuld appXy for this program in the second semes- 
ter of ttie junior year. Students mist have a minimum overall 
3 .00 grade point average. Admissions decisions to the combined 
program follow the same procedures and standards used to eval- 
uate graduate ap^^cants to the MA. Students iiterested in ap- 
plying to this combined program should consuh with ftieir 
advisor and ottier faculty members before formal qjphcation is 
begun. 
Requirements 

• All requirements for the B.A. in Sodology 
Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours of aj^noved 
5004evel course work in sociology, including STAT-514 
Statistical Methods, to satisfy the requirements of both 



• All requirements for the M.A in Sociology, including a 
minimum of 24 credit hours conpleted in residence in 
graduate status after the undergraduate degree has been 
awarded. 



M.A. in Sociology 



Admission to the Program 

Applicants trust meet the minimum univeraty requiranents 
for admission to graduate study, including a badiebr's degree 
fium an accredited institution, with at least a 3.3 (on a 4.0 scale) 



Sociology 171 



grade point average. Graduate Record Hxamination (GRE) ted 
scores are required. A background in the social sciences is 
strongly preferred. Admissiontotheprograniisat the discretion 
of the departrrBnt's Graduate Committee and is based on aca- 
demic record and letters of reoommsndation from two persons 
able to evaluate the af)pKcant's potential for graduate study in 
socblogy. Pnavisional admission may be considered on a 
case-by -case basis where tniniinum university requiremraits are 
not Mlymet. 
Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work, includiig the 
research retfiirement 

• Tool of research: STXr-514 Statistical Methods, or another 
^^roved graduate-level statistics or spedalized methods 
course 

• One written comprehensive examination covering 
sociological theory and meftiods of social leseanii: 

The exam is taken after conpletion oftwo theory courses and 
tvM3 researdi mettiods courses. Full-time students must take 
the exan before begiming their second year in &e prc^ram 
Students who have taken prior relevant course work in 
sociology may opt to tdce the exam before taking the required 
courses. After taking the related courses, a tiBxiniim oftwo 
atterrqjts of the exam are pamitted. 

• Research requirement: 

SOC Y-797 Master's Thesis Independent Study (3 or 6 credit 
hours) 

The thesis offers students the oiqx)rtunity to specklize as wdl 
as fiff&er develop research skills Students chose fte subject 
of flie thesis in consultation with their advisor. 
or 

SOC Y-795 Master's Research: Independeit Study (3) 
Completion of a substantial research report related to the 
student's field of concentration under the guidance of a 
professor of tiie studert's choice. 

Advanced courses in research me&ods, an advanced semiiiar 
in the student 's fidd of concentration, ch' an independeot study 
course in the field of oonc«itraticBi (3) 
All course work taken for ftie researdi requirenoBnt mist be 
taken with grades of B or better. 
Course Requtremeots 

• SOCY-610 History of Sociological Theory (3) 

• SOCY-61 1 Modem Sociological Theory (3) 

• SOCY-620 Social Research I (3) 

• SOCY-621 Social Research n (3) 



• SrAT-514 Statistical Methods (3) 

• SOCY-795 Master's Research: IndepsndetJ Study (3) 
or 

SOCY-797 Master's fhesis hidependent Study (1 -6) 

• 9-12 credit hours from one of the foUowing concentiations, 
chosen in consultation with the student's adviasr. Lists of 
approved courses for cotKentrations are available from the 
Sociotogy Department 

Race, Gender, and Social Justice 

Global Sociology 

Social Inequality 

Gender and Fam ily 

Applied Sociology/Social Policy 

• 6-9 credit hours in approwd etective courses, including a 
3-credit hour intemshq) 

Graduate Certificate in Social Research 

Admission to the Program 

Open to students with a bachelor's degree or equivalent fiom 
an accredited institution. 
Certificate Requrements 

• IScredit hours of apjSDvedcotrrse work wifli at least 6 credit 
hours at the 6004evel or above, with grades of C or better 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses are rwt 
accepted toward the fiilfillment of certificate requirements, 
althou^ these grades will be included in the calculationof the 
QPA. Students mist have at least a 3.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Studaits in 
certificate prograns mist take a mfnirrum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-nBnth period and conplete the certificate in 
four years. International students must enroll in 9CTedithouis 
each semester (except for summar). Amaximumof 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited cdlege or university may be 
£^lied toward the certificate as transfer credit 

Prerequisite 

• SIAT-Sl 4 Statistical Methods (3X or other graduate-level 
statistics course, or statistics exanination 

Course Requirements (15 credit hours) 

• SOCY-^20 Social Research I (3) 

• SOCY-621 Social Research D (3) 

• 9cTedithoursfiTQmgraduat&-levdsociologycouisesseJected 
in consultation with the graduate director. Courses outside tiie 
Sociology Etepartment may substituted with the qjproval of 
the graduate director 



172 College of Arts and Sciences 



Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) 



Directar Naomi S. Baron 
Coordinator Brock Brady 

The demand for teachers of English to speakers of other 
languages has markedly irKreased as changing natiorsd sys- 
tems and gk)bal concerns have created an interdependent 
world. Amoican University's TESOL program is distinctive 
in its locus on experiential learning — students plan lessons, 
observe classes, and design tests for F.nglish language classes. 
Faculty draw on ttieir extensive teaching experience, research, 
and interaction with ottier cultures to jMDvide pragnutic les- 
sons and advice to TESOL students. 

AU offers a variety of opportunities in TESOL including a 
combined Bachelor's/MA. program, anM. A in TESOL (with 
a joint AU/Fteace Corps pjt)grarr^, and a oertifkate qjen to 
both undergraduate and graduate studaits. An ESOL track is 
availaHe in ttie M AT. program and a graduate teaching certif- 
icate (see the School of Education, Teaching and Health for 
more infontBtion). In addition, the program offers an annual 
TESOLSunmer Institute, which includes regularsummer ses- 
sion classes plus an intensive workshop. 

Combined Bachelor's Degree and 

M.A. in TESOL 

This program enables quahfied students to can both an un- 
do-graduate degree (in any field) and an M.A. in TES(X 
(Teaching English to Speakers ofOther Languages). The com- 
bined program can be completed with four years of undergrad- 
uate study and 12 months of additional study (fall and spring 
sanesters phis the Summer TESOL Institute). The program of- 
fas students an opportunity to gain both the theoretical badc- 
giDund and practical skills necessary to teach English abroad 
or to adults in the United States. 

Note: This program is not designed forK-12ES(X. licensure. 
Admission to the Program 

The standards for admission as defined by the relevant un- 
da-graduate teaching unit's requiremaits mist first be satis- 
fied. Undergraduates should apply for admission to the 
combirKd program by the end of the junior year. 

Undergraduates whose overall grade point average is 3.00 
or higher wiH be considered for the corcbined program. AppH- 
cations must be aoconqanied by two letters of academic refer- 
ence and a statenent of purpose. 

Studaite ^ould discuss their interest in &e program with the 
TESOL MA director before submitting a formal appUcatioa 
Requirements 

• AllrequirementsforaBAorB.S. inanymajorat American 
Uniwrsity 

• All requirements forthe MA. in TESOL 

Students may use up to 6 credit hours of course work at the 500 
level or above from the TESOL program to satisfy the require- 



ments for both degrees. These courses may represent either 
undergraduate mqor requirements or electives. 

M.A. in TESOL (Teaching English to 
Speakers of Other Languages) 

Aflmission to the Program 

AppUcants to the master's program in TESOL are subject to 
the minimum university requirements for admission to graduate 
study. Further, a grade point average of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) in 
the undergraduate major. Graduate Record Exarrrination (OlE) 
scores, and two letters of academic reference are required. It is 
strongly recomrrKnded that native ^}eaka^ of English have 
some background in at least one other language, hitetnatianal 
students are expected to demonstrate competence in English 
equivalent to a score of 600 or better on the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). Part-time as well as fiill-time stu- 
dents are welcome in the program. 

A joint program between tiie Peace Cops and American Uni- 
versity enables participants to prepare for ftace Corps Fji glish 
teaching assignments wMe eamrng an MA. in TESOL. Appiica- 
tion is made separately to American University and ftie Fteace 
Corps. Admission requirements forthe MA. program are the snne 
as above. The Peace Corps accepts Arrraican citizens only and 
participants mist meet all other Peace Corps requirHnenls prior to 
beginning Peace Corps service. Suoces^ul participants will begin 
their Peace Corp training and service after ttiey have corrpleted flie 
bulk of their academic work. The Peace Corps service expaience 
constitutes the equivaloit of a 6-credit hour interrdiip, for wliich 
the tuition is waived. Abo, TESL-620 may be waived for students 
in the AU/Peace Corps program, for a total of 33 credit hours for 
the degree. 

Nole.- This program is not designed for K-12 ESOL licaisure. 
K-12 pubhc school Ucaisure (or certification) in ESOL is avail- 
aHe through the MAT track in &rglish for Speakers of Other 
Languages (ESOL). For rrwre information, see the Sdiool ofEd- 
ucation, Teadiing and Healtti programs. 
Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved TESOL course work 

• Corripletion of a teadiing portfoUo oort^iled during course of 
study 

• Anoralconprehensiveexaminationtakenaflercotrpletianof 
all required course work and the teaching portfoUo 

• Thesis or nonthesis option 
Course Requirements 

Core Courses (27 credit hours) 

• TESL-500 Principles of Linguistics (3) 

• TESL-501EngJish Language Teaching I (3) 

• TESL-502 En^dsh Language Teaching n (3) 

• TESL-503StruchireofEn^sh(3) 



Teaching Englmh to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) 1 73 



• TESL-522 Language Acquisition (3) or 

TESL-523 Second Language Acquisition (3) 

• TESL-531 Language Assessment (3) 

• TESL-541 Teaching dammar (3) or 

TESL-542 Teaching Rtmunciation (3) 

• TESL-620 English Language Teaching HI (3) (waived for 
students in flie AU/Peace Corps program) 

• One ofthe following: 

ANTH-537 Topics in Language and Culture (3) 
ANTH-544 Topics in Public Anthropology: 

Anthropology of Education (3) 
TESL-527 Cultural Issues in the ESL^EFL aasaoom (3) 
or otha- approved couise dealing with language and 
sociocultural issues 
Eiectives (9 credit hours) 

• Three coiffses as approved by the student's advisor fiom the 
following: 

ANTH-537 Topics in Lfinguage and Culture (3) 

(if not taken in core) 
ANTH-544 Topics in Public Anttiropotagy: 

Anthropology of Education (3) (if not taken in core) 
SOC Y-645 Global and Multicultural Education (3) 
TESL-504 Language Analysis (3) 
TESL-522 Language Acquiation (3) (if not taken in core) 
TESL-523 Second Language Acquisition (3) 

(if not taken in core) 
TESL-524 Reading and Writing in the ESUEFL 

Classroom (3) 
TESL-527 Cultural Issues in the ESLEFLaasaw)m(3) (if 

not taken in core) 
TESL-528 Bilingual Education (3) 
TESL-531 Language Assessment (3) 
TESL-541 Teaching Qrammar (3) (if not taken in core) 



TESL-542 Teaching FVonunciation (3) (if not taken in core) 
TESL-545 Curriculum and Materials Design (3) 
TESL-554 Technology for Language Learning 

and Teaching (3) 
TESL-560 TESOL Topics (1-3) 
rESL-691 Internship (1-6) 
TESL-693 Fteaoe Corps Internship (6) (required for students 

in the AU/Fteace Corps program) 

• Thesis option; completion of TESI^-797 Master's Thesis 
Seminar (6) in lieu of 6 hours of eiectives listed above (the 
thesis option is not available to students in flie AU/Peace 
Corp)s program) 

Nonthesis option; 9 elective credit hours 

Grades o f B or better are required for all courses taken for the 

thesis or nonthesis option. 

Certificate in TESOL (Teaching English 
to Speakers of Other Languages) 

AdmissioD to the Program 

A grade point aven^ of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) is required. 
Intematicnal students must demonstrate oottfietence in EngUfh 
equivalent to a score of 600 orabow in ftie Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL). 

Course Requirements (15 credit hours) 

• TESL-500RiQc^les of Linguistics (3) 

• TESL-501 EngU^ Language Teaching I (3) 

• TESL-502 EngUA Language Teaching H (3) 

• Two approved TESOL courses 

'Note: This piogramis not designed forK-12ESCSL liomsure. 



174 College of Arts and Sciences 

Women's and Gender Studies 



Director Gay Young 

Faculty from other scImoIs and departments of Ibe university 
teach in flie program. A list of the feculty mertfcers of flie 
Wjmen's and Gender Studies Advisory Board and other pro- 
gram infoniBtion is available at: 
www.american.edu/cas^department women 

The Wcmen's and Gender Studies Program is an interdisci- 
plinary program focused on women's experiences, issues fac- 
ing women in the world today, and the significance of gender 
in^iaping the experience ofcommmities and individuals. The 
program is committed to a milticultural curriculum that sus- 
tains and integrates diverse perspectives. Women's and gender 
studies courses emphasize participatory education in which 
student involvemeal, critical linking, and personal insight are 
encouraged and made relevant in the teaming process. Many 
faculty menfcers with national reputations for their vwrk in 
gender issues regularly teach these courses. Their students 
bene fit directly firm the expertise of women and men who are 
leaders in this field of scholarship. 

In addition to the womsn's and gender studies major and 
minor pxjgrams for undergraduates, graduate studaits can 
combine the study of women's and gender issues with the cere 
courses in a traditional discipline to earn an MA. or PhD. de- 
gree. Graduate programs participating in this program include 
arthropology, art, economics, education, history, international 
relatioTB, literature, psychology, and sociology. 

Students who major or minor in women's and gender stud- 
ies gain expaience ofi"-campus throu^ a cooperative educa- 
tion or intemship placement in an organization or agency 
whose mission erri^raoes some aspect of womai's lives and 
e;q)eriaK>es or of gender issues. Interns and co-op students are 
actively sou^t by organizations focused on the arts, advocacy, 
business, communications, employment and training issues, 
international rights, law, policy, U.S. politics, reproductive 
ri^ts and health, research, and support services. Students have 
access to powerful networics that can give substantial support 
in care«- development at organistions in Washington, D.C. 
such as the Institute for Women 's PoUcy Studies, the National 
Organization for Women, the Women's Legal Defense Fund, 
the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, Amnesty Intema- 
tiooal, ortheNaticoal MuseumofWomen in the Arts. Students 
also have the opportunity to research women's and gmder is- 
sues in the many government and nor^xofit orgaoizations lo- 
cked in the nation's capital. 

The program hosts major speakers, performances, and lec- 
ture series on carrpus. These have included an international 
conference on women and collective rremory, lectures by Gto- 
ria Steinem, bell hooks, and Kary Kennedy-Cuomo, and a 
faculty discussion on gender and curriculum transfonn;iion In 
additicm, American Urriversity's Washington College of Law 
publishes the Journal of Gender and the Law. 



A degree in women's and goider studies may lead to a chal- 
lenging career in such areas as policymaking, the arts, health is- 
sues, social work, teaching, business, or politics. An 
undergradu^e mqor or minor in women's and gendw studies 
prepares students for graduate school or a variety of professions, 
including law, medicine, science and technology, public pciicy 
or public service, and education. 

B.A. in Women's and Gender Studies 

Admission to the Program 

ForrrBl admission to the rrajor requires a grade point average 
of 2.00 (on a 4.00 scale) and the approval of fee f)rogram director 

University Requirements 

• A total of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

Women's and gender studies majors are advised to take 
STAr-202 Basic Statistics to fiilfill the University Mathematics 
RequiranerrL 

General Education Keqinrements 

• Atotal often courses, corsisting of one foundation course and 
one aecond-le vel course in an approved sequence firm each of 
the five cmricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
disc^jline 

Major Requirements 

• 39 credit hours with grades ofC or better, including St least 18 
credit hoiffs at the 300 \eve\ or above 

Course Requir^nents 

• WGSr-125/WGST-125G Gender in Society 4:1 (3) 

• WGST-150/WGST-150G Women's Voices tiuDU^ 

Tim 2: 1(3) 

• WGSr-300 Feminist and Gender Theory (3) 

• WGST-392 Coopentive Education Field Experience (3) or 
WGSr-491 hitonsh^) in WsnHi's and Gender Studies (3) 

• WGST-SOO Current Issues and Research in Women's 

and Gender Studies (3) 

• One course on women and/or gender in multicultinal 
perspective fitmi ftie following 

ANTH-215/ANrH-215G Sex, Gender, and Culture 3:2 (3) 
JWSrr-320 Topics in Jewish Culture (3) (approved tc^ic) 
SOCY-235/SOCY-235G V^men in the Thnd Wwld 3:2 (3) 
WGST- 350 Interpreting Gender in Culture (3 ) (^rproved 

topic) 
or another course approved by the program director 



Women's and Goider Studies 1 75 



Area of Focus (12 credit hours) 

12 credit hours (9 of which trust be at (he 300 lewl or above) 
from one of three options; Arts and Humanities, Social 
Sciences, or an individually defined theme or issue 
Note: ttie same couree may not be used to siiisfy' botti the 
women and/or gender in multicultural perspective 
requirement (see above) and the Area ofFocus requirement . 
Arts and Humanities 
AMST-334 Contemporary American Culture (3) (approved 

topics) 
ARTH-335 Twetiieth Century Wsmen Artists of the 

Americas (3) 
ARTH-520 Seminar in Art History (3) (approved topics) 
EDU-31 9 Children's Literature: Multicultural and 

International Approaches (3) 
EDU-565 Qenda- and CultUBl Diversity in School (3) 
HIST-220/H1ST-220O Women in America 4:2 (3) 
HIST-332 Contenporary Historical Studies (3) (approved 

topics) 
HIST-358 Vfcmai in America to 1 8 50 (3) 
HIST-359 \M5nMi in America, 1850 to Present (3) 
HIST-379 Topics in African Amaican History: 
African American Women; Nineteenfrk 
Century American Voices (3) 
HIST-500 Studies in Mstory (3) (approved topics) 
JWST-320 Topics in JewiA Culture (3) (^3|Hoved topes) 
Lrr-310 Mqor Authors (3) (approved topics) 
LIT-370 Topics in Women and Gendw Studies (3) 
RHIL-31 6 Feminist Philosophy (3) 
SPAN-5 59 OoUoquitim on Latin America (3) (taught in 

Spani^) (approved topics) 
WGST-350 hiteipreting Gaider in Culture (3) (approved 

topics) 
or other courses jpproved by the program director 
Social Sciences 

ANTH-215/AKrH-215G Sex, Geaia-, and Culture 3:2(3) 
COMM-510 Wcanen in Joimalian (3) 
COMM-534Race, Gmderand the Media (3) 
BCON-374 Gender Roks in the Economy (3) 
BCON-574 WonBn in the Economy (3) 
GOVT-482 Women anl PoHtics (3) 
GOVT-483 Women, Politics, and Public Policy (3) 
GOVT-484 Women and Political Leadershp (3) 
GOVT-485 Topics in WotiKi and Politics (1 -4) 
GOVT-486 Feminist Fblitical Theory (3) 
HFrr-245/HFIT 24 5G Gender, Culture and Heaih 4:2 (3) 
HFIT-323 Issues in Women's Health (3) 
JLS-526 Domestic Vidence (3) 
JLS-535 Gender and flie Law (3) 
PSYC-320 Women anl Mental Hsalth(3) 
PSYC-430 Human Sexual Behavior (3) 



PSYC-545 ftydidogyof Sex Similarities and Diflfaenoes (3) 

SIS-517 Gender and Conflict (3) 

SIS-559 Selected Topics in Cross-National Studies (3) 

(appto\ie<i topics) 
SOCY-205/SOCY-205G Th; Family 4:2 (3) 
SOC Y-235/SOCY-235G Women in the Third Wot« 3:2 (3) 
SOCY-352 Wontn, Men anl Social Oiange (3) 
SC)CY-570 Sociology of Gender and Family (3) 
SPAN-356 Danish Topics (3) (taight in Spanisii) 

(approved topics) 
WGST-225/225G Gender, RaUtics and Povwer 4:2 (3) 
WGST-350 Interpreting G«nder in Culture (3) (approved 

topics) 
or other courses approved by the program director 
IndividuaUy Defined Area ofFocus 
An individually defined group of four courses (12 credit 
hours) cental oo a paticular theme or issue in women's and 
gender studies, with approval of the program director 
Electives (9 credit hours) 

• Electiw courses fixiused on women and/or gender studies, to 
make atotalof39CTedit hours, firm a list of couraes approved 
each semester by the program director 

University Honors Program 

Studaits in the Um\«rsity Hcmcts Progiamhaw the qjpoitu- 
nity to graduate witti University Honars in tiie irqor To fiifiH re- 
quiiements for University Honors in Womai's and Gender 
Studies, sttideits may enroll in honors cciloquia wifli topics fo- 
cused on women's and/or gender studies, or may arrange sn 
Honors supplement to a regular couree or an Hcnors indepeodat 
study in women's jnd gender studies. All students cortplete a 
two-semester seniw year Honas sequence in WGST-500 Curteit 
Issues and Researdi in WjrrKn's and Gender Studes (with ai 
Homrs sipplanent) and WGSr-498 Honois Project in Women's 
and Gender Studies. The progran director advises students in 4e 
University Honors Fk)gian regarding program options. 

Minor in Women ^s and Giender Studies 

• IScredithouiswilhgradesofCcH-betterwithatleast 12credit 
hours mique to flie minor 

Course Requirements 

• WGST-1 25/WGCT-l 25G Gender in Society 4: 1 (3) 

• WGST-300Femimst and Gender Theory (3) 

• WGST-392 Cooperative Edication Field Bqjeriaice (3) or 
WGST-491 Intanshq) in Women^ and Gendra- Sudies (3) 

• 9 credi hours of course wotk, 6 of which mist be at the 300 
level or above, from a list of women's studies courses 
approved by the program director 

CoiBult the program director for each semester's approved 
couise offerings in Women's and Genda' Studies. 



Kogod School of Business 

• Administration and Faculty 

• Undergraduate Programs 

• Graduate Programs 



Dean Ridiard M. Durand 

ScniorAssociateDeanforAcackniic Affairs Kathleen Getz 

Associate Dean for Administration Firouz Bahranpour 

Assistant Dean for Budget Administration Mariamie Kiell 

Associate Dean for Academic Programs Lawrence P. Ward 

Senior Director of Enrollment Man^emcnt Sondia Smith 

Assistant Director of G^duateAdmissioos Kristin Vohnar 

Undergraduate Admissions and Marketing Manager 

Judith E. Byers 

Director of Undergraduate Programs Jesse Boeding 

Undergraduate Academic Advisors 

Katie Boggs, Jonathan Post 

Assistant Directors of Graduate Programs 

Clare tta Jackson, Jennifer Helvik 

Director of Programming and Student Activities 

Allison Holcomb 

Acadenuc Assistants E)anielle Anger, Chailes Hesslo* 

FuU-Time Faculty 

University Rvfessor Emeritus RE. Sinner 

University PN>fessor H.K. Baker 

Professor Emeritus/a C.I. BartfeU, D.R. Brennei; 

T.V. DiBacco, R.B. Edehnan, R. Estes,H. Qazer, 

LL. KaradM, PC. Kumar, A. LaSalle, J. Owens. WK Petas, 

M. Seldin, JH. Sood 

Professor JD. Benjamin, P. Chinloy, W.H DeLone, 

GT. Fold, SJ^. Hohnberg, D.M. Khaniwta, DC. Martin, 

MB. Mazis.T. Mroc2towski, MP. San^sm, E.A Wasil, 

D.T. Williamson 

Associate Professor Emeritus OF. Bulmadi, J.R Binns, 

J.R Butts, SH. Ivison, Jr., J. Kokus, Jr. A. C. Peny, 

RM. Springer, Jr 

Associate Professor A. Adhikari, R.C. Anderson, B.J. Bird, 

E. Cannel, &R Oiidanier, F.L. DuBois, A Dum, H. Ehns, 

KA. Getz, R Gibson, C. Goldbeig, S. A. Grier, M Hastak, 

P.J. Jacoby, R Khorram^ahgol, RL. Losey, M.A Mass, 

A. Mitia, L£. Riddick, M.A Robe, V. Selman, JL. Swasy, 

KB. Ttompson, R J. \blkema 



Assistant Professor J Allee, MA. Claik, C. Caglio, 

A. Espinosa, S. W. Fowier, R HauswakL, G Lee, 

R.G Linowes, W. Liu, S. Marcum, N. Melander, J. Oetzel, 

A. Philipov, D. Post, R. M. Roman, M. S. \\Wdman, 

I. Yaveroglu, Y Zhang 

Professor in Residence V. Kvint 

Executive in Readence J A. Klein, P. Lewis, B.L. Nelson, 

R Sicina 

Vision, Mission and Objectives 

The Kogod School of Business strives Id achieve excellence 
in all that we do by adhering to the principles and practices ftat 
build \wrld-class companies In this sense, we practice what we 
teach. Central to our vision is a commitment to seek continuous 
improvement outcomes, to maintain ttie highest degree of integ- 
rity, to involve all stakeholders — feculty, students, staS^ alunmi, 
ani practitioners — and to enhance Kogod School's ovendl 
achievements and recogniticn. 

The Kogod School of Business provides educational experi- 
ences for our students; conducts scholarship for academic and 
professional audiences; and renda^ services for academic, pro- 
fessional, and business communities. 

In our teaching, we focus on the private sector and provide 
on students with; 

• a foundation within and across die functional areas of 
business and proficiency in areas of concentration; 

. knovsledge of and insight into abusiness environment that is 
increasingly dominated by global and technological issues 
and conq:Jex interrelationships among ether organizatioDs, 
industries, govanments, and their ^obalenvironmaits; and 

• preparation to beresponsiblecitizensofthewoildandassume 
leadership roles in a global buaness community. 

In our intellectual contributions and service, we seek to: 

• contribute to improved understanding of business issues 
relevant to academic, professional, and business audiences; 
and 

• engage those businesses and organi2Btions that will hire our 
students, support our educational efforts, and consume the 
resefvch created by our faculty 



Kogod School of Business 177 



Because of the chaiging nature of educational needs in 
managensnt, we mist remain entreprerBurial, relevant to our 
maikets, and flexible in our strategies. CXir mission and current 
strategy leverage American Ltaiversity's coramitment to glob- 
alization and our location in Washington, DC, a >M)rld capital 
and a mqor technology-rich business community. 

For more infonnation: www.la3godamerican.edu 

Accreditation 

The Kogod School of Business is accredited by AACSB In- 
ternational, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of 
Buaness. 
Departments and Special Centers 

The school is made up of six departments: Accounting, 
Finance and Real E<state, Intonational Business, Information 
Tedmology, Managemait, and Marketing. The Accounting 
Department owrsees Ae instruction of aD courses pertaining to 
accounting, taxation, and business law. The Department of 
Finance and Real Estate provides courses in finance, financial 
institutions, managerial economics, and real estate. The 
Department of International Business offers a variety of 
intematioDal courses that covo- all of the business disciplines, 
including maiketing, human resources management, finance, 
accounting, and trade. 

The Department of Information Technology provides in- 
struction in information technology, widi paiticular emphasis 
on fee global dimensions of technology, as well as produc- 
tion^operations management, statistics, strategies for informa- 
tion techiology development and use, and management of 
infcnnation technotagy resources. 

The Management Department provides instmction in the ar- 
eas of human resources, organizational behavior, entrepreneur- 
ship, strategy, business and corporate ethics, and global 
business citizenship. The Department of Marketing teaches 
courses in consumer behavior,research, advertising and promo- 
tion, maiketing strategy development, and technology based 
maiketing. 

The Center for Marketing Balicy Research sponsors re- 
search and disseminates infoimatiaii on the effects of govern- 
ment policy on the marketing of goods and services. 

The Center for Information Technology and the Global 
Economy is a leads' in the area of business issues at the inter- 
section of information tedmology and globalization This is ac- 
corr|)lishEd by supporting scholarly research and dialogue wifti 
the practitioner conmunity. 
Honorary Societies 

The school recognizes both academic and professional 
achievement by students and aluitni fiirough menijerdiip in 
national honorary societies. 

Beta Gaimia Sgma, founded in 1913, is fee honor society 
for scholars in fee field o fbusiness and rtanagement Itis linked 
with AACSB International and ment>ers elected to fee society 
attain fee highest national honor for students in business or 
management. 



Thcl^ambda Nu Chapterof A^iha Kappa Psi iTatetnity was 
installed in Kogod in 1982. The oiganivation is a professional 
buskiess fiHtemity dedicated to fee principles of professional 
development, efeical standards, and service in the conduct of 

business. 

Student Qubs 

There are numerous student clubs and associations in fee 
Kogod School of Business feat support students' academic 
progranB. 

Undergraduate 

The Undergraduate Business Association (UBA) serves as a 
complenBnt to fee Kogod educational experience by providing 
students fee opportunity to network, to develop leadership 
skills, to experience field trips, to be exposed to a wide array of 
guest speakers, and to compete in the case competition. 

The 1955 Club serves as a foundation for Kogod's 
co-curricular programs by providiiig students wife meaningfiil 
opportittiities to develop leadership skiUs The organization em- 
phasizes personal responsibility, integrity, and professional de- 
velopment. The 1955 Club has two groups: Kogod Bivoys 
serw as program aicbassadors, and Peer Mentors provide siqv 
port to first year student programming. 

The Washingtrai Initiative is a service learning program feat 
provides Ko god undergraduates wife volunteer opportunities to 
work on substantial business projects at local non-profits and 
charitable ageircies vi^e earning academic credit. The program 
challenges students to examine feeir beliefs and values ahoii 
business, ethics, and civic responsibihty by jpplying business 
practices to fee comrrunity's needs. 

The Road Scholars program exposes undei^graduate stu- 
dents to fee study of business and industry throu^ org^izied 
study and travel to destimtions worldwide. Throu^ site visits, 
networking events, and workshops, students e^qperience diverse 
industries frrsfeand. 

Founded in 1 904, Alpha Kappa Pa is a co-ed professional 
business fiBtemity. Based on a solid foundation of education 
and social programs, presentations, comminity service, and ex- 
tenave group work, merrbers develop and utilize ddlls essen- 
tial not only in today's business world, but also in everyday life. 

The American Marketing Association is fee student chapter 
of the world's leading society of marketing pirofessionals. Its 
purpose is to promote educatnn, assist in career development, 
and advatice the science and efeical practice of marketirrg. 

The Kogod Finance Group nsnages a sucoessfiil invest- 
ment portfolio and focuses on career developriBnt in fee invest- 
ment, banking and finaivial services industries. 

The Undagraduate Accounting Chrb (UAC) provides pro- 
gramiiing, networking, and siqjport for students interested in 
pursuing accounting. The UAC also assists students wife re- 
sources and inibrmation about CPA requirements and graduate 
school. 



1 78 Kogod School of Business 



Graduate 

The Graduate Business Association (CffiA) provides gradu- 
ate students a unified voice, encourages participation in deci- 
sion making, promotes academic excellence, facilitates 
professional skills development, promotes comnimity service, 
and enhances the quality of academic and social Ufe. 

The Asian MBA Association is a professional cub with a vi- 
sion to provide service, representation, and advocacy for Asian 
MBA students at flie Kogod School of Business. This chib holds 
networking events, speakers and fimdraisers to finther its mis- 
sion. 

The Black MBA Association is a ch^er of the National 
Black MBA Association and is dedicated to CTeating profltable 
partnerdiips fliat create and enhaiKe intellectual and economic 
wealth in the Black commmity. The organization gains its 
strength from a strong beUef in community and a commitment 
to its development through economic and educational develop- 
ment initiatives that support the global African- American com- 
mmity. 

The Corporate Partnerdiip Committee (CPC) aims to help 
students find companies of interest to students. The CPC acts as 
a liaison between the student body and Office of Graduate Ca- 
reer Services to help ensure that Graduate Career Services tar- 
gets student needs and actively recruits corporate 
representatives for Kogod events. 

Hispanic MBA promotes Hi^>anjc students within the busi- 
ness ccmmunity and seeks to foster Hispanic leadershp wittiin 
the Kogod community through professional devekpment activ- 
ities. Qub members participate in conferences, networking 
events and fimdraising. 

The International Business Student Associ^ion (IBSA) 
Mngs together sdiolars and pro fessionals to exchange tnforma- 
ticD and ideas in a multinational and muhicultural environtnait. 
The association provides leaderdiip inflie aieas of intanaticnal 
business and economic research and practice. It sponsors fo- 
rums, encourages research collaboration, and si^jports educa- 
tional activities of the highest professional quality. 

The JD/MBA Chib is a professional student organizition 
that works to address the paiticularrigois that JD/MBAstudarts 
encounter by providing a si^jport network open to all JD and 
MBA students interested or pursuing the joint degree. 

The Kogod Consulting Groiqj is a student fed organization 
within the Kogod School of Business whose mission is to pro- 
vide strategic solutions for corporations, nonprofit organiza- 
tions and govenment institutions 

The Kogod Entrepreneurs Club is committed to the promo- 
tion and practice of entrepreneurdiip. The chib qxmsois speak- 
ers, forums, and training on presentation and media skills. 



The Kogod Finance Group seeks to provide £in opportunity 
fcr all students at American University to gain out-of-class ex- 
perience in ttie finance industry by &ciUtating interaction be- 
tween faculty, alurmii, students, and professionals in the 
industry. KFG adiieves this mission ttirou^ active portfoUo 
management, workshops, hosting guest speakers, holding so- 
cial ga&erings, and paiticipation in investment competitions. 

The Kogod Women in Business (KWTB) chapter is a mem- 
ba- of ttie National Association of Women MBAs and seeks to 
promote the education and advancement of women in business 
by providing support through netwjiking and mentoring oppor- 
tunities, developing resources and abilities to be successful, and 
raising awareness through ocmmunity outreach. 

The Marketing Club brings together those individuals who 
share an into^st fcr the different aspects of marketing with the 
goal of increasing working knowledge by inteichaaging expwi- 
ences. The dub holds panels and netvroridng opportunities for 
members. 

MoGITClub{ManagemBnt of Global Information Technol- 
ogy) is a student orgeinization designed to augmmt leader^p 
and education in information technology. It provides a valuable 
\irk to the business conmunity, providing exposure and career 
opportunities in the information technology field. 

Net Impact is a network of more than 11,000 
new-gaieration leaders conxnitted to using the power of busi- 
ness to improve the worid. Kogod Net Impact members attend 
conferences, plan community savice projects, support local 
pUlanttiropic events and hdd panels on corporate social re- 
sponsibiUty. 

The Real Estate Club provides graduate students a platform 
to educate and be involved with different a^iects of the real es- 
tate industry through site visits, panel discussions, real estate 
software program training and networidng. 
Study Abroad Programs 

In the spring and fall semesters, undergraduate students 
have the opportunity to attaid the Euro American Institute of 
Technology (EAI Tech) located in Sophia Antipolis on the 
French Riviera. Classes at EAI Tech are taught in En^h and 
include a wide variety of business core and qjper-diviaon 
courses Students also have ftte opportunity to study French and 
do internships at hi^-tedi international conpanies. AU 
Abroad offers a range of options for study abroad in business at 
several AACSB and Equis accredited international business 
schools including The Chinese Uiiversity of Hong Kong, Lbi- 
versity College Dublin (Ireland), University of Queensland 
(Austraha), Adolfo Ibanez University (Chile), Universiteit 
Maastricht (Netherlands), and Tec de Monterrey (Mexico). 



Kogod School of Business 179 



Undergraduate Programs 



The business admimstratiDnpiDgiamhasa hberal arts-based 
curriculum with a Kisiness core that provides a broad knowl- 
edge of business tunctions while emphasi/ing the global busi- 
ness enviRinment. In addition to the business core, majois must 
complete an approved area of specialization. The objectives of 
the B.S.BA. program are; 
. develop students' intellectual curiosity and tiie abihty to think 

creatively, reason logically and respect diverse ideas and 

people; 

• a global perspective on business operations and economics^ 

• An understanding of ho w goods and services are produced 
and marketed; 

• a foundation in the concepts and applications of accounting 
financial analysis, and business finance; 

• An understanding of basic management theory and 
arganizational dynamics of the conterrporary business 
oiterfHise, 

• an appreciation of the legal, ethical, and societal dimensions 
of business decision-making; and, 

• an ability to integrate learning across academic disciplines 
and to develop strategic dedsion-maldng skills. 

In addition, each student is expected to: 

• demonstrate professional competence in oral, written, and 
interpersonal conxnunication skills in business setting 

• to understand how to use techndogy and analytical tools to 
improve efficiency, productivity, problem solving, and 
communication, and, 

• tounderstandtfaenatureofgroupdynbmicsandhowteamsof 
diverse individuals work together to analyze and solve 
business problems. 

Several features of flie piogramare irrqxrtantto these goals 
and distinguish it, including: 

• an emphasis on the developmoit of an individual career 
saiategy and the development of {Hxjfessional skill sets; 

• an integrated set of courses and co-curricular activities that 
develop managerial decision making dulls; 

• extensive opportunities for study abroad, internships 
(domestic and international), and interaction with 
iiiemational and national ^encies that affect domestic and 
irtemational business practices; and, 

• a learning environmait composed of skilled faculty and 
students fkim all over the world. 

Student Status 

The Kogod School of Business has two uadergraduate clas- 
sifications: lower-division (corresponding to ftie fie^mxin and 
sophomore years), and upper-divisicai (corresponding to the ju- 
nior and senior years). In the lower-division, students conplete 
university requirements in college writing and mathematics, the 
General Education program, and non-business prerequisites 
(economics, calculus, and statistics)and complete the following 



core courses: ACCT-240, ACCT-241, ITEC-200, 
MCiMT-100, and MGMT-2()1. 

In ttie upper-division, students complete the remainder of 
the business core as well as course work in an area of specializa- 
tioiL Upper-division standing is defined as 54 credit houis 
earned and is required for registration in most 300- and 
400-level courees. 

Internship Program 

Qualified business majors are encouraged to partidpate in 
the Internship Program, wiiich provides field experience in jobs 
related to their academic programs and career goals. The pro- 
gram enables students to make career decisions and prepare for 
the professional job madcet while earning degree credit Posi- 
tions may be with busiiBSses, local, state, or fedaal govem- 
ments or community, social service, or not-for-profit 
oiiganizations. To earn academic credit, undergraduate students 
must ha\« completed 12 credit hours in business includiig the 
300-level core course in the relevant Kogod department. The 
credit earned in an internship course can be used only for a free 
business elective course, and cannot replace a core or area of 
spedalization course. 

Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration (B.S.B.A.) 

Admission to the Rtigram 

Fredmxin applicants should have danonstrated above aver- 
age performance in tfaeirco liege preparatory courses in second- 
ary school. Scores on the SAT or ACT ^ould indicate that the 
applicant has flie potential for success in a rigorous university 
degree program Due to the quantitative emphasis of the busi- 
ness adninistiation curriculum, it is strongly recomn»nded that 
applicant take the SAT II Math test for placement purposes. 

In addition to university requrements for transfer admis- 
sion, transfer appUcants to KSB should have a minimum grade 
point average of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale). This also applies to stu- 
dents traiKferring fiom nondegree status at American IMver- 
sity. All B.S.B.A. transfer students are required to take 
MCMT-458 and at least 18 upper-level credit hours toward 
their major requirements in residence. Transfer owiits fcr up- 
per-division business couses are subject to vaHdatioo by 4e apy- 
propriate department chair and may be conditional on 
successful completion of a more advanced course at Arrericaa 
University. 

University Requirements 

• Atotal of 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or ftie equivalent by 
examination 



1 80 Kogod School of Bviainess 



General Education Requirements 

• A total o f ten courses, consisting of one foindation course and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence fiom each 
of fl>e five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 ciedit hours may be taken in flie same 
discq>line 

Curricular Area 4 should be fulfilled by ECON-IOOO 
Macroeconomics and ECON-200G Microeconomics. 
Major Requiremen ts 

• A total of 120 credit hours with a cumulative grade pdnt 
average of 2.00 or higher 

• Non-business prerequisite and required courses: 60 credit hours 
Accreditation standards for business programs recpiire that 
students oorr^lete 50 percent of flieir total couise woric 
outside the Kogod School of Business. 
roUS-200/lBUS-200G and FIN-200/FIN-200G are 
considered business courses and may not count toward the 
non-business course requirement even if they are taken for 
Genaal Education credit. 

Students may take more than 60 credit houis of business 
couises as long as 50 percent of their total credit hours is 
non-business course work 

• Business core courses: 33 credit hours with grades of C or 
betta- (pass/fan grades are not permitted) 

• After completing 24 credit hours in business course work, 
B.SB.A. students niist maintain a minimum cuniilative 
grade point average of 20 to be eligible to ouoll in KSB 
couises 

• Area of qjecializaticn: a minimum of 12 credit hours with 
grades of C or better (pass/fail grades are not permitted) 
Students ^ould declare an area of ^ciaUzation before the 
end of thar jxmior year. All areas of speciali2ation must be 
approved in advance by the Undergraduate Programs Office. 
Students must meet the following minimum standards of 
performance prior to approval: 

minimum grade of C in MATH-211 Applied Calculus I and 

STAr-202 Basic Statistics 

minimum grade of C in ECON-IOO/ECON-IOOG 

Macroeconomics and ECON-200/ECON-200G 

Microeconomics 

• Free electives; 1 5 ciedit hours 

• At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for 
the B.S.BA imst be earned at American University 

Course Requirements 

Students are responsible for fulfilling university and school 
requirements following a prescribed sequence. The academic 
coimsetors in the Kogod School's Ltodergraduate Programs 
Office or faculty advisors must be consulted for oounsding and 
advice when preparing class schedules. Howevo; it is the stu- 
dent's responsibility to consult course descrq)tions to identify 
couise prerequisites and when courses are ofiered. 



Non-Business Requirements 

• ECON-100/EOON-100GMaaDeconomics4:l(3) 

• ECON-200/ECON-200G Microeconomics 4:2(3) 

• MArH-211 Applied Calculus I (4) 

or 
MArH-221 Calculus I (4) (for students with a stronger 

background in mathematics) 
Students needing to strenglhentheir quantitative skills should 
begin withMATH-lSV Finite Mathematics: Business. 

• STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• 6 ciedit hours in foreign language or approved intonaticnal 
or cross-cultural courses from flie following: 

Couises fiom flie School of International Service (SIS) 
Couises fiom ttie Department of Language and Foreign 

Studies, College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) 
Curricular Area 3 (Global and Multicultural Perspectives) 
couises may be used to meet this requirement, but the 6 credit 
houis must be in addition to those taken to fulfill the General 
Education Requirement 

AU Abroad courses (if not used to fulfill another 
requirement), international internships, or o&er approved 
study abroad programs 

Business Core Courses (33 credit hours)) 

• ACCr-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• ACCr-241 Principles of Managerial Accounting (AF) (3) 

• FIN-365 Business Finance (AT) (3) 

• IBUS-300FundameiJalsofInten]atiooal Business (CVW) (3) 

• ITEC-200 The Edge of hiformation Technology (AT) (3) 

• llbC-355 Production/Operations Management (AT/C) (3) 

• MGMT-100 Business 1 .0 (3) 

(students not taking MGMT- 1 00 in ttieir fieshnun >ear take 
a 300- or 400-level course in its place) 

• MGMr-201 Gtobal Corporate Citizenship (O) (3) 

• MGMr-353 Principles of Organizational Theory, 

Behavior and Management (W) (3) 

• MGMT-458 Business PoKcy and Strategy (W/O/T) (3) 

• MKTG-300 Principbs ofMaiteting Q^') (3) 

AT =analyticaltool emphasis; provides a strong foundation in 

business analytical software 

C = case analysis enphasis; jrovides growQi opportunities 

for students to evaluate cases 

O =oral communication enphasis; assists in the development 

of oral presentation ddlls 

T = teamwoik errphasis; focuses on teamwtnk and the 

inqxirtanoB of interpersonal relstion^p and conxnunicaticni 

W = written oommmication emphasis; develops business 

writing skills, written assignmaits account for a significant 

part of the couise grade 



Kogod School of Business 181 



Area of Specialization 

Business tnajars select a specialization fitnn tiie appioved 
specializalions listed below ordesign a custom or interdisciplin- 
ary specialization with the approval of their Kogod advisor. 
Specializations muSi include a nrnmnuin of 12 credit hours et 
the 300 level or above. Students who choose a second area of 
specialization must also take a mirrimum of 12 credit hours in 
the second specialization 

Accounting (12 credit hours) 

• ACCT-340 hitermediate Accourting I (3) 

• ACCT-341 hitermediate Accounting II (3) 

• ACCT-345 Cost Accounting and Strategic Cost 

Management (3) 

• ACCT-443 Federal Income Taxation of Individuals and 

Businesses (3) 
Finance (12 credit hours) 

• 12 credit hours fiom the following: 

FIN -464 Financial Markets and Institutions (3) 
FIN -465 Daivative Securities (3) 
FIN -468 Intermediate Corporate Finance (3) 
FlN-469 Investment Analyas (3) 
FIN-474 Real Estate Finance and Econoinics (3) 
IBUS-302 htemational Fiiance (3) 
Information Systems and Technology (12 credit hours) 

• rrEC-455 Requirements Analysis (3) 

• ITEC-470 Databases, Data Mining, and Knowledge 

ManagemEst (3) 

• 6 credit hoirs fbmi the following 
nEC-333 Topics in Information Technology (3) 
rrEC-334 Computer Ftograraning in the Web Era (3) 
llbC-350 Introduction to Management Information 

Systems (3) 
Into-national Business (12 credit hours) 

• IBUS-301 Intemational Marketing (3) 

• IBUS-302 Intemational Finance (3) 

• IBUS-402 htemational Human Resources Management (3) 

• IBUS-404 htemational Accounting and FiiBncial 

Consulting (3) 
International Finance (12 credit hours) 

• FIN-464 Financial Markets and Institutions (3) 

• FIN -468 Intermediate Corporate Finance (3) 

• IBUS-302 htemational Fiiance (3) 

• IBUS-404 htemational Accounting and FiiBncial 

Consulting (3) 
International Management (12 credit hours) 

• IBUS-401 Cultural Environment of Intemational 

Business (3) 

• IBUS-402 Intemslional Human Resouioe Management (3) 

• nEC-454 Fundamentals ofElectronic Cortmeroe (3) 



• MGMT-386EntrepreneuTship (3) 

International Marketing (12 credit hours) 

• IBUS-301 Intemational Malceting (3) 

• IBUS-408 Export/hnport ManagemeU (3) 

• MKTG-301 Consumer Behavior (W) (3) 

• MKTO-302Maiketing Research (C)(3) 

Management (12 credit hours) 

• MGMT-381ManagingHuman Capital (3) 

• \KjMT-409 Leading High Performance Teams (3) 

• 6 credit hoirs from ttie following 
MGMT-386Entiepre«urship (3) 
MGMT-423 MaiBguig Change and Innovation (3) 
MGMT-465 Negotiation (3) 

MjMT-484 Consulting and Project Managemeit (3) 
Marketii^ (12 credt hours) 

• MKTG-301 ConsuBH-BelBvior (3) 

• MKTG-302Maiketing Research (3) 

• 6 credit hours from ttie following 
IBUS-301 htemational Maketing (3) 
MKTG-311 hitemet Maik^ing (3) 
MKTG-402 Marketing Strategy (3) 

MKTG-41 1 Advertising and Marketing Ccmmunications 

Management (3) 
MKTG-41 2 Advertising and Promotion Campaigns (3) 
MKTG-431 Direct Response Maketing (3) 
Real Estate (12 credit hours) 

• 6 credit hours from fee following 

FIN-373 Real Estate ftincipies and Transactions (3) 

FIN-474 Real Estate Finance and Economics (3) 

FIN -475 Real Estate Management and Development (3) 

• 6 credit hours from fee following 

FIN-464 Financial Markets and histitutions (3) 

FIN -465 Derivative Securities (3) 

FIN -469 Investment Analysis (3) 
University Honors Program 

Students in fee University Honors Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with Ltaiversity Honws in fee major. To do 
so, studeits complete 1 2 hours of advanced-level Honors woik 
in the school and, upon school reccxntiKndation, graduate wife 
University Honors h the major The school 's Ffonors coordina- 
tor advises students in the IMversity Honors Program legaid- 
ing school options. 

Washington Semester in 

Intemational Business and l^ade 

This pro gram draws on the unique environment of Ufehing- 
ton, D.C., focusing on the interplay between national govem- 
ment institutions and the business sectw. Students study the 
impact of government policies and actions on iitemational 
busiiess and trade ferou^ seminars with decision makos and 



1 82 Kogod School of Business 



business leaders, intemships with organizations in WaAington, 
and research Students earn undg-graduate oedits that may be 
applied toward a bachelor's degree. 
Admission to the Program 

The program is open to non-business students at American 
University and to students of affiliated institutions from across 
the country. Requirements for adnrdsaon to the program are: 
nomination by a faculty representative of the Washington Se- 
mester Program; a minimum grade point average of 2.50 (on a 
4.00 scale); and at least second-semester sophomore standing. 
Course Requirements 

• IBUS-420 International Business and Trade Seminar I (4) 

• IBUS-421 IntematioiBl Business and Trade Seminar 11 (4) 

• IBUS-422 International Business and Trade Research 

Project (4) 
or 
an elective course may be substituted for the researchproject 

• IBUS-423 International Bustoess and Trade Internship (4) 

Minor in Business Administration 

The minor is designed to provide coverage of the common 
body of knowledge in business administration for non-business 
riBJors. 
Mine r Requiremen ts 

• 1 8 credit hours with grades of C or better, a rtinitnim of 9 
credit hours at the 300-level or above, and at bast 12 credit 
houis unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ACCr-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• FIN-365 Business Finance (3) (prerequisite; ACCT-240, 
ECON-200 Microeconomics and STAT-202 Basic 
Statistics) 

• MGMT-353 Principles of Organizational Theory, 

Behavior and Management (3) 

• MKTCj-250 Fundamentals of Marketing and Business fir 

Comrainications (3) 
or 

MK'TCj-300 Principles ofMaiteting (3) (prerequisite: 
ECON-200 Mkaoeoonomics) 

• 6 credit hours from ttie fcilowing: 

ACCr-241 Princq)les of Managerial Accounting (3) 
IBUS-300 Fundamentals of International Business (3) 
HbC-355 Production/Operations Management (3) 
(prerequisite: ACCT-24 1 , ECavI-200 
Micioeconomics, MATH-21 1 Applied Calculus I or 
MArH-221 Calculus I, and STAT-202 Basic Statistics) 
MOMT-201 Gbbal Corporate Citizenship (3) 

Minor in Finance 

The minor in finance provides non-buaness majors with an 
understanding of key finance concepts. Through case studies 



and company projects, students leam how to apply these 
concepte to real-life situations. Students also gain insist on fi- 
naacial maikets and their wide-ranging in^xicts. 

Minor Requirements 

• 19-22credithours withgradesofCcH-better,amininiimof9 
credit hours at the 300-level or above, and at feast 12 credit 
houis unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• ECON-IOO/ECON-IOOG Macroeconomics 4: 1 (3) and 
ECON-200/ECON-200G Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

or 

an economics course covraing the fimdamentals of business 
economics (3) 

• FIN-365 Business Finance (3) 

• STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

FIN -464 Financial Mark^ and Institutions (3) 
FIN -465 Derivative Securities (3) 
FIN-469 Investment Analysis (3) 
IBUS-302 hitemational Finance (3) 

Minor in Information Systems and 
Technology 

• IScredithourswithgradesofCorbetterandatleast 12credit 
houis unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• rrEC-200 The Edge of Information Technology (3) 

• llEC-333 Topics in Infonnation Tecimokagy (3) 

• nEC-334 Corrpiter Ptogjamming in the Web Era (3) 

• ilbC-350 Introductkm to Management Information 

Systems (3) 

• ITEC-455 Requirements Analysis (3) 

• rTEC-4 70 Datffcases, Data Mining, and Knowledgp 

Management (3) 

Minor in Marketing 

The minor in maiketing provides non-business majors with 
a fliou^ understanding of die fundamental concepts of maiket- 
ing and how to apply these coneys ttirou^ case studies and 
company and non-profit oiganiation projects. Students also 
gain an understanding of consumer behavior, along with the 
knowledge and tools needed to coordinate marketing elements 
into integrated campaigns. 

Minor Requirements 

• 18 oedit hours with grades of C or bett», a tiininvm of 9 
credit hours at the 300-level or above, and at feast 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 



Kogod School of Business 183 



Coirse Requirements 

• MKTO-250 Fundamentals ofMarketing and Business for 

Commmications (3) 

• 15 credit hours fiom the following: 
MKTG-301 Consuim- Behavior (3) 
MKTG-302 Marketing Research (3) 
MKTG-311 hitemet Marketing (3) 
MKTG-391 Internship in Marketing (3) 

MKTG-41 1 Advertising and Maiketing Communioations 

Management (3) 
MKTG-41 2 Advertising and Promotion Campaigns (3) 
MKTG-431 Direct Response Marketing (3) 

Minor in Real Estate 

The real estate minor is designed to provide non-business 
majors with a ftiough understanding of real estate principles and 
enable them to apply them to actual circumstances using case 
studies and coirqjany projects, as well as to understand real es- 
tate markets and the fectors influencing ttieir behavior. 



Minor Requirements 

• 18 credit hours with grades of C or better, a minimum of 9 
credit hours at the 300-level or above, and at least 12 credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• ACCT-240 Principles of Financial Accounting (3) 

• BCON-100/ECON-100GMacroeconomics4;l (3) 

or 
BCON-200/ECON-200G Nficioeconanics 4:2 (3) 

• FIN-365 Business Finance (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following 

FIN-373 Real Estate Fttncipies and Transactions (3) 

FIN -474 Real Estate Finance and Ecoi»mics (3) 

FIN -475 Real Estate Management and DevBlopirent (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following: 

FIN -464 Financial Markets and Institutions (3) 
FIN -465 Derivative Securities (3) 
FIN -469 Investment Analysis (3) 



Graduate Programs 



Intemsiiip for Credit Prognun 

Graduate studaits may earn electiw credit for intemsfaips 
that are related to their academic program and flieir career goals. 
These positions are fuU or part time and are usually with busi- 
nesses, state or federal governments, or not-for-profit orginiza- 
tions. Students who elect to do an internship for credit will be 
assigned a faculty member who will guide and evaluate &e stu- 
dents' learning process. 

To be eligible fijr an internship for credit, students must be in 
good academic standing (at least a 3.0 CffA) and M.B A stu- 
dents must have completed 12 credit hours of the required core 
course work. Before students apply they must obtain appropri- 
ate signatures fiom their academic advisors (international stu- 
dents also need approval fiom International Student & Scholar 
ServicesX and provide a position description from the em- 
ployer. All intenishqjs aie reviewed and approved for credit by 
the faculty advisor Students are required to demonstrate what 
they have learned through written pqiers or reports. Specific re- 
quirements are set by tile faculty in tiie syllabus. Students doing 
an intem^p for credit rrust woric a minimum of 10 hours ps 
wedc for at least 12 wedcs. Students register after they are se- 
lected for a position by an emfioyer and have all the necessary 
forms completed. A maximum of 3 internship credit hours, 
takai as elective credit, may be ap{iied toward a student's de- 
gree program requirements. Students will be graded on a 
pass'fail basis. 



Master of Business Administration 
(M.B.A.) 

The goal of the M.B A program is to develop practical busi- 
ness managers with both the analytical ability and managerial 
skills to be able to succeed in the complex, technical arena of 
woiid-wide businesses today and in the fiiture. 

The M.B.A. program contains within its required currioi- 
lum the business perspectives and core areas required by 
AACSB. The MB.A is a broad, general management program 
with the opportunity for emphasis in two business fields. 

Admission to the R^gram 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, applicants must have earned a satisfectory 
score on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAI) 
anda satisfactory grade point average forthe last 60 hoursof ac- 
ademic work fixjm a Council on Fbstsecondary Accreditation 
(COPA) regionally-accredited institution 

Applicants whose first language is not EngUdi are also re- 
quired to take the IDEFL (Test of EngKsh as a Foreign Lan- 
guage) and demonstrate English language pnoficiency. 

Students are admitted to the M.B A. program starting in Au- 
gust or January. Full-time students generally take between 12 
and 1 5 credit hours per semester, which allows fbr completion 
of die d^ree in four semesteis. Within the limits of pra^qui- 
sites and course availability, part-time students may move 
through the program at their own pace. 



1 84 Kogod Sdiool of Business 



D^ree RequiremeDts 

• 51 credit hours of approved graduate course work including 
31.5 credit hours of required core and advanced breadth 
couises and 19.5 credit hours in one or two career trades and 
elective s. 

Up to 9 oredit hours of course wodc may be waived fiom 
ACCr-607, FIN-605, and ITEC-610 if students have taken 
equivalent course work at the mdergraduate level in the past 
seven years, received grades of B or better, and pass an 
exatninatbn during orientation for each course waived. Any 
courses waived by special exception beyond the 9 credits are 
waived wife replacement of an equal number of credits of 
other course work. 

Up to 9 credit hours earned at another AACSB-aocredited 
MBA program may be transferred and sqjphed to the Kogod 
MBA requirenents. 

A minimum of 30 credits taken in residence from fee Kogod 
School ofBusiness is required for fee MB.A. 
M.B.A. students may take a maxinum of 6 credit hours in 
500-level courses or graduate courses which meet 
concurrently wife undergraduate courses. 
Intensive writing requirement: 

• MGMr-624 Applied Strategic Management in a Global 

Envirornnenl (3) 

• One of the following 
ACCr-623 Business Law (3) 
ACCr-685 Topics in Accounting: 

Legal Issues for fee Global Manager (3) 
IBUS-618 Manager in the Intematicoal Economy (3) 
MGMT-622 Business, Efeics, and Society (3) 
MGMr-685 Topics in Management: 

Global Business Citizenship (3) 
All courses for this lequirement must be taken in residence at 
Kogod wife a grade of B or better. 

• Orientation requirement: All students are required to 
participate in the MB.A. Preparation Program prior to fee 
start of classes in their first semester. 

Course Requirements 
Core (18 credit hours) 

• ACCr-607 Accounting Concepts and Apphcations (3) 

• FIN-605 Managerial Ecor»mics (3) 

• FIN-614 Financial Management (3) 

• ITEC-610 Api^ed Managerial Statistics (3) 

• MGMT-609 Organizational Behavior and Human 

Resource Management (3) 

• MKTG-612 Marketing Managemett (3) 
Advanced ftvadth (195 credit hours) 

• IBUS-6 1 8 Manager in fee International Economy (3) 

• ITEC-61 2 AppiiedPhjduction and Operations 

MamgenKnt (1.5) 

• ITEC-e 16 Management hifomBtion Systems (3) 



• MGMT-624 Applied Strategic Management in a Global 

Environment (3) 

• One of the following 

MGMT-622 Busineas, Ethics, and Society (3) 
or 

MGMT-685 Topics in Management 
Global Business Citizensiiip (3) 
ACCr-623 Buaness Law (3) 
or 
ACCr-685 Topics in Accounting: 

Legal Issues for fee Global Manager (3) 
MBA Career IVacks and Electives (195 credit houn) 

• 9-1 2 credit hours in a career track 

• remaining credit hours in a second career track or electives 
A maximum of 3 credit hours may be taken in an intemsiiip 
for elective credit (see tntemslq) for credit program, above) 

Accounting (9 credit liours) 

The Accounting career track offers a breadfe of krjowledge 
in accounting and management. Students leam a wide array of 
tedmiques that contribute to careers in consulting, finance, and 
general management and xspaa completion of the program will 
possess fee basic conceptual knowledge of accounting as well 
as insists into the nature, limitations, interpretations, and ises 
of financial information and technolo gy necessary for corporate 
valuation atxl management. 

• 9 credit hours chosen in consultation wife the depettnent 
chair from fee following: 

ACCT-547 Advanced Financial Reporting (3) 
ACCr-549 Cottempoiary Assirance and Audit Services (3) 
ACCr-560 Govennmental and Not-for Profit Accounting (3) 
ACCT-604 Tax Planning for Individuals and Business 

Enterprises (3) 
ACCr-641 Corporate Firancial Reporting (3) 
ACCT-650 Accounting Information Systems (3) 
ACCr-670 International Accounting (3) 
ACCr-725 Modem Managemait CcMtrol Systems (3) 
ACCr-760 Advanced Auditing and Ftofessional Practice (3) 
ACCr-770 Current Topics in Accounting (1 .5) 
ACCT-780 Seminar in Accounting Theory (3) 
Graduate taxation courses: 
ACCr-630 Legislative and Judicial Foundations of 

Income Tax (3) 
ACCr-631 Tax Research and Procedure (3) 
ACCr-632 Estate and Gift Tax (3) 
ACCT-740 Taxation of Corporations (3) 
ACCr-741 Stale and Local Taxation (3) 
ACCr-742 Special Tax Topics (3) 
ACCr-743 Intanational Taxation (3) 
ACCr-745 Enployee Benefit Tax Planning (3) 
ACCT-746 Taxation of Real Estate Transactions (3) 
ACCT-747 Taxation of Pass-Throu^ Entities (3) 
ACCr-750 Tax Policy (3) 
ACCT-751 Serrinar in Business Tax Planning (3) 



Kogod School of Business 185 



ACCT-752 Seminar in Family Financial Plaaning (3) 
Asset Management (12 credit hours) 

In this track students learn to value a wide range of individ- 
ual assets and to form aid manage portfolios of these asseta 
Students with this training will be well equipped to work as an 
investment andyst or trader for an investmait house, rrutual 
fund, retirem«it fund, imuranoe company, or trading firm 

• FIN -672 InvestiTBnt Analysis and Portfolio 

Management (3) 

• FIN-674 Derivatives and Risk Management (3) 

• FIN-677 Financial Strtement Analysis (1.5) 

• FIN -685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate (1 .5) 

• 3 credit hoirs from one of ttie fdlowing: 
Real Eslale and/or Venture Capital 

ACCT-685 Topics in Accounting (1 .5) 

FIN-676 Financial Institutions (1.5) 

FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate (1 .5) 

FIN-730 Real Estate and Principles and Investmrot (3) 

FIN-734 Real Estate Developmmt (3) 

SrAT-522 Tme Series Analysis (3) 
Money Management 

ACCT-Ml Corporate Financial Reporting (3) 

ACCT-685 Topics in Accounting (1 .5) 

FIN-673 Coqxjrate Valuation and Financial Strategy (3) 

FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate (1.5) 

IBUS-700 Intemational Finance (3) 

SrAT-522 Tnne Series Analysis (3) 
ConsultiDg (12 credit hours) 

Provides studaits with some of the fundamental training, 
fiamewoiks, and techniques used by leading consulting firms 
and the opportunity to work with ptactidng consultants in the 
classroom Students specialize in one of three consulting areas: 
information tedmokgy, intemational business^, or manageiiient 
consulting. 
Information Technology 

• MGMT-626 Consulting Practice and Methodology (3) 

• rrEC-630 System Requirements and Design for 

Managers (3) 

• nEC-643 Consulting Project and the Enterprise Process (3) 

• 3 credit hours fitan the following 
nEC-640 aobal Connectivity (1.5) 

ITEC-641 GJobal Collaborative Technology and Virtual 

Teams(1.5) 
rrEC-652 Strategic Manag^nent of Global Information 

Systems (1.5) 
nEC-656 Topics in Management of Oobal Informatbn 

Technology (1.5) 
rrEC-658 Intemational Electronic Commerce (1.5) 
lTEC-666 Infonnation Security Technology and 

Management (1.5) 



Intern ationaJ Business 

• MGMT-626 Consulting Practice and Methodology (3) 

• IBUS-702 Strategic Managemeit of Multinational 
Corporations (1.5) 

• rrEC-643 Consulting Project and the Enterprise Process (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following 
IBUS-685 Topics in Intemational Business (1 .5) 
IBUS-705 Export/hnport Managemert (1.5) 
IBUS-740 Project Finance in Developing and Transitional 

Economies (1.5) 
IBUS-741 Intemational Technology Transfer (1.5) 
IBUS-742 Analysis of Intemational Business E^qjansion: A 

Consulting Expraience (1.5) 

Management 

• nEC-643 Consulting Project and the EnteijHTse Process (3) 

• MjMT-611 Change and Innovalion (3) 

• MGMT-626 Consulting Practice and Methodology (3) 

• 3 credit hours from the following 
MGMT-665 Negptiatkms (15-3) 

MGMT-666 Strategic Alliances and New Enterprises (1 .5) 
MGMT-685 Topics in Management (1.5-3) 

Corporate Finance: Investment Bankjng (12 credit 
hours) 

In this track students prep>arB for carets in the financial ser- 
vices industry, specifically within investment banking witti 
spedalzations in eiter corporate finance and private equity, or 
trading and sales. The broad range of courses allows students to 
acquire ttie requisite skills, quantitative expertise, and institu- 
tional knowledge to succeed in this conrpetitive work 
environment. 

• FIN-671 Advanced Financial Management (3) 

• FIN-673 Corporate Vahiation and Financial Strategy (3) 

• FIN -677 Financial Statement Analysis (1 .5) 

• 4.5 credit hours from one of the fdlowing: 

Corporate Finance and Private Equity 

FIN-672 Investment Analyas andPortiblio 

Management (3) 
FIN-674 Derivates and Risk ManageirKnt (3) 
FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate (1 .5) 

Trading and Selling 
ACCT-685 Topics in Accounting (1 .5 ) 
ECON-522 EcooHnelrics (3) 
FIN-672 InvestnBnt Analysis and PortfoUo 

Management (3) 
FIN-674 Derivttes and Ride Managonent (3) 
FIN-680 hiveslmait Banking (1.5) 
FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate (1 .5) 
IBUS-700 Intemational Finance (3) 



1 86 Kogod School of Business 



Corporate Finance: Commercial Banking (105 credit 
hours) 

Prepares students for a careCT path whidi leads to senior ex- 
ecutive positions in banking and senior executive positions in 
the corporate finance fimction of companiea 

• FIN-677 Financial Statement Analysis (1.5) 

• FIN 682-Managing Depository Instftutions (1.5) 

• IBUS-701hiteniational Banking (1.5) 

• 6 credit hours from ftie following: 
ACCT-670 Intonaticnal Accounting (3) 

FIN 673 Corporate Wuation and Financial Strategy (3) 
FIN-674 Derivatives and Risk Managemait (3) 
IBUS-700 International Finance (3) 
MGMT-665 Negotiations (3) 

Corporate Finance: Corporate Financial Management 

(12 credit hours) 

Prepares students for positions in this field in ttie finance 
function of entrepreneurial and mid- and large sized conpanies. 

• ACCT-725 Modem Management Control Systems (3) 

• FIN -671 Advanced Financial Management (3) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 
ACCT-670 International Accounting (3) 
FlN-672 hvesttnent Analysis and Portfolio 

Management (3) 
FIN-673 Corporate Valuation and Financial Strategy (3) 
FIN-674 Derivatives and Risk Management (3) 
IBUS-700 International Finance (3) 
IBUS-701 International Banking (1.5) 
Entrepreneursh^ (9 credit hours) 
PiDvides students with the opportunity to behave like an en- 
trefxeoeur in enployee and management roles and the tools for 
starting, managing and growing a business. Students learn how 
to woik with closely-held businesses and how to assess 
start-ups as potential vendots and investments. 

• MGMr-661 New Vaiture Creation (3) 

• MGMT-662 Managing Small and Growing 

Organizations (1.5) 
or 
MGMT-663 Managing a Family Business (1 .5) 

• 4.5 credit hours fimn the following: 
FIN-685 Topics in Finance and Real Estate (1 .5) 
MGMr-662 Managing Small and Growing 

Organizations (1 .5) 
or 

MGMr-663 Managing a Family Business (1.5) 
MGMT-665 Negotiations (3) 
MGMT-666 Sttategk: Alliances, Mergers and 

Acquisitions (1.5) 
MGMT-685 Topics in Management (1 .5-3) 
Global Emerging Markets (12 credit hours) 
This track is designed to give students the skills and tools to 
understand and do business in and with erasing maiket coun- 



tries and companies. Three sp)eciaIizations ^are a common 
core ofiequired courses and provide students wi& &e opportu- 
nity to pursue speciali2ed functional courses in finance or infor- 
mation technology: Doing Business in Global Emerging 
Maiket (for students \Mbio wish to devdop q^ecialized regional 
and country expertise and foreign language skills). Global 
Emerging Market and Information Technology (for students 
wto wish to be involved in outsourcing and electronic com- 
merce), and Global Emerging Maricet and Finance. 

Global Emerging Markets: Business 

• IBUS-746 Global Emerging Maiket (3) 

• IBUS-748 Management in Emerging Maikets (1.5) 

• 1.5 credit hours fixjm ttie following: 
IBUS-685 Topics in International Business(l .5) 
IBUS-741 International Techndogy Transfer (1.5) 
IBUS-742 Analysis of International Business Expansion: 

A Consulting Experience (1.5) 

• 6 credit hours from flie fdlowing: 

IBUS-744 International Dimensk)ns of Management Study 

Abroad Pnaject (3) 
SIS-539 Comparative Developnent Strategies (3) 
SIS-579 Selected Regional and Country Studies (3) (topics) 
Approved graduate foreign language course (3) 
Global Emerging Markets: Finance 

• IBUS-746 Global Emei^ing Maiket (3) 

• IBUS-748 Management in EraBiging Maikets (1 .5) 

• 1.5 credit hours fixmi flie following: 
IBUS-685 Topics in International Business (1 .5) 
IBUS-741 International Technology Transfer (1.5) 
IBUS-742 Analysis of IntemationalBusinessExpansfon: 

A Consulting Experience (1.5) 

• 6 credit hours fitnn ttie fdlowing: 
ACCr-670 Intematicmal Accounting (3) 
FTN-681 Financial Intermediatkm in Emerging 

Markets (1.5) 
IBUS-700 hitetnational Finance (3) 
IBUS-701 International Banking (1.5) 
IBUS-740 Project Finance in Developing and Transitional 

Economies (1.5) 
Global Emerging Markets: Information Technology 

• IBUS-746 Global Emerging Maiket (3) 

• IBUS-748 Management in Emerging Maikets (1.5) 

• 1.5 credit hours fi-om fee following: 
IBUS-685 Topics in International Business(l .5) 
IBUS-741 International Technology Transfer (1.5) 
IBUS-742 Analysis of International Business Expansion: 

A Consulting Experience (1 .5) 

• 6 credit hours from the following: 

rrEC-643 Consulting Project Managemait and the 
EnterjMTse Process (3) 



Kogod School of Business 1 87 



ITEC-654 Nations, Policy, and Information 

Technology (1.5) 
nEC-656 Topics in Management of Oobal Information 

Technology (1.5) 
ITEC-658 International Electronic Commerce (1.5) 
Into-nalionaHVade and Global Supply Chain 
Management (9 credit hours) 

Designed to provide students with ftie knowledge and skills 
required for the effective management of the global trade and 
supply chain operations of the multinalional enterprise. Stu- 
dents obtain knowledge of si^jply chain management, purchas- 
ing and logistics operations, market entry strategies, 
export -import management, technology transfer and other rele- 
vant international business areas. 

• IBUS-703 Global Maiket Entry Strategies (3) 

• IBUS-705 Export-Import Management (1.5) 

• IBUS-745 Global Supply Chain Management (3) 

• 1.5 credit hours from 4ie following: 
IBUS-701 International Baridng (1.5) 
IBUS-741 Intemational Technology Transfer (1 .5) 
IBUS-742 Analysis of Intemational Business Expansbn; 

AConsulting Experience (1.5) 
IBUS-743 Intemational Advertiang and Branding 

Strategy (1.5) 
rrEC-656 Topics in Management of Global Informatbn 

Technology (1.5) 
Marketing Management (9 credit hours) 

This track offa^ students the opportunity to apply key mar- 
keting concepts to "real life" situations by case studies and fjro- 
jectsfor (TO fit and non-profit organizatians. Itf^epares students 
for a variety of marketing management fields, including adver- 
tising, sales promotion, media planning, account management, 
intanet rraiketing, and brand management. Students gain a 
thorough understanding of key maiketing concepts sudi as tar- 
get maiket selection, positioning, new product/service develop- 
meit, distribution strategies, pricing strategies, and px)motional 
strategies 

• MKTG-765 Braal Strategy (3) 

• MKTG-764 Survey Methods in Maiketing Research (1 .5) 

or 

MKTG-766 Qualitative Mettiods in Marketing 
Reseaich (1.5) 

• 4.5 credit hours fiiom ttie following; 
MKTO-750 Internet Maik^ing Management (1 .5) 
MKTG-754 Database Marketing (1.5) 
MKTG-755 Geodemographic Market Analysis (1.5) 
MKTG-761 Buyer Behavior (1.5) 

MKTG-762 Integrated Maiketing CommunicatiQn (3) 
MKTG-764 Survey Methods in Marketing Research (1 .5) 
or 

MKTG-766 Qualitative M^ods in Marketing 
Reseaich (1.5) 



Marketing Research (9 credit hours) 

I Xi signed to prepare students for caieers in the marketing re- 
search field, either with maiketing research suppliers cr with 
companies that use research to improve marketing decision 
making. Students leam the psychological foundations ofbuyo- 
behavior, the princiides of designing survey questionnaires, the 
fiindamcitols of analyzing survey data, and the ap|it>priate use 
of statistical techniques and oompiier software to analyze re- 
search data. 

• MKTO-761 Buyer Behavior (1.5) 

• MKTG-764 Suney Methods in Marketing Research (1.5) 

• 3 credit hours fiom the following 
MKTG-754 Database Marketing (1.5) 
MKTG-755 Geodemographic Market Analysis (1 .5) 
MKTG-766 Qualitative Methods in Marketing 

Reseaich (1.5) 

• 3 credit hours 6am flie following 

SrAT-515 Regression (3) (prerequisite: STAr-514 or 

equivalent) 
SrAT-51 6 Design of Experiments (3) (prerequisite: 

STAr-514 or equivalent) 
SrAT-520 Applied Multivariate Analysis (3) (jHwequisite: 

STAT-Sl 4 or equivalent) 
SrAT-521 Analysis of Frequency Data (3) (prerequisite: 

SrrAT-51 4 or equivalent) 

Real Estate (9 credit hours) 

This career track offirs courses including real estate princi- 
ples, residential and commercial real estate mortgage markets, 
and real estate developnent. KSB maintains and actively pro- 
motes strong contacts with local professional associations in- 
cluding ttie Washington, DC. Association of Realtors, the 
Appraisal Institute and the seoondarj' mortgage market. 

• 9 credit hours fiom the following 

ACCT-746 Taxation of Real Estate Transactions (3) 
FIN-671 Advanced Finandal Management (3) 
FIN -676 Financial Institutions (1.5) 
FIN-730 Real Estate and Principles and Investment (3) 
FIN-732 Residential Real Estate and Mortgage 

Maries (1.5) 
FIN-733 Commercial Real Estate and Mortgage 

Maricets (3) 
FIN-734 Real Estate Development (3) 

"Disation (12 credit hours) 

Provides studaits with the drills required to woric in the tax 
departmeats of public accounting finns and large corporations. 

• ACCT 630 Legislative and Judicial Foundations in 

Taxation (3) 

• ACCT631 Tax Reseaich and Procedae (3) 

• ACCT 740 Corporate hicome Taxation (3) 

• ACCT 747 Taxation ofPass-Through Entities (3) 



188 Kogpd School of Business 



Career Advancement IVack in Leadership (9 credit 
hours) 

Intended for students who are pursuing an MBA for pm^ 
poses of career advancement (promotion to leadeisbip positions 
wittiin Ifaeir current functional areas) rather than career change 
(moving into business careers, or switching fiinctional areas). 

• MOMT 61 1 Change and Innovation (3 ) 

• MGMT 664 Leadership: Exploring Styles and 

Developing Con^tencies (3) 

• 3 credit hours from ttie following; 
MGMr-634 High-Perfomiing Teams (1 .5) 
MGNfr-665 Negotiations (3) 
MGNfr-685 Topics in Managment (1 .5-3) 

Master of Business Administration 

and J.D. 

Admission to the Program 

AppUcants must satisfy the admission requirements ofTxjth 
the Kogod School of Business and Wadiington College of Law 
before being adiritted to the program. However, students who 
have been admitted to Washington College of Law will not be 
required to take the GMAT. 
M.B.A. Deg^-ee Requirements 

• 51 credit hotirsof appro\«d graduate course work including 
3 1.5 credit hours of required courses and 19.5 credit hoursof 
electives. 

Up Id 9 credit hours of course woik m^ be waived from 
ACCr-607, FIN-605, and ITEC-610 if students have taken 
equivalent couree woric at the undergraduate level in the past 
seven years, received grades of B or better, and pass an 
exanination during orientation for each course waived. Any 
courses waived by special exertion beyond the 9 (sedits are 
waiwd with replacement of an equal number of credits of 
other couise weak. 

Up to 9 oedit houis earned at another AACffi-accredited 
M.B.A. program (or the LSiiversityof Pais-Diauphine) may 
be transferred and appUed the Kogod MBA requirertEnts. 
A minimum of 30 credits taken m residence fixsn ttie Kogod 
School of Business is required for ttie MBA. 
JD/MBAdual degree policy requires stiaJents to defer taking 
12-15 credit hours of M.B.A. course work, depending on the 
n»m±)er of M-B.A. courses waived, until completion of the 
J.D. degree. 
Course Requirements 
Core (18 credit hours) 

• ACCT-607 Accounting Concepts and Applications (3) 

• FIN-605 Managerial Economics (3) 

• FIN-614 Financial Managpment (3) 

• ITEC-610 Applied Managerial Statistics (3) 

• MGMT-609 Oigani2ational Behavior and Human 

Resource Management (3) 



• MKTG-612 Marketing Management (3) 

Advanced Breadth (133 credit hours) 

• IBUS-6 1 8 Manager in the International Economy (3) 

• rrEC-6 1 2 AppJied ftoduction and Operations 

Management (1.5) 

• rrEC-6 1 6 Management Infomstion Systems (3) 

• MGMT-622 Business, Eftics, and Society (3) j 

or 

ACCr-623 Business Law (3) (may be waived for JD/MBA 
students) 

• MGMT-624 Applied Strategic Management in a Global 

Environment (3) 
Areas of Concentration and Electives (195 credit 
hours) 

• 9 credit hours in an area of concentration 

• 10.5credihoursinlawcanceiirationfromJ-D. course 
work 

JJD. D^iree Requirements 

• 86 credit hours 

The Washington College of Law may give up to a rtBxinum 
of 6 credit hours toward the JJD. for courses taken at the 
Kogod Sdiool, provided they are approved by ttie Joint 
Wadiington College of Law-Kogod Sdiool of Business 
Conmittee. 

Master of Business Administration and 
Master of Laws in International Legal 
Studies (L.L.M.) 

Graduates receive an MJ3.A from the Kogod School of 
Business (KSB) and anLL.M fromflieWaAington College of 
Law (WCL). Neither degree will be awarded until all 
requirements for both degrees are conpleted. 

Admission to the Pro^tim 

Applicants must satisfy the admission requirements of both 
the Kogod School of Business and Wadiington College of Law 
before being admitted to the program. Students rtaist have com- 
pleted their law degree at a U.S. law school acoedited by the 
American Bar Association or at a foreign law school with 
equivalent standards. Admission to the M£.A. requires an in- 
terview, a separate personal statement, additional lettere of rec- 
ommendation, and a GMAT score. 

Students in the MJ3.A./Li.M dual degree program pay tui- 
tion and fees according to the WCL sdiedule. 

D^ree Requirements 

• 52 credit hours including 36 credit hours of approved 
graduate course woik from KSB and 16 credit hours of 
appiDved WCL couise woik 

The first semester in the program must be spent as a full-time 
L.LM student 



KogDd School of Busimss 1S9 



MJBu\. Degree Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate course woric induding 
28.5 credit hours of required courses and 7.5 credit hours of 
ekctivDs; 1 .5 credit hours may be taken in an internship as 
elective credit. 

Course Requremcnts 
Core (18 credit hours) 

• ACCT-607 Accounting Concepts and Applications (3) 

• FIN-605 Managerial Economics (3) 

• FIN-614 Financial Mtaiagement (3) 

• nEC-610 ^plied Managerial Statistics (3) 

• KKjMT-609 Organizational Behavior and Human 

Resource Management (3) 

• MKTO-6 1 2 Maike ting Management (3) 

Advanced Breadth (10^ credit hours) 

• IBUS-61 8 Manager in the tatemational Economy (3) 

• nEC-612 Applied Production and Operations 

Management (1 .5) 

• IIEC-61 6 Management Information Systems (3) 

• MGMT-624 Applied Strategic Management in a Global 

Envinximent (3) 
Etectives(7^ credit hours) 
LXJVf . Degree Requirements 

• 16 credit hours including two research papers; LAW-580 
Introduction to American Legal Institutions (for students wifli 
dvil law backgrounds); English for Lawyers (for students 
who need extra practice wifli English); no intemship credit 
may be ap{^ed toward the L.L.M 

M. S. in Accounting 

The M.S. in Accounting (M.S A.) degreeprovides advanced 
study for students with undergraduate accounting degrees who 
seek a fifih year of jirofessional education to satisfy 150-hour 
CPA Unoensuie requirements. In addition, the program is suffi- 
ciently flexible to prepare both students with non-accounting 
undergraduate business degrees and those with non-business 
undergraduate degrees for accounting careers in a variety of or- 
ganizatioDal settings. The program may be conpleled on a fiill- 
or part-time basis. 
Admission to the R'ogram 

In addition to meeting the university requirements for grad- 
uate study, apiiicanis must have earned a satisfactory score on 
the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and must 
have earned a satisfectory grade point average for the last 60 
hours of academic \wik fiom a Council of Postsecondary Ac- 
creditation (COPA) regjonaUy-acaedited institution. Appli- 
cants whose first language is not Engliiti are also required to 



take the TOEFL (Test of En^ish as a Foreigri Language) and 

demonstrate English language proficiency. 

Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours including a minimum of 15 credit hours in 
graduate accounting course work and 1 5 credit hours in 
ffsdutte business or accouiting electives. 
Across bachelor and M.S. in Accounting degrees combined, 
students mist complete at least 27 credit hours in accounting, 
in addition to specific business core courses. Students 
entering the M.S A. program with undergraduate accounting 
degrees can typically satisfy M.S. A. degree requirements by 
completing 15 graduate accounting hours. The ronaining 15 
credit hours can be used to develop complementary ejgjertise 
in a related field or speciali2Ed expertise in financial reporting 
and assurance or taxation 

Students with non-accounting undergraduate degrees may be 
required to use the 1 5 credit hour elective component to meet 
overall accounting requirements. 

Students entering the program with non-business 
undergraduate degrees may be required to complete graduate 
course work in managerial economics, financial 
management, managerial statistics, and principles of 
accounting, potentially increasing total M.S.A. course 
requirements to a maximum of 36 graduate credit hours. 
On admission to the program, students will consult with the 
program director to deagn an aj^xoved program of study that 
meets bofli overall program goals and individual academic 
ami professional objectives. 
Course Requirements 

• ACCT-607 Accounting Concepts and Aiq)lications (3) 

• FIN-605 Managerial Economics (3) 

• FIN-614 Financial Managonent (3) 

• ITEC-610AppUed Managerial Statistics (3) 

Students with undergraduate degrees from 
AACSB-accredited bieiness programs are presumed to haw 
satisfied this requirement AU or part of this requirement may 
be waived ftir other students who have cornpleted courses in 
principles in accounting, mircoeconomics, financial 
managerrtent, £ind/or statistics. 

• ACCT-608 Cost Accounting (3) 

or 
6 credit hoirs of intermediate financial accounting 

• ACCT-^1 Corpwate Financial Reporting (3) 

or 
3 credit hours of intermediate managaial acxx)unting 

• 3 credit hours in each oftaxation, auditing, and business law 



1 90 Kogod Sdiool of Business 



M. S. in Information Technology 
Management 

The Master of Science in In&rmadon Technology Manage- 
ment (MSriM) program taigets "career enhancers" wiio want 
to pursue leadership positions in information technology (IT). 
The program blends topics fiom IT with relevant business p»ac- 
tioe and also eniphasi2Bs management skill development. The 
goal of the MSITM program is to educate IT practitioners to be 
prepared to procure, develop, deploy, and manage international, 
enterprise-wide infontBtion systems and information technol- 
ogy services 
Admission tD the Program 

In addition to meeting flie university requirements for grad- 
uate study, ^jplicants rtust have earned a satisfactory score on 
the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAF), irust have 
earned a satisfectory grade point average for the last 60 hours of 
academic work fiom a Council ofPostsecondary Accreditation 
(CDPA) regionally-accredited institution, must have taken un- 
dergraduate courses in economics, statistics and at least cne 
ofcer college-level mafiiematics course such as appUed cafcu- 
lus, and must understand information technology (IT) system 
development concepts as they relsie to contetiq)orary program- 
ming langu^es or system development tools. AppUcants niist 
have three or more years of wodc experience in an IT-related 
field. Admission is for the fall semester only 
Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours consisting of six 3-CTiedit courses, six 
l.S-credit modules and 3 credit hows of epproved electives 

• The research requirement is fulfilled by completing 
ITEC-708 and rrEC-71 1 with grades of B or better. 

Course Requirements 

• ITEC-700 Infcrmatbn Systems Organi2ation and 

Infonnation Technobgy Staffing (3) 

• llbC-701 Architectures and Infi^stmctures for Delivering 

Information Technobgy Services (1.5) 

• rrEC-702Quantitative Methods for hifonnation 

Technology Managers (1 .5) 

• ITEC-703 Distributed Database Management (3) 

• rrEC-704 Finance and Accounting for Information 

Teclmology Managers (3) 
or 
FIN-630 Financial Analysis: Concepts and AppUcations (3) 

• rrEC-705 Information Technology Systems Analysis 

and Design (3) 

• HbC-707 Information Technology Operations 

Management (1.5) 

• ITEC-708 Informatbn Technology Systans Engineering 

and Project Management (3) (with a grade of B or 
better) 

• llEC-709 Business De vetopment and Marketing fcr 

Information Tedtinology Management (1.5) 



• nEC-7 10 Managing the Global Information Technology 

Organization (1.5) 

• rrEC-7 1 1 Intbnnation Services Delivery Princqjles for 

Infonnation Technobgy Managers (3) (with a 
grade B or better) 

• rrEC-7 1 2 Information Security Management (1.5) 

• 3 credit hours of graduate electives as approved by the 
studaif s adviscB- 

M. S. in Management 

The Master of Science in Management (M.S.M.) program 
provides graduate business msmagemait education for students 
to develop ttteir analytical, business, and management skills. 
The MS.M. is a one-year graduate business pan gram which en- 
coopasses business perspectives required by by AACSB Inter- 
national, the Association to Advance Collegiate Sdwols of 
Business. 
Admission to the Program 

In addition to meeting the university requirements for grad- 
uate study, c^licants nust have earned a setisfactory score on 
the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAF) and nust 
have earned a satisfectory grade point average for the last 60 
hours of academic woik fixan a Councal ofPostsecondary Ac- 
creditation (COPA) regionally-accredited institution AppU- 
cants whose first language is not English are also required to 
take the TOEFL (Test of Enghsh as a Foreign Language) and 
demonstrate F-ngtish language proficieacy. 

Degree Requirements 

• 30 credit hours of graduate course \wik 

• The research requiremait is fulfilled by con^leting the 
following courses with grades of B or better. 
IBUS-636 Global Strategy and Management 
MGMr-633 Leading People and Oiganiations 
MGMT-635 Ettiics, Social Responsibility and Governance 

• Orientation requirement: All students are required to 
participate in the oriraitation to business pogram prior to the 
start of classes. 

Course Requirements 

Core Courses (18 credit hours) 

• FIN-630 Financial Analysis: Concepts and Applications (3) 

• IBUS-636 Gtobal Strategy and Management (1.5) 

• IBUS-637Cross-Cultural Management (1.5) 

• ITEC-631 Operations and Information Managemeitf (3) 

• MQMT-633 Leading People and Organizations (3) 

• MGMT-634High-Perfomang Teams (1.5) 

• MGMT-635 Efcics, Social Responsibility and 

Governance (1.5) 

• MKTO-632 Fundamentals of Marketing (3) 



KogodSdiool of Business 191 



Elective Courses (12 credit hours) 

• 12 credit hours in graduate coune work as approved by the 
progron director and selected fitm Kogod graduate courses 
or graduate courses oflerings from other American 
Univeisity teaching units, subject to any prerequisite& Witti 
approval, MSM students may earn elective credit for an 
inlemdiip during the tinal semester of their program. 

M.S. in Taxation 

The M.S. in Taxation provides a professionally -oriented 
specialty master's degree fbciKing on fedetBl income taxatioa 
It is designed Id advance students ' careers and broaden their op- 
tions with skills in specialized areas and comprehensive exper- 
tise in the field of taxation. Most students are CPAs engaged in 
public or private tax practice, empJoyed by ttie govemmert, 
"big 4," regional, and local CPA firms, and a variety of private 
sector organizations These students contribute to a very chal- 
lenging, practical, and professional study of taxaticm. This con- 
venient )«t demanding program facUitates c^jportunities wifti 
the largest professional service organizations in the worid, en- 
hances flexible career pa&s, and creates opportunities fcr stall- 
ing businesses 

Admissioa to the i^ognim 

In addition to meeting the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study, appUcants imst have earned an undergradu- 
ate bachekir's degree in business administraticn fiom a Coundl 
on Ftost Secondary Accreditation (COPA) regionally-accredited 
institution with a satisfactory grade point average for the last 60 
credit hours and a satisfactory score on ttie Graduate Manage- 
mer* Admission Test (GMAT). Students who have successfully 
convicted the CPA examination may substitute it for the 
GMAF. 

Applicants must demonstrate satis&ctory completion of 
couise woik e<fjivalent to the ComnDn Body of Knowledge fcr 
undergraduate business education as currently defined by 
AACSB International the Aasocittion to Advance Collegiate 
Sdnols of Business In addition, apjiicaiils must have corrpleted 
two semesters of iitermediate accounting and one semester of 



busiiess bw, federal income taxation, and macroeconomics Any 
deficiencies in these prerequisite couises mist be corrpleted at te 
gradiatc fcvel at ArrErican Univeisity afler adrtission to the pn> 
grarn in addition to other jiDgram requirements M.S. in Taxation 
students ate subject to the same mathematics competency i«quire- 
merts as MBA students. 
Deg^iee Heqiurements 

• 30 credit hours including two required core tax courses (6 
oedit hours), a research conponent (6 credit hoiis), and six 
elective tax courses (18 credit hours) 

Coirse Requremoits 

Core Tax Courses (6 credit haiirs) 

• ACCT^30 Legislative and Judicial Foundations of 

Lncome Tax (3) 

• ACCT-631 Tax Research aiKl Procedure (3) 

Research Componrat (6 cre<fit hours) 

• 6credithoinswifligradesofBorbetterfit)mthefolIowing: 
ACCT-740 Taxation of Corporations (3) 

ACCT-743 International Taxation (3) 
ACCT-746 Taxation of Real Estate Transactions (3) 
ACCT-747 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities (3) 
ACCT-7 50 Tax ft)licy (3 ) 
ACCT-751 Seminar in Business Tax Rammg (3) 
Elective Courses (18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours fiom the following (courses may mt be used 
to fiilfill the research requirement (abow) and as an elective); 
ACCT-«32 Estate and Gift Tax (3) 

ACCT-740 Taxation of Corporations (3) 
ACCT-741 State and Local Taxation (3) 
ACCT-742 Special Tax Topics (1-3) 
ACCT-743 International Taxation (3) 
ACCT-745 En5)byee Benefit Tax Planning (3) 
ACCT-746 Taxation of Real Estate Tianactions (3) 
ACCT-747 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities (3) 
ACCT-750TaxBDlicy(3) 
ACCT-75 1 Seminar in Business Tax Hatming (3) 
ACCT-7 52 Seminar in FamUy Financial Planning (3) 



School of Communication 

• Administration and Faculty 

• Undergraduate Programs 

• Graduate Programs 



Dean Larry Kiikman 

Senior Associate Dean Rodger A Streitmatter 
AssociMe Dean for Student and Academic Aflairs 
Rose Ann Robertson 

Assistant Dean for Budget and 'Kchnology Patrick Maitin 
Full Time Faculty 

Professor Elmeritus/a LB. Anderson, QR Hamdeo, 
J A Hmdrix, J.E. Orvrant, RE. Sutton, L.W Wolison, 
J.S. Yamaudii 

Professor P. Aufdertieide, L. Kiikman, L. Masaah, 
K. Montgomery, C. Sinpson, R.A Streitmatter 
Associate Professor Emeritus/a B.J. Diggs Brown, 
LM. Furber, J.C. Seigte, A. Zelle 
Associate Professor R. Blair, J. Campbell, W. Cochran, 
J.C. Doolittle, J.S. Douglass, C. Gilbert, J. Hall, JA. Omsted, 
R Rockwell, R.A Stack, L. Steinhoni, W. Swalbw, 
J. Watson, RS. Zahama 

Assistant Professor L. Engel, L. GiUick, J. Qtui, DC. Hayes, 
B. HinBwan, M. Ivandn, L. Jayaawal, IB. Krasnow, B.R Liu, 
B. Mater, S. Menke-Fish, M Nisbet, G Pu^i , D. Sdiwartz, 
M. Stogner 

Distinguished Joumalist-in-Residence C. Lewis 
Distinguished Producer-in-Residence C. Palmer 
Execut(ve-in-ResideDce D. Lynch 
Artist-in-Residence W Gentile, R >MUiams, Q GrifEn 
Joumahst-in-Residence L Petri, M Ma(£)onald 
Adjunct-in^esidence A. Schafer, L. Bream, D. Walker 
Teaching Staff A. Eistnan 

Tte goal offlie School of CcmmiaiicatiDn (SOC) is to develop 
liberally educated and professionally trained oommmicatcrs who 
are equipped intellectually and ethically to aiBly2£ and report tiie 
issues rfcortempoiary society. The sdiool makes fiill use of the 
resources of Washington, D.C., fee comnunication capital of the 
world and one of to largjsst rrwlia production centers in ttie coun- 
try. The school's handson, practical programs t^ flie eqjerts at 
work in WaAington, irxduding TV, radio, print, and orihrte jour- 
nalists; media strategists in to norfsofit, government, and pditi- 
cal arenas; and docutrentary, educatioD, and social advocacy 
media producers. Internships work opportunities, and class as- 
sigrmats in tiie nation '^capital aUcantnbute to experience-based 



learning The school's state-ottiie-art tedmotogy supports student 
reaearcii, writing, photography, vitbo and film {trodicticxi, digital 
video editing motion graphics pgoduction, w«b aj&oring, and 
graphic design. In addition, about oDe-dmd of SOC studrarts grin 
international experience by spending a semester abroad through 
AU Atroad programs in countries around the world. 

The school is comprised of three divisions, each oflFering un- 
dergraduate and graduate prograrrs: 

Flm and Media Arts includes &e undergraduate visual me- 
dia jjrogram and ^aduate film and electronic media prograoB. 
Students may study documentary or narrative iilrnmaking, digital 
media, or photography. A wedcend graduate program offers a 
rrBSter^ in pioducing fir film and video, and the Summer Film 
and Digital Media Institute provides hands-on experience for both 
exp^eiKed and beginning film and digital media professionals. 
JoumaUsm offers undapaduate and graduate degree pro- 
grams in print and broadcast journalism The master's degree in 
joumalisim and pubUc afiairs includes specializations in pubhc 
poUcy, economic, and international journalism. 'Wfeekend rrBS- 
ter's programs are offered in interactive journalism and news 
rredia studies. 

Public ConununicatuHi has uixlergradiiate and graduate 
pHDgrams thi focus on the develqxneri of trediamessages and 
strategies for social advocacy, political conmurricatioD, enter- 
tainmerS communication, and international cormmnication. 

Tte school also ofiers an undergraduate major in commini- 
cftion studies, as weU as an inteidisciplinaiy program offered 
jointly with flie CoUege of Arts and Sciences— tte B .A in For- 
eign L^anguage and Communication Nffedia An undergraduate 
minor in comnuiiicatiaa, designed for users and consuners of 
mass itedia ratha* tiian practitioners, also is available. 

Tte SOC fiill-time faculty blends traditional academic 
scjiolarship with hands-on jjrofessional experience. Faculty 
regulariy develop gromd-breaking courses, publidi books and 
articles, speak at rBtional and international conferences and fo- 
ruBS, produce award-winning films, work for social justice, and 
hdp shape ethical practices in thdr individual fiekis. Full-time 
faculty have won Emrr^s and Acaderr^ Awards, been nomi- 
nated for PuUtza" Prizes, and worked on presidential cam- 
paigns. SOC also appoints outstanding adjunct faculty, who 
bring depth and insight into the classroom 

For more inforrtBtion go to: http://30c.artBrican.edu/ 



192 



School of Ccmmunicaticm 193 



Undergraduate Programs 



Note: Any student who has earned 60 credit hours and has not 
achieveda cunwlative grade point average of 250 will not be al- 
lowed to take courses in ttie school 

A strong Uberal arts background is enphasized by the 
school. To ensure that comrtiunication majors attain this back- 
ground, a sigmiicant portion of underpaduate cou-se work is 
taken outside the field of communicatioa 

All studaits intending to major in oomminication begin to 
take core courses during their freshman and sophomore years. 
During the freshmai year CCMM-100 Understanding Mass 
Media is required for all studaits and CCMM-200 Writing for 
Mass CorrmunicatiDn is usually required during the sophomore 
year. Visual media majors also take COMM-105 during the 
trediman year, public communication mqors take COMM-209 
Comnurrication and Society during the sojAomore year, and 
joumahsm mqors take CX)MM-320 Reporting following Writ- 
ing for Mass Comminicatioa 

Students continue with one of the programs (print or broad- 
cast journalism, pubUc oommmication, visual media or com- 
mumcation studies) and take a series of carefully chosen skills 
courses, and commmication media studies ccwrses which ex- 
amine the history, current issues, and future of communicatioo 
and the media The abiUty to write correctly and clearly is 
stresed in all programs. 

B.A. in Communication: 
Communication Studies 

AdmissioD to the IVogram 

Formal admission to tiie major requires a cumilative grade 
point average of 2.50 (on a 4.00 scale). Students should declare 
their major by the erd of the sophomare year and no earher than 
the end of the freshnsin year. 

Students who are urable to achieve a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.50 and declare a major in oommmication are nrt 
allowed to take courses in the schod after they have completed 
60 hours of undergraduate credit. 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college matheriBtics or flie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencourses,consistingofor3efoundationcourseand 
one second4evel course in an appDved sequence fromeadr 
of the five curricular areas 

• >Jo rrwre than 6 credit hours may be taken in the sans 
discipline 

Concentrations 

History of the Media, International Media, Media and Qovan- 

ment, or Media and Society 



Major Requirements 

• A minimum of 36 and a rmximrm of 40 credit hours witti 
grades of C or better within the School of Corrwinmication 
including core, ncdia ^hicsand legal aspects, concentration, 
and media studies courses. 

• Related course requirements taken outside the School of 
Commmication with grades of C or better 

• A minimum of 80 credit hours outside the field of 
communication, including 65 credit hours in the liberal arts 
and sciences, are required fin" the major. 

Subject to the approval of an advisor, a maximim of 1 2 credit 
hours in commmication transferred fiom another university 
maybe substituted fisr required comnunication coirses. Trans- 
fer studeris majoring in commmication studies are required to 
graduate with a total of 80 credit hours outside the field of com- 
munication. 

Related Course Requii^nents 
Students must CO rrplete the following with grades ofC orbetter 

• 3 credit hovts in American history (HIST-xxx) 

• 3 credit hours in economics (ECON-xxx) 

• A minor or second major outside the School of 
Commmication 

Communication Cburse Requirements 
(36 credit hours) 

Core Courses (15 o^it hours) 

• COMM-10(yCOMM-100GUnderstandingMass 

Media 4: 1(3) 

• COMM-105/COMM-105G Visual Literacy 1 ;1 (3) 

• COMM-200 Writing for Mass Commmication (3) 

• OOMM-301Pubhc Relations (3) 

• COMM-320 Reporting (3) 

Media and Legal Ethics Courses (3 credit i»urs) 

• One of the following: 

COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Comraunication Q) 
COMM-504 JoumaUan Ethics (3) 
COMM-533 Ethical ftrsuasion (3) 
History of the Media ConcentratiDn (18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours fiom the following: 
COMM-209 Communicaticn and Sodety (3) 
COMM-27Q/COMM-270GHOW the News Media Shaped 

lfistory2:2(3) 
COMM-275/COMM-275Q Dissident Media: Vdoes fiom 

the Underground 4:2 (3) 
COMM-401 Legal Adjects of Comnwnication (3) if rut 

used to fiilffll media and ethics requirement aboMS 
OOMM-504 Journalism Ethics (3) if i»t used to frilfill 

media and ethics requiremait above 
COMM-505 History of Broadcast Joiroalian (3) 



1 94 School of Communication 



COMM-511 History of DocunBntaiy (3) 
COMM-514 Censorehip and tte Media (3) 
COMM-51 6 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) with 

permissian of the student's advisor 
COMM-51 7 Mstoiy of Cross-cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 Kstory of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 Mstory of Photography (3 ) 
COMM-533 Ethical Persuasion (3) if not used to fulfill 

media and ethics requirement sbove 
COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media (3) with 

pemissicD of fee student's advisor 
COMM-547 Great Books in U.S. Journalism (3) 
COMM-586 History of Czech Cinema (3) (Prague) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
COMM-599 Media, Technology and Society (3) 
COMM-391 hitemAip (3) 

or 

COMM^91 Smior Professional hitemship (3) 
an approved elective outside of SOC 
International Media Conceotnition (18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours from the following; 
COMM-280/OOMM-280G Contemporary Media in a 

Global Society 3:2 (3) 
COMM-507 News Media in ftitain (3) (London) 
COMM-51 6 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) with 

permissico of flie student's advisor 
COMM-517 Kstoryof Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media (3) with 

permission of flie student's advisor 
COMM-539 International Public Relations (3) 
COMM-546 Foreign Policy arxl the Press (3) 
COMM-548 Qobal Joumahsrn Issues and Trends in the 

Twenty-First Century (3) 
COMM-549 Topics in Intemational Media (3) 
COMM-585 Directing (3) (Prague) 
COMM-391 totemship (3) 

or 
COMM-491 SaiiorProfessiorBl Internship (3) 
an approved elective outside of SOC 

Media and Government Concentration 
(18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours from the following: 
COMM-Z70/OOMM-270G How tte News Media Shaped 

History 22 (3) 
COMM-275/OOMM-275G Dissident Media: Voices from 

the Ltaderground 4:2 (3) 
COMM-327 The PR Presidency (3) 
COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Corrrnunication (3) if not 

used to fulfill media and ethics requiremait above 
COMM-504 JoumaKan Ethics (3) if not used to fiilfill 

media and ethics requirement above 



COMM-508 The Media and aovemment (3) 
COMM-509 PoUticsand the Media (3) 
COMM-514 Censorship and the Media (3) 
COMM-51 5 Media, Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-51 6 Topics in Fikn and Media Arts (3) with 

permission of the student's advisor 
COMM-531 Political Conmumcation (3) 
COMM-533 Ethical Persuasion (3) if not used to fiilfill 

media and ethics requireriKnt above 
COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media (3) with 

permission of ttie student's advisor 
COMM-391 htemdiip (3) 
or 

COMM-491 Soiior Professional hrtemship (3) 
an approved elective outside of SOC 
Media and Society Concentration (18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours fiwrnthe following: 
COMM-209 Comnunication and Society (3) 
COMM-270/OOMM-270G How the News Media Shaped 

History 22 (3) 
COMM-Z75/OOMM-275G Dissidait Media: Vbioes fitim 

the Uiderground 4:2 (3) 
COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Corniwnication (3) if not 
used to fidfill media and ethics requirement above 
COMM-504 Journalism Ethics (3) if not used to fiilfill 

media and ethics requirement above 
COMM-51 Women in Joumahsm (3) 
COMM-511 Mstory of Documentary (3) 
COMM-514 Censorship and the Media (3) 
COMM-51 5 Media, Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-51 6 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) with 

permission of the student's advisor 
COMM-517 Mstoryof Cross-Cultural CinerrB(3) 
COMM-533 Ethical Persuasion (3) if not used to fiilfill 

media and ethics requirertent above 
COMM-534 Race, Gendsr, and fee Media (3) 
COMM-558 Sirvey of American Cinema (3) 
COMM-599 Media, Technology and Sodety (3) 
COMM-391 Intemdiip (3) 
or 

COMM-491 Saiior Professional Internship (3) 
an approved elective outside of SOC 
University K>nor$ Program 

Students in fee University HorMTS Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate wife University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students oomjJete 12 hours of advanced4evel Honors work 
in fee school and, upon fee school's recommendation, graduate 
wife University Hanorsin the major. The school's Honors coor- 
dinator advises students in the University Honors Program re- 
garding school options. 



School of CornmiaiicatioD 195 



B.A. in Communication: Journalism 

AdmissioD to the Phogram 

FomHl admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.5() (ona 4.00 scale). Students should declare 
their majcr by the end o f the sophomore year and no earUer than 
the end of the freshman year. 

Students who are unable to achieve a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.50 and declare a major in comminication are not 
allowed to take courses in the school after they have completed 
60 hours of undergraduate credit. 
University Requirctnents 

• Atotalofl20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours ofcoUege writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mathematics or flie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• AtotaloftBncourses.oonsistingofonefoundationcouraeand 
one seoond4evel course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Tracks 

Broadcast Journalism or Print Journalism 

Major Requirements 

• A minimum of 36 and a maximim of 40 credit hours wife 
grades of C or better within the School of Conmunication 
including core, professional, media studies, internship, 
independent study, and independent reading courses. 

• Related course lequiiements taken outside the School of 
Comminication with grades of C or better 

• A minimum of 80 credit hours outside the field of 
communication, including 65 credit hours in the liberal arts 
and sciences, are required fijr the major 

Subject to the approval of an advisor, a maximmi of 12 credit 
honrs in comminication transferred from another university 
may be substituted for required communication courses. Trans- 
fer students mqoring in journalism are required to graduate with 
a total of 80 credit hours outside the field of oomrrunication- 
Related Course Requirements 
Students must complete the following wifii grades ofC orbetter 

• 3 credit hours in American history (HIST-xxx) 

• 3 credit hours in economics (ECON-xxx) 

• A minor or second major outside the School of 
Comminication 

CommunicatiDn Gourse Requirements 
(36 credit hours) 

Core Courses (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-lOCVCOMM-lOOGUnderstandingMass 

Media 4: 1(3) 

• COMM-200 Writing &r Mass Comnunication (3) 



• COMM-320 Reporting (3) 

Broadcast Journalism H-ack (27 credit hours) 

• a)MM-333 Fundamentals of TV and VFR (3) 

• (T)MM-385 Broadcast Joumalian I (3) 

• CX)MM-401 Legal Aipectsof Communication P) 

• COMM-428 Broadcast JoumaUam n (3) 

• CX)MM-432 Television Field Reporting (3) 

• Four courses from the following 
OOMM-27(yCOMM-270GHowthe News Media Shqjed 

Histor/2:2(3) 

or 
OOMM-27VCOMM-275G Dissident Media Voices from 

the Underground 4: 2 (3) 
or 
COMM-280/COMM-280G Corrtemporary Media in a 

aobal Society 3:2 (3) 
OOMM-391 hitemship(3) 

or 
OOMM-392 Cooperative Education Field Bqjerience (3) 

or 

COMM-491 Senior Professional Internship (3) 
COMM-396 Selected Topics (3) with permission of the 

student's advisor 
COMM-433 Broadcast Delivery (3) 
OOMM-490 Independent Study Project (3) 
COMM-503 Broadcast Opraations and Management (3) 
COMM-504 JoumaUan Ethics (3) 
COMM-505 History of Broadcast Joumalian (3) 
COMM-508 The Media and OovemnKnt (3) 
COMM-509PoUlics and ths Media (3) 
COMM-510 Women in Joumalian (3) 
COMM-511 History of Documentary (3) 

or 

COMM-5 15 Media, Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-514 Censorship aixl the Media (3) 
COMM-5 1 6 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) 
COMM-546 Foreign PtoUcy and the R«ss (3) 
COMM-547 Great Books in U.S. Joumahsm (3) 
COMM-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of the 

student's advisor 
COMM-599 Media, Technology and Society (3) 

Print Journalism Itack ^7 credit hours) 

• COMM-322 Editorial PoUdes and Methods (3) 

• COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

• COMM-425 Advanced Reporting (3) 

• Three courses firm the following 

COMM-323 Computer Techiriques for Comnunicatian 

Studies (3) 
OOMM-325 Feature Article Writing (3) 
COMM-330PriiBiples of Photography (3) 



1 96 School of Coninwnication 

COMM-391 IrtemAtp (3) 
or 

COMM-392 Cooperative Education Field E^qjaience (3) 
or 
COMM-491 Saiior Professional Internship (3) 
COMM-502 hi-Depth Jounalism (3) 
COMM-521 Opinion Writing (3) 
COMM-545 Business and Economic Journalism (3) 
COMM-596 Sdected Topics (3) wifli pentdssion of the 
student's advisor 
• Three courses fixjm the following: 

COMM-270/CDMM-270G How the News Media SSiaped 
Histoiy 2-2 (3) 
or 
COMM-275/C»MM-275G Dissidant Media: Voices fixjm 
the Ltadeiground 4:2 (3) 
or 
COMM-280/(X)MM-280G Contemporaiy Media in a 

Global Society 3:2 (3) 
COMM-396 Selected Topics (3) witti pemrission of the 

student's advisOT 
COMM-490 ^dependent Study Project (3) 
COMM-504 JoumaKsm Ethics (3) 
COMM-505 Kstoiy of Broadcast Journalism (3) 
COMM-508 The Media and Government (3) 
COMM-509 PoUtics and the Media (3) 
COMM-510 Women in Journalism (3) 
COMM-511 MstoryofDocuinentaiy(3) 

or 
COMM-515 Media, Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-514 Censoidiip and tlK Media (3) 
COMM-546 Foreign Policy and the Press (3) 
COMM-547 Great Books in U.S. Journalism (3) 
COMM-596 Selected Topics (3) wifti penrdssion of the 

student's adviscr 
COMM-599 Media, Technology and Society (3) 
Umvenity K>nors Program 

Students in the Univeraty Jfonors I'rogram have fee oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors work 
in the school and, upon the school's reanrunendation, graduate 
with University Honors in the major. The school's Honors coor- 
dinator advises students in ttie University Honors Program re- 
garding school options. 



B.A. in Communication: 
Public Communication 



Admisson to the Program 

Formal admission to the major requires a cumulative grade 
pdnt average of 250 (on a 4.00 scale). Students ^ould declare 
their mqor by the end of the sophotmre year and no eailier than 
the end of the fie^unan year 

Students who are unable to achieve a cumulative grade point 
average of Z50 and declare a mqor in conmunication are not 
allowed to take courses in the school after they have conpleted 
60 hours of undergraduate credit. 
University ReqiiD«meiits 

• A total of 1 20 credit houis 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of coUege mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting ofonefoindation course and 
one second-level course in an a[^}roved sequence fiom eadi 
of &e five curdcular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
disc^line 

Major Requirements 

• 39credithDurswithgradesofCorbetterwithintheSchodof 
Communicatica including core, professional, intemship, 
independait study, and independent reading courses 

• Related course requirements taken outside file School of 
Communication with grades ofC or better 

• A minimum of 81 credit hours outside the field of 
communication, including at least 65 credit houis in the 
hbeial arts and sciences, are required for the major. 

Subject to the approval of an advisor, a maximum of 12 credit 
hours in conmunication trans fened from another university 
nay be substituted for required communication courses. Trans- 
fer students majoring in public communication are required to 
graduate with a total of 84 credit hours outside the field of com- 
mmication. 

Related Coirse Requirement 
Students must coirplete the following with giadesof C or better 

• 3 credit hours in American history (HIST-xxx) 

• 3 credit hours in ecooonucs (KJON-xxx) 

or 

MKTG-250 Fundamentals of Business and Mariceting for 
Cormunications (3) 

• A minor or second major outside the School of 
Conmunicatian 

Communication Course Requirements (39 credit hours) 
Core Courses (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-lOO/COMM-lOOGUokretandingMass 

Media 4: 1(3) 



School of ConjmunicatiDn 197 



• CX)MM-200 Writing for Mass Comnunication (3) 

• CX)MM-209 Corrmunicaticn and Sodety (3) 

Professional Courses (30 credit hours) 

• OOMM-301 Pxiblic Relations (3) 

• OOMM-337 Public Relations Writing (3) 

• OOMM-346 Public Relaticns Csse Studies (3) 

• <X)MM-380 Public C^ommunication Research (3) 

• COMM-437 Public Relations Portfolio (3) 

• 1 5 credit hours trom the foUo wing, with no more ttian 9 credit 
hours from any one cluster 

Skills 

CX3MM-105/COMM-105G Visual Literacy 1 : 1 (3) 

OOMM-310 PubUc Speaking (3) 

COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 

COMM-521 Opiiion Writing (3) 

COMM-532 Publication Layout and Design (3) 

COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media 
Magazine Writing (3) 
Human Communication 

COMM-300 Interpersonal Comnunication (3) 

COMM-470 Organizational Comnunication (3) 

COMM-47 2 Nonverbal Communication (3) 

COMM-475 Group Cormnunication Management (3) 
Media Studies 

COMM-327 The PR Residency (3) 

COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

COMM-509 Politics and the Media (3) 

COMM-5 14 Censorship and Media (3) 

COMM-51 5 Media, Children, airi Society (3) 

COMM-533 Ethical ftrsuasion (3) 

COMM-534 Race, Glider, and ftie Media (3) 
The Practice ofPMic Relations 

COMM-531 Political Comnunication (3) 

COMM-536 Entertainment Comnunication (3) 

OOMM-537 Sports Cornnwnication (3) 

COMM-539 International Public Relations (3) 
Experiential Education 

Amaximumof 3 credit hours from: 

COMM-391 Internship (3) 

OOMM-392Coopaative Education Fidd Ejqwrience (3) 

OOMM-491 Senior Professicnal Irtemdiip (3) 
University Honors Pro^^m 

Students in the University Honors Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with Ltoiversity Honors in the major To do 
so, students complete 12hoursof £>dvanced-level Honors woric 
in the school and, upon the school's recctnmendation, graduate 
with University Honors in the majot The school's Honors coor- 
dinator advises students in the University Hcmors Program re- 
garding school options. 



B.A. in Communication: Visual Media 

Admission to the hvgram 

Formal admission to the major requires a cunulative grade 
point average of 2.50 (on a 4.0() scale). Students should declare 
their major by the end of the sophomore year snd no earlier than 
the end of the treshman year. 

Students who are unable to achieve acumulative grade point 
average of 2.50 and declare a major in comnunication are nc* 
allowed to take courses in the school after they have completed 
60 hours of undergraduate credit. 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hou^ of college mathematics or ttie equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencomses, consisting ofonefoundationcowse and 
one seoond4evel course in an approved sequence from each 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 39-42 credit hours with grades of C or better within the 
School of Communication including core, basic, 
professional, media studies, internship, independent study 
and independent reading courses 

• Related course requirements taken outside the School of 
Comnunication with grades of C or better 

Subject to the approval of an advisor, a maximim of 1 2 credit 
hoirs in comrtunication transferred fiom another university 
may be substituted for required communication courses. 
Related Course Requirement 
Studentsmustoorrplete the following wifti gradesofC orbetter 

• 3 credit hours in American histoiy (HIST-axx) 

• 3 credit hours in economics (ECON-xxx) 

or 

MKTG-250 Fundamentals of Business and Marketing for 
Commimications (3) 

• A minor or second major outside the School of 
Comnunication 

Course Requirements (39-42 credit hours) 
Core Courses (9 credit hours) 

• OOMM-lOO/COMM-lOOGUnderstandingMass 

Media 4; 1(3) 

• COMM-105/COMM-105G Visual Literacy 1 : 1 (3) 

• COMM-200 Writing for Mass Comnunication (3) 

Baac Courses (9-12 credit hours) 

• COMM-330 Principles of Photography (3) 

• COMM-331FilmandVideoProductiDnI(3) 



1 98 School of Conimunication 



• One or both of the following: 
COMM-350 Digital Imaging and Design (3) 
COMM-352 Web Studio (3) 

Professional Courses (15-18 credit hours) 

Intermediate (9 credit hours) 

• COMM^2 Writing for Visual Media (3) 

• At least 6 credit hours from the folbwing: 
COMM-434 Fihn and Video Production n (3) 
COMM-435 Introduction to Studio Television (3) 
COMM-454 Motion Graphics and Efifecfe (3) 
COMM-523 hitermediate Photography: 

Photojounialism (3) 
Fine Arts Photography (3) 
Advanced 

• 6 credit hours in visual media studies fiomthe following 
COMM-503 Bxiadcast Operations and Managemeot (3) 
COMM-511 History of Documentaiy (3) 
COMM-51 3 Produdng Rhn and Video (3) 
COMM-514 Censorship and Media (3) 

COMM-51 5 Media, Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-51 6 Topics in Film and Media Arts (3) 
COMM-517 History of Cross-Cultural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 Mstory of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 Mstory of Fhotogr^hy (3) 
COMM-550 Financing and Maiketing Independent 

Productions (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
COMM-585 Directing (3) (Prague) 
COMM-586 Mstory of Czech Cinema (3) (Prague) 

• Additional credit hours may be selected fhjm the fo Uowing to 
bring the total to 39-42 credit hours: 

COMM-438 Production Fiacticum (1 -3) 
COMM-456 Dramatic Production (3) 
COMM-464 Directing for Camera (3) 
COMM^6 Documentaiy Production (3) 
COMM-391 Senior hitemship (3) 

or 
COMM-392 Coopaative Education Field DqperiBnce (3) 

or 

COMM-491 Saiior Professional Internship (3) 
COMM-529 Large Formd and Commercial Photography (3) 
COMM-561 Advanced Writing for Fihn (3) 
COMM-562 Advanced VMting for Television (3) 
COMM-565 Advanced Visual Media Portfoho (3) 
COMM-584 Film Technology and ftactioe (6) (Prague) 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors Pro-am have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so. Students oompiete 12 hours of advanoed4evel Honors work 
in the school and, upon the school's recommendation, graduate 
with University Honors in the major. The school'sHonors coor- 



dinator advises students in the University Honors Program 
regarding sdiool options. 

B.A. in Foreign Language and 
Communication Media 

Admission to the Program 

Students are admitted either to the School of Communica- 
tion or to the DepartmHit of Language and Foreign Studies of 
the College of Arts and Sciaices. 
Program Tracks 

French, German, Russian, or Spanish combined with 
Broadcast JoumaUsm, Print Joumalian, Public Comnunica- 
tion, or Visual Media 
University Requirements 

• Atotalof 120aedithouis 

• 6 credit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of coUege mathematics or the equivalent by 
examination 

General Education Requirements 

• A total often courses, consisting ofone foundation course and 
one second-level course in an ^^iroved sequence fiwn eadi 
of ttie five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in ttie same 
discpUne 

Major Requirements 

• 54 credit hours with grades of C or better 

• Prerequisite competency in the major language at the 
intermediate level 

Course Requirements 

• COMM-lOO/OOMM-lOOGUnleretandingMffis 

Media 4: 1(3) 

• COMM-200 Witing for Mass Comnunication (3) 

• Three communication and media studies coiases fiom the 
School of Communication 

• Two approved courses related to any contemporary culture 

• One of the following 
ANTH-225/ANrH-225G Language and Human 

Expaienoe 1:2(3) 
ANTH-254 Language and Culture (3) 
TESL-5xx linguistics course as approved by advisor 

• Five fxofessional courses in one of the four communication 
program tracks: broadcast journalism, print journalism, 
public communication, or visual media 

• 15 credit hours of courses in the major language at the 300 
level or above takai in the Department of Language and 
Foreign Studies 

University Ifonors Program 

Students in the University Ifonors ftogram have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors work 



School of Comminication 199 



in the department and, upon departmental iccommendation, 
graduate with University Honors in the major. The depart- 
ment's Honors coordinator advises students in the University 
I lonors Program regardiiig departnsntal optioos. 

Washington Semester in Journalism 

This one-semester undergraduate programexploresjoumal- 
ismas it is practiced in \\^shington, D.C. The program studies 
the people, institutions, and issues of \\^shington journalism 
with guest speakers, field trips, and lectures, plus an intemsh^) 
and an elective course selected ftwn regular offerings of the 
university. The program is open to sttidents fiom colleges and 
universities across flie country 
Admisaon to the IVogram 

Requirements for admission to the program are: a ninimum 
grade point average of 2.50 (ona 4.00 scale); either a joumaUsm 
major or a liberal-arts major with aome evidence of interest in 
joumalistn; and at least second-semester sophomcre standing 
Selection is competitive. Note: This program is not open to 
American University comnunication m^ors. 
Course Requirements 

• CX)MM-450WadiingtcnJoimalism Semester Seminar I (4) 

• CDMM-45 1 Wadiingtcn Jounalisn Semester Seninar n (4) 

• OOMM-452 Washington Journalism Semester 

Internship (4) 

• One course fiom the regular university course ofierings 

Minor in Communication 

• IScredithourewithgradesofCarbetterwithatleast 12credit 
hours unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• COMM-lOO/COMM-lOOOUnderstandingMass 

Media 4: 1(3) 

• CX3MM-200 Writing for Mass Connmnication (3) 



Two courses from the following: 
CX)MM-301 Public Relations (3) 
CXDMM-3 10 Public Speaking (3) 
COMM-320 Reporting (3) 
COMM-322 Editorial Polides aal Methods (3) 
CX)MM-325 Feature Article Writing (3) 
CX3MM-330 PriiKiples of Photography (3) 
COMM-33 1 Film and Video Production I (3) 
COMM-435 Introduction to Studio Television (3) 
COMM-470 Organizational Corrmunication (3) 
COMM-472 Nonverbal Communication (3) 
COMM-475 Group Communication Management (3) 
COMM-521 Opinion Writing (3) 
COMM-532 Publication Layout and Design (3) 
Two courses from the following: 
COMM-401 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 
COMM-503 Broadcast Operations and Managenent (3) 
COMM-508 The Media and Government (3) 
COMM-509 Politics and the Media (3) 
OOMM-51 1 History of Documentary (3) 
COMM-5 1 3 Producing Fihn and Video (3) 
COMM-5 1 4 Censorship and Media (3) 
COMM-5 1 5 Media, Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-5 17 History of Cross-Cuhural Cinema (3) 
OOMM-527 History of Photography (3) 
COMM-545 Business and Economic JoumaliaB(3) 
COMM-558 Survey of AtiBrican Cinema (3) 
COMM-596 Selected Topics (3) with permission of the 

student's advisor 
COMM-599 Media, Technology and Society (3) 



200 School of Cormnunication 



Graduate Programs 



Designed for students with diverse professional and educa- 
tional backgrounds, the graduate fsograms fiilly utihs the re- 
sources of Washington, D.C. forbofli field work and classroom 
study. The many professional news organizations, puUic inter- 
est organizations, trade associations, government agencies, 
pubhc relations firms, and media production organizations in 
the Washington area provide excellent opporttmities for intern- 
ships and cooperative education field e^qjerience. Special sani- 
nars and events, including ftje school's American Fotum and 
Media Center presentations, enable students to meet tnqor pub- 
hc figures and fijm and media artists. 

IVLA. in Communication: 

Journalism and Public Affairs 

Admisaon to the Program 

AppUcaits must meet the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study. Admissian to the program requires a bache- 
lor's degree fiom an accredited college or university with at 
least a 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) grade point average in last 60 hours 
of undergraduate course work. International students whose 
first language is rxA Enghsh should take the TOHT.^ examina- 
tion to dermnstrate piuficiaicy in written as well as spoken 
Kngli sh All applicants must earn a satisfactory score on the 
Graduate Record Exairination (GRE) General (verbal, quanti- 
tative, and analytical). 

Previous professicDal or campus e?q}erience in commumca- 
tion is usefiil but not required. However, all apphcarls are requiried 
to show evidence of professional commitment and career direc- 
tion related to the spedalization aid track they choose. OfBcial 
transcripts, two letters of lecommaidation, and a 1,000-word es- 
say on Ifae applicard's comrrdment to pursuing graduate study in 
the prog^m are submitted with the applicatioa If availaUe, sam- 
ples of pubhAed professional or college news writing, scrqjts^ or 
tapes should also be subrrritted. 

A Umited number of graduate fellowships and assistantships 
are awarded on the basis of rrerit as well as school and program 
needs. 

Admission to the full-time degree program is for the fall se- 
mester. Students are generally expected to complete the pro- 
gram in ten months. The program is also available in a weekend 
format which takes twenty mmths to complete (see below). 

Quahfied undergraduate students may apply to a combined 
bachelor's/MA. program and use up to 6 credit hours of 
500-levBl courses to satisfy 4ie requirements of both degrees. 
Degree Requirements 

• 30-33 credit hours of approved graduate work, as advised 
Most students are required to take COMM-624 Princ^iles and 
Practice of Journalism and receive a grade of B or better 
Students who have earned a B or better in a news-naedia law 
course within five years of enrollment may petition to be 
exempted from COMM-601 Legal Aspects of 



Communication. International students are normally 
exerrpted from this course. Students with extensive 
professional editing experience may petition to be exempted 
fit)mCOMM-621 Advanced Editing. 

• Continuous fnH-time enroUmort 

• A grade point average of 3.00 maintatrred duing all work 
toward the degree 

• Comprehensive examination in journalism 
Specializations and Tk^cks 

Pubhc Policy Journalism, Irlemational JoumaUsn, Economic 
Commmication (each taken in either the print or broadcast jour- 
naUsm track). Interactive Joumahsm, or News Media Studies 
Course Requirements 

Public Policy JournaEsm 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• COMM-601 Legal Aspects of Corrmunication (3) 

• COMM-624 Princijies and Practice of JoumaBsm (3) (with 
a grade ofB or better) 

• COMM-71 Soninar in Pubhc Affaiis (3) (wiflj a grade of 
B or better) 

• COMM-724 Reporting ofPuHicAfl&irs (3) 
Electives (12 credit hours) 

• Four elective courses eippro ved by the program director 
One or two courses outside the School of Corarnunication in 
an area related to public af&irs may be substituted for 
joumalismelectiveswithpennissionof the program director. 
Possible areas include political science, public 
administration, history, economics, the rairge of social 
scien;es, and irrtemational relations. 

Broadcast Track (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-632 Tdevisjon Freld Reporting (3) 

• COMM-721 Broadcast News I (3) 

• COMM-722 Eioadcast News II (3) (with a grade ofB or 
better) 

Print Track (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-621 Advanced Editing (3) 

• COMM-636WashingtonReporting(3) 

• COMM-720Saninar in Journalism (3) (witfi a grade ofB 
or better) 

International JoumaBsm 
Core (15 credit hours) 

• COMM-546 Foreign Pohcy and the Press (3) 

• COMM-601 Legal Aspects of Coimiuiiication (3) 

• COMM-624 PrincipJes and Practice of Journalism (3) (witti 
a grade ofB or better) 



SdKX)l of Commuiication 201 



• COMM-710Senimarin Public Affairs (3) (with 
iitemational emphasis and a grade of B or better) 

• CX3MM-724 Reporting of PubUc Afifeirs (3) (witti 
iitemational emphasis) 

Broadcast Track (18 credit hours) 

• COMM-632TelevisianFidd Reporting (3) 

• COMM-721 Broadcast News I (3) 

• (X)MM-722 Broadcast News II (3) (with international 
emphasis and a grade of B cr belter) 

• 9 credit hoirs frum the following 

Two international relations comses outside the School of 
Cormrunicftion 
COMM-xxx elective course 
Print Track (18 credit hours) 

• COMM-621 Advanced Editing (3) 

• COMM-636 WaAington Reporting (3) (with inlemational 
en^hasis) 

• COMM-720 Seninar in Journalism (3) (with a grade of B 
or better) 

• 9 CTedit hoirs frcm flie following 

Two international rel^ons couises outside the School of 
Comminication 
OOMM-xxx elective course 
E^onomk C«iunimication 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• CDMM-601 Legal Aspects of Communication (3) 

• CXDMM-624 Principles and Practice of Joumaliam (3) (with 
a grade of B or better) 

• COMM-7 1 Seninar in Public Affairs (3) (with emphasis 
on ecoDomic and business coverage and with a grade of B 
orbettw) 

• COMM-724 Reporting of PubUc Affairs (3) (wife etn^iasis 
on economic and business coverage) 

Economics (IJcredt hours) 

• 12 credit hours from the following: 
ECON-500 Microeconomics (3) 
BCON-501 Macroeconomics (3) 
BCON-522 Economelrics (3) 
BCON-546 hidustrial Economics (3) 
BCON-573 Labor Economics (3) 
BCON-579 aivironmental Ecoiwmics (3) 
BCON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 
BCON-619U.S. Economic History (3) 

Broadcast Track (9 credit hours) 

• COMM-632 Television Fidd Reporting (3) 

• CDMM-721 Broadcast News I (3) 

• COMM-722 Bioadcast News 11 (3) (with a grade of B or 
better) 



Print Track (9 credit hours) 

• OOMM-545Buainessand Economic Jouraalism(3)(wittia 
ffo&e of B or better) 

• Economics or business elective course (3) 

• OOMM-xxx elective course (3) 

Interactive Joumatisiii 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• COMM-504Joumalian Ethics (3) 

• OOMM-60 1 Leg^ Aspects of Coronuniccdon Q) 

• COMM-7 1 Seminar in Public Affairs (3) (with a grade of 
B or better) 

• COMM-724 Reporting of Public Afiairs (3) (wife an 
enphasis on online research and reporting) 

Interactive Journalism (18 credit hours) 

• COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media (3) 

• COMM-599 Media, Techndogy and Society (3) 

• COMM-621 Advanced Editing (3) 

• OOMM-720 Seninar in Joumaliam (3) ( wifti a grade of B cr 
better) 

• COMM-721 Broadcast News I (3) 

• COMM-502In4>epth Journalism (3) 

or 

COMM-722 Broadcast News II (3) 
or other approved elective course 

News Media Studies 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• COMM-504 Jomnalisn Ethics (3) 

• OOMM-601 Leg^ Aspects of Comrruucation (3) 

• COMM-710Seminarin Public Affairs (3) (withagiade of 
B or better) 

• COMM-724 Reporting of Public At&ars (3) (wifti an 
ettphasis on how stories are chosen and developed, ttieir 
effect and the media response) 

Nevus Media Studies (18 credit hours) 

• COMM-508 The Media and Government (3) 

• COMM-535 Special Topics in News Media (3) 

• COMM-546 Foreign Policy and the ftess (3) 

• OOMM-545Businessand Economic Joumaliam (3) 

• COMM-599 Media, Techndogy and Society (3) 

• OOMM-720 Seninar in Journalism (3) (with a grade of B 
or better) 

Weekend Graduate Program in Communication: 
Journalism and Public Affairs 

The weekend M.A. program in journalism and public afSirs 
is for professionals whose schedules make Saturday classes a 
preferable alternative to full4rme study. Acbiission require- 
ments are the same as forthe fiill-titiK program and for &e fall 



202 School of Communication 



sanestff only. Students are expected to conplete the {HDgiam 
within a twenty -month period. 

Combined Bachelor's Degree and M.A. in 
Communication: Public Communication 

This {MDgram enables highly qualified students to earn in 
five years of full-time study boA aB. A. or B.S. in any discipline 
and an M.A. in Ccmmunication: Public Comnunicaticn. 
Admission to the Program 

Admission to the combined program lequirBS second se- 
mester junior or senior standing, a cumilative grade point aver- 
age of 3.5, a formal application, two written faculty 
recommend^ons, a statement of purpose, and a positive review 
by the Sculty admissions conmittee. The Qiaduate Record Ex- 
amination (GRE) is not required unless apjdying for School of 
Connrunication Merit Awaids. 
Requirements 

• All requirements for a bachelor's degree in the student's 
major at American Ltaiva^ty 

Undergraduate students may apply 6 credit hours o f approved 
500-level course work to satisfy the requirements for both 



• AU lequiiements for tiie M.A in Comrmnication Public 
Communication, induding a mininimi of 24 credit hcurs 
coirq)leted in residence in graduate status after the 
undergraduate degree has been awanled. 

M.A. in Communication: 

Public Communication 

Admisaon ta the Proj^m 

Apphcants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study. Admission to ttie program requires a bache- 
lor's degree fitim an accredited college or university with at 
least a 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) grade point average in last 60 hours 
of unda-graduate couise work. Intemational students whose 
fiist language is not Enghsh should take the TOEFL examina- 
tion to demonstrate proficiency in written as weU as spoken 
Rngli.sh AU applicants must earn a satisfactory score on the 
Graduate Record Examination (OlE) Genaal (verbal, quanti- 
tative, and analytical). 

Previous academic or professional woik in public comrm- 
nication is not required, but all applicants inist demonstrate a 
serious comnitment to a career in this field. The ability to speak 
and write Enghsh weU is essential. OfiBcial transcripts, two let- 
ters of recommendation, and a l,000-\M)rd essay on the apph- 
cant's comnitment to pursuing graduate study in the program 
are submitted with fte aj^hcation. Interviews are not tequiied, 
but may be reconmended by the school. 

Admisaon is open to both fiill-time and part-timB students 
for file fell sranester. Full-time students are generally expected 
to coindete the program in ten montiis. Part-time students are 
expected to take a mininaim of tvw courses each semester and 
conplete thdr programin two years. The programis also avail- 



able in a weekend format which takes twenty months to 
conplete (see below). 

Qualified undergraduate students may apply to a combined 
bachelor's/M.A. program and use i^ to 6 credit hours of 
500-lev«l courses to satisfy the requirements of both degrees. 

Degree Requiremen ts 

• 30 aedit hours of approved graduate work 

• A graduate {TOJect with a gradeofBorbelterisrequiredofall 
students. This project, which fiilfills the university research 
requiremait, is in Ueu of a thesis. 

The project work must be focused in a particular 
communication area, such as: arts coxisnunication; 
government and political communication; international 
public relations; pubhc interest comminication; or corporate 
public relations (elective options in buaness administration 
are limited). The project should be selected to provide an 
iropcrtant credential for future employment as well as a focus 
for learning. It should reflect the studert's career direction 
within the broad field of public corrmunicatioii 

• A grade point average of 3.00 maintained during all work 
toward the degree 

• Comprehensive exanination inpuUic cotnmuncatian 
Course Requirements 

• COMM-640Princiiies of Strategic Coniimnication (3) 

• COMM-642 Pubhc Comminication Management (3) 

• COMM-644 Pubhc Comrmnication Writing (3) 

• COMM-646 Pi4)Uc Comrmnication Practicum (3) 

• COMM-735 Comminication Theory (3) (with a grade ofB 
or better) 

• COMM-738 Researdi Methods in Comminication (3) 
(with a grade of B orbettra") 

• COMM-744 Pubhc Comminication Seminar (3)(wifli a 
grade of B or better) 

• 9 credit hours in elective courses: 

Studentsnsy take an internship as oik of ftie elective courses. 
Other elective courses may be taken in comminication or in 
other fields such as sodology, business, pertbrming arts, 
education, government, justice, intemational service, 
{psychology, anthropology, art history, hteratine, ecooonics, 
or statistics. 

Weekend Graduate Program in 

Communication: Public Communication 

Wth its en^:ihasis on pubhc relations, this program, con- 
ducted on Saturdays, is for experiaiced professiorBls wto wish 
to enhance ttieir skills in conducting and nsnaging strategic 
communication campaigns, yet flieir schedules won't allow a 
full-time or even a part-time graduate program during the week. 
Admission lequiiements are the same as for the fiill-tinK jro- 
gram with the additional prerequisite of at least fiiree years of 
work experience, and the program starts in the fall semester 



School of ConnninicatiDn 203 



only. Students are expected to conplete the progiam vii&m a 
twenty-nxjnth period. 

M.A. in Communication: Producing 

for Film and Video 

Admission to the Ptvgram 

This wedvend graduate paDgram is designed for working 
adults who want to pursue careers in producing for film, video, 
television, and multimedia. Student cohort groups follow a 
planned curriculum, taking one course every seven weeks (two 
couises each semester) on Saturdays for a total of 10 courses. 
The 30-credit hour program is completed in 21 months. Previ- 
ous academic or professional experience in film or video is nrt 
required, but all applicants must demonstrate a serious cccnnnt- 
meid to a career in feis field. 

Applicants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study. Admission to the program requires a badie- 
lor'sdegree fixmanacaeditedcollegs orxniveisity with atleasta 
3 .00 (on a 4.00 scale) grade point average in last 60 hours of un- 
der^^dude course work. International students whose fiist lan- 
guage is not Engli^ shouU take flie TOEFL examin£*ion to 
denimstrate proficiency in written as well as spoken Rnglish 

OflBcial transcripts, two letters of recortmendation, and a 
1 ,000-wcHd essay on the applicant's conmitment to pursuing 
graduate study in the program are submitted with the applica- 
tion. The application deadline is April 1 . 
Degree Reqiuremoits 

• 30 credit hours of approved graduate wotk 

• Contimous enroDmeil 

• A grade point average of 3.00 maintained during all woik 
toward the degree 

• Com|Hehensive examinatiai in {loducing film and video 
Course Requremcnts 

• COMM-503 Broadcast Operations and ManagenBnt (3) 

• OOMM-5 1 3 Producing Film and Video (3) 

• COMM-550 Financing and Maitetinglndqwndent 

Productions (3) 

• CDMM-571 Production Planning and Management (3) 

• CX)MM-601 Legal Aspects of Comnwnication (3) 

• COMM-671 The Media Enterprise L EstaHishing ttie 

Enteiirise (3) (with a grade of B or better) 

• 03MM-672 The Media Enterprise H: Managing the 

Entetpise (3) (with a grade of B or better) 

• COMM-682 Writing for Visual Media (3) 

• 6 CTedit hoirs from COMM-570 Sumner Film and Digital 
Media Institute 

M.A. in Film and Video 

Admission to the nt>gram 

Applicants must meet the minimum university requirements 
for graduate study. AdmissicHi to the progam requires a badie- 
k>r'sdegiee frcm anaccredited college oriniveisity with atleasta 



3 00 (on a 4.00 scale) grade point average in last 60 hours of 
undo'graduate course woik. hitonatimal ^udei<s whose fist lan- 
guage is not English ^ould take the TOEFL examiniion to dem- 
onstrate proficiency in written as weO as ^x)ken E n^ish . 

Appiicaiis must earn a satisfactory score on the Gradiate 
Record Examinatioo (GRE) General (verbal, qualitative, and 
analytical). Previous exposure to film study, film and video pro- 
duction, or script writing is not required, although all appiicanls 
are required to diow evidence of professional commitinent and 
career direction related to their program of study. 

OfiBcial transcripts, two letteis of recommendafion, and a 
1 ,0(X)-word essay on the applicant's conmitment to pursuing 
graciiate studyin the program are submitted with the ^^pUcation. 

Adirission is not limited to full-time students, however stu- 
dents must be availsble to take most of their course woik during 
the day. Students will normally be expected to conplete the 
33-credit hour program within 24 months. 
De^^ee Requirements 

• 36 credit hours of approved graduate work 
Non-thesis option; 

COMM-70 1 Graduate Seminar ki Film Theory and 

ftactioe wife a grade of B or better 
COMM-702 Master's Portfolio Seminar with a grade of B 

or better 

• A grade point average of 3.00 maintadned during all woik 
toward the degree 

• Comprehensive examination in film and video 
Course Requkements 

• COMM-513ProducingFilmandVideo(3) 

• COMM-63IFilmandVideo Production I (3) 

• COMM-634 Film and Video Production H (3 ) 

• (X)MM-682 Writing for Visual Media (3) 

• COMM-701 Graduate Seminar in Film Theory and 
Practice (3) with a grade of B or better (taken in the fiist 
year) 

• COMM-702 Master's Portfolio Seminar (3) with a grade of 
B or better 

• IScredithoursincouraessefectedfixMnthefollowingareas: 
Fihnproduction or video production; film theory, history, and 
aiticism; miltimedia; and script writing Students may 
arphasize one of fliese areas in flie design of tiidr program, 
but the program mist include conses fit)m all of these areas. 
Courses in related areas such as performing arts and 
photograjiiy may also be included. 

M.F.A. in Fihn and Electronic Media 

Admisskn to the Rvgiram 

Appiicantsmust meet the rtrinimimunivasity requirements 
for graduate study. Admission to the programrequires a bache- 
lor's degree fiom an accreditBd college or miversity with st 
least a 3 .00 (on a 4.00 scale) grade point average in last 60 hours 
of undei^graduate course woik. Iitemational students whose 



204 School of Communication 



fiist language is not English should take the TOBFL examina- 
tion to demonstrate proficiaicy in written as \^eU as spoken 
English. The Graduate Record General Examination (GRE) is 
required, but may be waived by the division director. 

An undergraduate degree in one of the visual media is desir- 
aHe, but appbcalions from candidates who have mqored in 
ofeer fields will also be considered Applicants with prior ejqie- 
rience in the visual media should submit a portfolio illustrating 
relevant professional experience. Students without prior experi- 
ence in film, video, photography, or digital media production or 
vAx) do not demonstrate fluough flieir portfoho a level of mini- 
roun proficiency in media production will need to reconcile 
their deficiencies with additional course woik. 

OflBcial transcripts, two letters of recommendation, and a 
1,000-word essay on the applicant's commitment to pursuing 
graduate study in fee program are submitted with the application. 
Degree Requirements 

• 51 credit hours of approved graduate woik 

Students without a raininiim level of poficieocy in media 
producticn are required to take COMM-630 Principles of 
Photography prior to or at the beginning of ftieir prograra 
This comse does not count toward the 51 credit hours 
required fijr the degree. 

• Production ofa portfoho oforiginal creative work inthe areas 
of soiptwritinfe film, or electronic media production under 
the supervision of a faculty committee and in conjunction 
withCOMM-702 Master Is Portfolio Seminar, with agradeof 
B or better 

• A grade point average of 3.00 maintained during all work 
toward the degree 

• Comprehensive examination in film and electronic media 
Course Requirements (51 credit hours) 

Core (27 credit hours) 

• COMM-513ProdudngFihnandVideo(3) 

• COMM-63 1 Fihn and Video Ptoduction I (3) 

• COMM-634 Fihn and Video Piwductionll (3) or 
COMM-584 Film Technology and Practice (6)* 

• COMM-650 Digital hnaging (3) 

• COMM-682 Writing for Visual Media (3) 

or 
COMM-587 Soeenwriting (3)* 

• COMM-701 Graduate Seminar in Film Theory and 

Practice (3) (nust be taken in ttie first year) 

• COMM-711 Teaching Seminar in Media Arts (3) 

With the advisor's approval, students with con^jarable prior ex- 
perience or course work may substitute other couses in produc- 
tion and writing or media studies. 

• Twoofthe foDowing: 

COMM-51 1 History of Documentaty (3) 
COMM-517 Hstory of CrosfrCultural CinenH (3) 
COMM-520 Mstory of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 Hstory of Photography (3) 



COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
Portfolio Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• COMM-702 Master's Portfoho Seminar (6) with a ^ade of 
B or better 
Efectives (18 credit hours) 

With the guidance of their advisor, students may develop an 
area of concentration or expatise using courses from the 
following, COMM-690 Independent Study Project, 
COMM-691 Graduate Internship, and COMM-692 
Cooperative Education Field Experience may also be used 
with permission of the student's advisor. 

Production and Writing (minimum 6 credit hours) 
COMM-561 Advanced Voting for Fihn (3) 
COMM-562 AdvaiKed Writing for Television (3) 
COMM-565 Advanced Visual Media Portfoho (3) 
COMM-570 Summer Fihnand Digital Media hstitute (1 -6) 
COMM-635 Introduction to Studio Television (3) 
COMM-638 Production Ptacticum (1-3) 
COMM-652 Wfeb Studio (3) 
COMM-654 Digital Post Production (3) 
COMM-656 Dramatic Production (3) 
COMM-664 Directing for Camera (3) 
COMM-686 Documentaiy Production (3) 

Media Studies and Producing (minimum 3 credit hours) 

(see note below) 
COMM-5H History of Documentaiy (3) 
COMM-51 4 Censorehip in the Media (3) 
COMM-51 5 Media, Children, and Society (3) 
COMM-51 6 Topics in Film aai Media Arts (3) 
COMM-51 7 Mstory of CrossOiltural Cinema (3) 
COMM-520 Mstory of Animation (3) 
COMM-527 MstoryofHiotography(3) 
COMM-550 Financing and Mariceting Independent 

Productions (3) 
COMM-558 Survey of American Cinema (3) 
COMM-584 Fihn Technology and Practice (3)* 
COMM-585 Directing (3)* 
COMM-586 Mstory of Czech Cinema (3)* 
COMM-601 Legal Aspe<isofCon¥nunication(3) 
^fote■ One media studies elective nay be taken in a related 
subject area with the approval of the (acuity advisor Related 
media studies courses indude fee following: 
COMM-503 Etoadcast Operations and Management (3) 
LIT-646 Topics in Film 

PERF-557 Creative Writers' Performance Laboratoiy (3) 
PERF-665 Theatre Mstoiy I (3) 
PERF-666TheatiB Mstory n (3) 
PERF-667 Theatiie Hstoiy m (3) 

* Courses offeied in Prague, Czech Republic Students may 
enroll in fee film and theatre curriculum at fee Prague Fihn 
Academy (FAMU) through the AU Abroad program. 
Courses taken it FAMU receive full wedit toward flie M JA 
in Film and Electronic Media. 



School of International 
Service 

• Administration and Faculty 

• Undergraduate Programs 

• Graduate Programs 



Dean Louis W Gcwdman 
Associate Deal Maria Green Oowles 
Associate Detn for Pro^mm Devebpmcnt 

and Graduate Admisions Leeaime Duosmoie 
Assistant Dean for Budget and AdminlstratioD 
Josqih Clqjpa- 

Academic Afiairs Ofiktr \Wl]iamBaka- 
Graduate AdnHssions and Financial Aid Nicole Canpbell 
Graduate Academic Afibirs Maiy Barton, Rebecca Bellinger, 
Mariey CYutcher, James Gilbert 
Undergraduate Acadendc Affairs Suzanne SkilUngs, 
Shawn HiUman, Erica Waxbom, Julie Wickham 
Comparative and Regional Studies Division 
Director Quan^eng Zhao 
International Communication Division 
Director Shalini VenturelK 
Into-natiDnal Development Division 
Director Ebvid HirschmaBn 
Intonational I^ace and Conffict 
Resolution Division 
Director Abdul Aziz Said 

International lV>litics and Foreign Pblicy Division 
Director Renee Mailin-Bennett 
JDjyiJL Program Director Paul WiUiams 
PhJX Program Director Stephen Silvia 
Fu3-Tbne FaaJiy 

Professor Emeritus/a W.C. Cromwell, R. W. Gregg, 
J. Goldstan, M Hannna; GL Harris, S. Maidin, A.D. Mott, 
W.C. Olson, FJ. Piotrow, D.D. Randall, M. Struelens, 
M.R WaBcer, LC. \Mlson 

IbnKhaldun Chair of Islamic Studies A. Ahmed 
Mohammed Said Farsi Chair of Islamic Peace A. A. Said 
C.W. Lim/Korea Foundation Chair in Korean Studies 
Jun^o Yoo 

Professor P. Brenner, R. Broad, R Cheru, D.L. Clarke, 
S.D. Cohen, R Fisher, L.W. Goodman, D. Hitschmann, 
L.L. Lubtano,R. Marlin-Bemiett, J. Miflehnan, K Mowdana, 
R. F^stoi; JJVI. Richardson, L. Shelley, G Weaver, Q. Ztoo 



Associate Professor Emeritus S.R Arnold, W. Kincade 
Associate Professor M. Abu-Nimer, D. Brautigam, C. Chin, 
M. Egan, C. Gallaher, T. Gutner, R Henning, P. Jackson, 
N.S. Levinson, C. Lusaae, J. Mertus, S. Murray, R. Persaud, 
V. Samarasin^e, C. Schneider, S. Silvia, S. VentweUi, 
P. Wapner, P. Williams 

Assistant Professor D. Bachner, T. Boudreau, J Calabrese, 
C. Call,M. Carter,D. Cl»ng,E Cohn, J. Domask,B. Ellis, 
J. Francis, D. Fuller, E. C3iared), PK. Heng, C. Housenick, 
P. Howard, R. Johnson, S. Johnson, A. Kadayifci, M. Kiaidy, 

C. Kyrou, C. Maisch, D. Masis, C. Rudolph, C. Rossiter, 

H. Schamis, S. Shepler, L. Skalli-Hanna,M. Smifli, M. Solis, 

D. Veiheyen, A. Wanis-St. Jdm, S. Weiner 
Distingmshed Dipbmat-in-Residence A. Quainton 
Scbolar-in-Residence R Ci4)itt, S. Landau, A. Porzecanski, 
J. Shapiro 

Instructor C, LeVan 

The School of International Service (SIS) offers profes- 
sional training in international affairs. The programs are based 
on a multidisciplinary curriculum oriented towards the liberal 
arts that raicourages students to explore international relations 
through the contributions of political scientists, sociologists, an- 
thropologists, economists, attorneys, historiais, and specialists 
in comnramicatioiL 

The school offers exceptional opportunities that evolve fkim 
university's location in a premier world capital and from the rich 
human and documaitary resources which enhance the sdiool's 
educational programs. At all times ttie links b^ween the school 
and its Washington environment nourish tiie academic and px)- 
fessional growth of its studei4s. Whatever their career objec- 
tives, students participate in programs that are irultidisciplinary, 
problem and pohcy oriented, and uniquely adapted to those op- 
p>ortunities inherent in the metropolitan Washington locstioiL 

In addition, SIS has a number of thematic straigttis includ- 
ing demoCTatization, globalization, international poUtical econ- 
omy, and human rights. To team more aboid the distinctive 
faculty and student research in these and other areas, goto; 
www.americaaedu/sis 



205 



206 School of Intematioiial Service 

Faculty 

The divetsity of the full-time faculty members of flie School 
of International Service in terms of academic disciplines and 
professional experience, bolh in ttie Lhited States and abroad, 
exemplifies the niJtidisciplinary and cross-cultural aspects of 
international relations. Bringing cutting-edge research into their 
classrooms, the faculty use a variety of interactive approaches 
such as siimlations and case studies in their teaching. The 
school regularly appoints adjunct and visiting professors and 
benefits fixwn their expertise in the field of international rela- 
tions. As a center of pubUc dialogue, &e school brings leading 
experts fit)m around the woild to address emei^ging issues in in- 
tematiooal affairs. 
Divisions 

The School of International Service indudes five divisions; 
Comparative and Regional Studies, Ictemational Politics and 
Foreign Policy, International Communication, Intematimal 
Development, and Intematicnal Peace and Cbnflict Resolution. 

The Division of Con^Hrative and Regional Studies (CRS) 
provides unique opportunities forthe study ofthemajorregiDns 
of the world Africa, the ArrBricas, Asia, Europe, the Middle 
East, and Russia and Central Eurasia The CRS curriculum 
builds i^n the in-deptti coverage of these regions by stresang 
that issues aie best understood in comparative perspective. 

The International Communication (IC) Division is the old- 
est sudi program in the United St^es. It focuses on international 
communicmtion policy and techncJogy as well as cross-cultural 
communication. 

The International Development (ID) Division indudes two 
mihidisciplinary degrees which combine international devel- 
opment thecffy and practice with the goal o f inproving opportu- 
nities for the poor and vulnerable, f>articularly in developing 
nations. Its emphases include devdopment management, policy 
analysis, and development education. 

The International Peace and Conflict Resolution (IPCR) Di- 
vision critically analyzes theories of the causes of war and oiga- 
nized violence at the institutional and international levels; 
examines alternative theories and approaches and provides ap- 
plied skills fijT resolving and preventing organized violence and 
war, as well as contending ^)proaches to peace making, build- 
ing cooperative global relationshps, and international negotia- 
tion; and analyzes current confhct situations and develops 
poUcy proposals fir their resolution. 

The Division of International Pohtics and Foreign Policy 
(IPFP) includes the areas of international law and organizatjon, 
iiieraational political economy, global secuity, United States 
foreign poUcy, global environmaital poUcy, and intemational 
economic rdations. Students ground their work in appropriate 
theory and economics courses. Waridng wifli faculty advisors, 
they design tailored course concentrations. 
Centers 

American Consortiuin on European Union Studies The 
European Cominission has desi^ated the School of Intema- 
tional Service as a partner in the American Consortium on Eu- 
ropean IMon Studies (ACES). ACES is a locus for teaching. 



researdi, and policy making related to European studies. Amer- 
ican University's Europe Coundl, composed of faculty from 
across &e univeraty, supports research and learning in Europe. 
For more inlbrmation, go to: www.american.edu/ace3 

Center for Asian Studies For over twerty years the Center 
for Asian Studies has provided a locus for teaching, research, 
and exchange programs involving Asia. The center holds sev- 
eral mq'or annual woiicshops and conferences; one such confer- 
ence focuses on joint research projects with miveisities in 
China, Japan, and Korea and is held in each courtry on a rotat- 
ing baas. The center has also developed distinctive dual degree 
and exchange programs with Asian coimtries. For more infor- 
mation, go to: 
www.american.edu/sis'center for asian studied' 

Center for Global Peace The Center for Global Peace pro- 
vides a framewoik for programs and initiatives that advance the 
study and understanding of world peace, grounded in a search 
for a just and sustainable world older By seddngto understand 
better the social, political, cultural, econonic, and civic stnic- 
tures w^ose deterioration can lead to violence and social up- 
heaval, the center contributes to the ideitific^on of and support 
for measures to restore and aihance peace. Center activities fo- 
cus on the interdependent global system, identifying common 
interests, and woiking toward canmon security. For more in- 
formation, go to: 
www.american.edu/academic.depts/acainst^cep/ 

Transnational Crime and Corruption Center The grow- 
ing phenomena of transnational crime and corruption present a 
formidable challenge to the protection of national and interna- 
tional security, economic development, democratic reform, and 
human rights. Systemic comfition in one country often contrib- 
utes to oime and terror at the global level, and thus is a problem 
that must be &ced by ttie international community. The Trans- 
national Crime and Ccnruption Cmter (IraCCC) is the first cen- 
ter in the United States devoted to teaching research, training 
and formulating pohcy advice in transnational crime, conuption 
and terrorism TiaCCC's fundamental goal is to understand the 
causes and scope of transnational crinK and comption and to 
propose well-grounded policy to reduce and eliminate these 
problems. For more information, go to: 
www.american.edu/academic.depts/acainst/transcrime/ 

Ewhange I¥ograms 

AU-Ritsumeikan Exchange American University and 
Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto, Japan offer a dual master's 
degree program. This program selects a limited mnnber of stu- 
dents with both EngUsfa and Japanese language profidency to 
ccxiplete a 46-credit hour dual master's degree program in in- 
tonational af&irs within a two-year period. Student cohorts be- 
gin their studies at American University's School of 
Intemational Service and complete their second yearofstiidyat 



School of Inteniatioiial Service 207 



Ritsumeikan I Jniversrity Graduate School of International Rela- 
tions. A oross-cultural, global perspective is integral to the cur- 
riculum. Graduates of the program receive master's degrees 
Iromboth American University and Ritsumeikan IJniveisity. 

AU-Korea University EiKhange Students spend one year 
at American Uni veisity and complete their second jcar of study 
at Korea University's Graduate School of International Rela- 
tions. Classes aie available in l^gli^ and/or Korean. Graduates 
of the program receive master's degrees from both American 
University and Korea University. 

AU-Sookmyung Women's Univo^sity Exchange Ameri- 
can University's School of International Service and 
Sookrayung ^M)men's University's Graduate School of Interna- 
tional Relations in Seoul, Korea, offer a dual degree program 
for students to simultaneously eam master 's degrees from both 
school s within two yeais. Students enroll in regular course woik 
at Sookn^ng Women's University in their second year. At the 
conclusion of their course wodc, students may remain in Korea 
forfcree monttis to finidi their internships Classes are available 
in both English £ind Korean and the program is open to both fe- 
male and male AU studoits. 

AU-Sciences Po Exchange The American Univer- 
sity-Sciences Pb exchange program in Paris, ftanoe offo^ stu- 
dents the opportunity to study and conduct fieki research at one 
of the world's leadrt^ institutions, L'Insitut D'Etudes PoKtiques 
de ftris. With their advisors, SIS students may design a pro- 
gram of study that fiilfills requirements in their degree program 
in any of the SIS fields. An intermediate level of French is re- 
quired, and students may participate for one or two semesters. 
Special Opportunities 

Numerous school-wide qiecial programs are available for 
undergraduate and graduate studeitfs. These include study and 
internship opportunities around the worid and in the interna- 
tional capital dty of Wadiington, D.C., including the US. De- 
partment of State. These opportxniities help SIS students link 
theory and practice actively and bmld skills that are critical in an 
increasingly gbbal world Students write for SIS pubhcations, 
including JTte Diplomatic Pouch, the SIS grackiate journal 
Swords & Ploughshares, and Demokratizatsiya, and participate 
in school and university govanance, enhandng both service 
and leadership potoitiaL Through tiie SIS Research Sympo- 
sium or working on a puMication with peers cr professors, SIS 
students at all levels are involved in cutting-edge scfaolaily and 
pohcy-oiiented research. A limited nun4)er of graduate fellow- 
ships and assistant^ps are awarded on the basis of merit as 
well as school and program needs. 

The GrifiSth Lecture Series, organized by the SIS Graduate 
Student Council, brings visiting scholars and foreign policy 
practitioners to the school each year. The annual Warren 
Hunsberger Lectxire higbhghts a distinguished scholar of Asian 
studies. Regular forain international developanent, iitemational 
communication, international poUtics, and U. S. foreign pohcy 
attract experts from around the world and engage students in 
formal and infennal discussicms. The weekly Interrsitional De- 
velopment Forum invites noted schcdars, policy makers, and in- 



ternational development professionals to interact with students, 
faculty, and members of the Washington development commu- 
nity in discussions of current issues in the interoatiorial develop- 
ment field 

The school also qmnsors numerous co-curricular opportuni- 
ties including the amual SIS student-faculty Softball game and 
the student-faculty-alumnj autumn hike. Career-oriented work- 
shops greatly enhance opportunities for successful learning and 
networking. 
Educational Resources in Washington, D.C 

Only in Washington can the subject of intemationd affms 
be studied in such a relevant context. This location afibids op- 
portunities for hands-on learning with academic credit throu^ 
internships in gpvemmeii and private sectors with international 
interests. Internships are available with international org9niza- 
tions, congressional committees, lobbying groups, research or- 
ganizations, and government offices of special professional 
interest to students. 

Qualified unda-graduate and graduate students have the op- 
portunity to enroll in courses at any of the institutions in the 
Consortium of Universities of the Wadungton Metropohtan 
Area. By taking advantage of corBortinn offerings, students 
may greatly enrich their programs, particulaily in specialized 
interest areas and language study Washington, D.C. offers 
unique research facilities inclixling the Library of Congress, the 
National Archives, and various other libraries maintained by 
govenmient agencies, pubUc and private international organiza- 
tions, associations, and other area universities 

As a menijer of the Inter-University Consortium fiir Politi- 
cal and Social Research (ICPSR), American LMversity has 
ready access to hurxlreds of data sets. The univeraty operates 
the Social Sciaice Computer Laboratory which provides stu- 
dents access to comnnnlyused applications and to flje Internet 
Study Abroad 

AU Abroad offers the of^rtunity for students to study 
abroad and gain firll American University course credit. All stu- 
dents are encouraged to kam and work in another culture. AU 
Abroad enclave prograns, many of which include intransh^ 
opportunities, are offered in Beijing, Berlin, Brussels, Ifevana, 
London, Madrid, Nairobi, Paris, Prague, Rorre, and Santiago. 
In addition, throu^ the AU Abroad Partner program students 
may spend a semester or year at {westigious universities across 
the globe, including Canada, Mexico, England, Scotland, Ire- 
land, France, Ftolarxl, Netherlands, Argentina, Austraha, New 
Zealand, Korea, Israel, Egypt, Lebanon, and Sharjah, UA.E 
Intonational study tours led by faculty menters are offered 
during sanestQ' breaks and summer sessions. For more infor- 
mation on AU Abroad programs, call 202-885-1320 or 
866-313-0757, 

e-nBJl auabroad@american.edu or go to; 
www.auabroad.amgican.edu/ . 

Career and Rvfesaonal Opportunities 

The school has had great success prep>aring students for ca- 
reers in the public, private, andnot-lbr-firofit sectors. Graduates 



208 Sdiool of International Service 



have establi^ed flouridiing careers in fields including foreign 
service, economic development, intelligence ga&ering and as- 
sessment, disaster relief policy analysis, cangressioiial aflairs, 
and tedinology transfer. Graduates accept positions in Wash- 
ington and ebewhere with agencies concemed wifti health, food 
resources, population, security, arms control, diplomacy, and 
iriemational trade and banking. SIS alumni also serve in the in- 
tematioQal branches of organizations involved in law, agricul- 
ture, science, religion, culture, printing and publishing, 
joumaUsm, management, accounting, and higher education. 
The wide range of government activities in Washington, D.C., 
including the Foreign Service, the Armed Forces, and Congress 
create unique opportunities for career development. 

Undergraduate Study 

SIS offers the B.A. in International Studies or the B. A. in 
Language and Area Studies with the following majors; 
French/Europe, German/Europe, Spamsh/Latin America, and 
Russian'Area Studies. 

The BA. in International Studies begins with foundation 
courses in woiid politics, cross cultural conxnunicatioo. West- 
em traditions, non- Western area studies, U.S. politics, and eco- 
nomics Students take foreign language, research methods, and 
core field courses selected fiom international development, in- 
ternational economic relatirais, international peace and conflict 
resolution, ^obal enviiDnmaital politics, and U.S. fordgn pol- 
icy. Building on the foundation and core courses, students select 
an area specialization (Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, the 
Middle East, or Russia and Central Eurasia) and a fimctiaoal 
field of concentration (business, cotiq>arative and intanational 
race relations, global environmental politics, international com- 
msiicetion, international development, international economic 
relations, international politics, Idamic studies, peace and con- 
flict resolution, or U.S. foreign policy). The program capstone is 
the integrative senior s^ninar. 

The B.A in Language and Area Studiesprogram, jointly de- 
signed and administered by the College of Arts and Sciences 
(CAS) and the Sdiool of International Service (SIS), respcmds 
to the national need for foreign language skills in the global vil- 
lage for effective conmunication and improved international 
understanding. This degree program provides a foundation in 
language and culture courses oortplemented by area-related so- 
cial sciaice courses. There is also a variety of course offerings 



with an international focus offered by other departments includ- 
ing anthropology, business, oomrtunication, economics, educa- 
tion, government, history, language, philosopfay , and sociology. 

Honor Society The International Relations Honor Society, 
A^)ha Chapter of Sigma Iota Rho, was founded at AirKrican 
University on April 12, 1984. Si^na bta Rho is an interdisci- 
plinary scholarly recognition sodety founded for undergradu- 
ates whose coiuse of study concentrates on intemational 
relations. 
Graduate Study 

The school's graduate programs are grounded in the social 
sciences and reflect a strong commitment by the school's 6c- 
ulty to teaching and research. Students are encouraged to pres- 
ent conference papers, engage in collaborative work with 
facility menijers, and submit articles to re feieed journals." 

The School of Intemational Service offers an MA. in Inter- 
national Affairs, MA. in Intemational Comrmnication,M.A in 
Intemational Dewlopment, M.A in Intemational Peace and 
Conflict Resolution, M.A. in Global Environmental Policy, 
MA. in Ethics, Fteace, and Global Affairs, M.S. in Develop 
ment Management, the Master of Intanational Service, and a 
PhX). in Intanational Relations. 

There are dual degree programs combining the M. A in In- 
tanational Afiairs with a J.D.; M.A. in Intemational Peace and 
Conflict Resolution with a Master of Theological Studies or the 
Master of Arts in Teaching, or M.A. in Intemational 
Development with a Master of Theological Studies. Graduate 
studente are encouraged to take advantage of the university's 
dual degree option and earn two master's degrees simulta- 
neously 
Co-tificate Programs 

SIS offers undergraduate certificates in Intemational Afi&irs 
and European Studies. Graduate -level credit certificates include 
The Americas, Cross-Cultural Communication, European 
Studies, Intemational Economic PoUcy, tod Peacebuilding. 
Graduate Professional Development Certificates are available 
in Cortparative and Regional Studies, Global Environmental 
Policy, Intemational Commmication, Intemational Develop- 
ment, intemational Economic Policy, Intematioisil Peace and 
Conflict Reaalution, Uemational Politics, and United Stetes 
Foreign Policy. 



School of International Service 209 



Undergraduate Programs 



B A in International Studies 

B A in Language and Area Studies 

French/Europe, GermanCurope, 

Spanish/I atin America, or RussiaiV'Area Studies 

B.A. in International Studies 

Admission to the n^gram 

Candidates for adnissioo to the sdiool must present evi- 
dence ofexceQent persoial and academic qualifications. To be 
considered for freshman admission, an apphcant ^ould have 
earned at least a B average in secondary school Cultural fectore 
are considered in evaluating transcript and examiadion results. 
Other factors taken into accoint are leadershp quahties, char- 
acter, and personal interest. Students from other region- 
ally-accredited collegiate institutions, and students in other 
programs at American University who have corrpleted the 
freshman year, should maintain a cumulative grade point aver- 
age of 3.00 (on a 4.00 scale) to be considered fi)r transfer to the 
school. 
Umversity Requirements 

• Atotal of 120 credit hours 

• 6CTedit hours of college writing 

• 3 credit hours of college mMhematics or the equivalent 
by examination 

G«ner al Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouises, consisting ofonefoundationcouree and 
one second-level course in an approved sequence from eadi 
of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours may be taken in the same 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 64 credit hours {dus 3^1 6 credit hours in foreign language 
course work, with grades ofC or better 

L^ to 18 of these credit houis may also count towaid 
fiilfillment of General Education requirements. 
Students may, wtere appropriate and with SIS approval, 
select special topics courses to fiilfill lequirements. Students 
may apply up to 3 credit hours toward the mqor fiom an 
approved internship or cooperative education field 
experience. Study abroad course credits may be used toward 
the m^or with the approval of SIS. 
Foundation Courses (28crecMt hours) 

• SIS-101 Leadership Gateway (1) 

• BCON-100/ECON-100GMacroecon«mcs4;l(3) 

• BCON-200/ECON-200G Microeconomics 4:2 (3) 

• One course in U.S. polilics from the Mowing: 
GOVT-llO/GOVT-llOGPohticsin the 

United States 4: 1(3^) 



CjOVT-I 20 Introduction to American Politics (3^) 
GOVT-210<GOVT-210O Political Povwr and American 

PubhcPoUcy4:2(3) 
GOVT-2 1 5/GOVT-2 1 5G Civil Rights and 

Liberties 4:2 (3) 

• SIS-105/SIS-105O World ft)litics 3:1 (3) 

• SIS-140/SIS-140G Cross-Cultural Communication 3:1 (3) 

• Two courses focusing on ^^festem traditions (6 oedit hours) 
from the following: 

ANTH-235G Eariy America: The Buried ftst 2:2 (3) 
ARTH-IOO/ARTH-IOOG European Ait From Cave to 

Catiiedral2:l (3) 
ARTH-205/ARTH-205G Ait of to Reiaissance 22 (3) 
OOMM-270G How &e News Media aape History 22 (3) 
GOVT-105/GOVT-105G hidividual Freedom 

vs. Authority 2:1 (3) 
QOVT-303 Ancient Political Thought (3) 
GOVT-305 Modem PoUtical Thought (3) 
HIST-IOOG Historians and fee living Past 2: 1 (3) 
HIST-llO/HIST-llOG Renaissance and Revolutions: 

Europe, 1400 1815 2:1(3) 
HIST-115GWoik and Community 2:1 (3) 
HIST-202 The Ancient Worid: Greece (3) 
HIST-203 The Ancient Worid: Rome (3) 
HIST-204 Medieval Europe (3) 
HIST-2D5/H1ST-205G American Encounters: 

1492-1865 2:2(3) 
HIST-21 5/HIST-21 5G Social Forces feat Shaped 

America 2:2 (3) 
HIST-235/HIST-235GThe West in Crisis: 

1900-19452:2(3) 
HIST-245 Modem Jewish aviU2ation (3) 
JLS-llO/JLS-llOG Western Legal Traditions 2:1 (3) 
JLS-225/JLS-225G American Legal Culture 2:2 (3) 
JWST-205/JWST-205G AiKient and Medieval Jewish 

Civih2ation2:2(3) 
JWST-210G Voices ofModem Jewish Literature 2:2 (3) 
LTT-l 25G Great Books That Shaped the Western Wn-ki 21 (3) 
LJT-235G Afiicfn American Literature 2:2 (3) 
Lrr-240G Asian American Literature 2:2 (3) 
LJT-265/LIT-265G Literature and Sodety in Victorian 

England 2:2 (3) 
LFS-230G The Mademist Explosion: Culture and Ideology 

in Europe 2:2 (3) 
IHIL-105/FHIL-105G Western Phitoaophy 2:1 (3) 
FHIL-220/FHIL-220G Moral Phflosophy 22 (3) 
miL-221 Philosophy, Polilics, and Society (3) 
HIIL-235G Theories ofDemocracy andHunBn Ri^ts 22 (3) 
FHIL-300 Ancient and Medieval Philosoi^y (3) 
rHIL-301 Modem Philosophy fiom Bacon to Hegel (3) 
FHIL-302 Mneteenfe Century PhilosoFiiy (3) 



210 Sdiool of Intemational Service 



PHI1^303 Twaitieth Certury Philosophy (3) 

PHYS-230G Changing Views of the Universe 2:2 (3) 

RELG-lOS/RELG-lOSGThe Religious Heritage ofthe 
West 2: 1(3) 

RELjO-220G Religious Thought 2:2 (3) 

SOCY-215/SOCY-215GThe Rise of Critical Social 
Thou^t 22 (3) 

WGST-l 50AVaST-l 50G Women's Voices through 
Time 2: 1(3) 
• Two couises in non- Western area studies (6 credit hours), 

with one course fixoneachof two differetl areas. See also the 

list of approved courses in the SIS Lhdeigraduate Advising 

Office. 
Africa 

LFI-l 50/Lrr-l 50G Third World Literature 3 : 1 (3) 

REIjG-210/RELG-210GNon-Westem Religious 
Traditions 3:2 (3) 

SIS-250/SIS-250G avili2ations of Africa 3:2 (3) 

SIS-265 Contenporary Africa (3) 
The Americas 

HIST-241 Colonial Latin America (3) 

HIST-242 Latin America since Independence (3) 

LFS-21 0yLFS-210G Latin America: History, Art, 
Literature 3: 2 (3) 

SIS -276 Contemporary Latin America (3) 
Asia 

HIST-25(VHIST-250G Civilization and Modernization: Asia 
3:2(3) 

REIjG-185/RELG-185G Forms offiie Sacred: Religionsof 
the East 3:1 (3) 

REljG-210/RELG-210GNon-Westan Religious 
Traditions 3:2 (3) 

SIS-161 Qvilizations of Asia (3) 

SIS-255/SIS-255G China, Japan and United States 3:2 (3) 
Middle East 

HIST-343 History of Israel (3) 

RELG-370 Islam (3) 

SIS-245/SIS-245G The World of Islam 3:2 (3) 

SIS-264 Contemporary Middle East (3) 

SOCY-225/SOCY-225G Conteirporary Arab \\brld 3:2 (3) 
Rt4ssia and Central Eurasia 

HIST-225/HIST-2250 Russia: Past and Riesent 3:2 (3) 

HIST-230 Early Russian History, 988-1 700 (3) 

HIST-231 Impaial Russia, 1700-1917 (3) 

HIST-232 Twentieth Century Russia (3) 

SIS-258 Contenqwrary Russia (3) 
Core Field Courses (9 credit hours) 

• Three courses from the following fields. See the list of 
approved core field courses in the SIS Undergraduate 
Advising Office. 

Global Environmen tal Politics 

International Development 



International Economic Policy 
International Peace and Conflict Resolution 
United States Foreign Policy 
Research Methods (6-7 credit hours) 

• SIS-206 Irtroductionto Intemational Relations Research (3) 

• One course from the following: 

CSC-1 00 Conputere and hifonnation (3) 
STAr-202 Basic Statistics (4) 

other couise approved by SIS Ltadeigraduate Advising 
Office 
Foreign Language (3-16 credit hours) 

• 3-1 6credit hours in one modemfbiagnlsnguage, depending 
on initial placement. Consult flie SIS Undergraduate Office 
for more information 

Area Specialization (9 cre<it hours) 

• Three courses in one ofthe following regional areas; Africa, 
the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Russia and 
Central Eurasia 

A minimum of two courses (6 oedit hours) must be taken in 
SIS and a minimum oftwo courses must be taken at the 300 
level or above. 
Africa 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
LIT-1 50/1 JF-l 50G Third World Literature 3 : 1 (3) 
RELG-210/RELG-210GNon-Westem Religious 

Traditions 3: 2 (3) 
SIS-250/SIS-250G Qvilizations of Africa 3:2 (3) 
SIS-265 Contenporary Africa (3) 
SIS-573 Intemational Relations of Africa I (3) 
SIS-574 Intemational Relationsof Africa!! (3) 
The Americas 
ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
HlST-241 Colonial Latin America (3) 
HIST-242 Latin America since Independence (3) 
HIST-340 Latin American Studies (3) 
LFS-21 0/LFS-210G Latin America: History, Art, 

Literature 3:2 (3) 
SIS-276 Contenporary Latin America (3) 
SIS-577 Intemational Relationsof the Americas (3) 
SPAN-357 Introduction to Latin American Literature (3) 
Asia 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
HIST-25(yHIST-250G Civilization and Modernization: Asia 

3:2(3) 
HIST-347 Asian Studies (3) (topics) 
REIjO-185/RELG-1850FornBofflje Staed: Religionsof 

theEast3:l(3) 
REIJO-210/RELG-210G Non-Western Religious 

Traditions 3: 2 (3) 
RELG-373Hinduism(3) 
SIS-161 avihzations of Asia (3) 
SIS-255/SIS-255G China, Japan and United Slates 3:2 (3) 



School of Intematiooal Service 21 1 



SIS-559 Selected Topics in Cross-National Studies (3) 

SIS-561 Modem China (3) 

SIS-567 International Relations of East Asia 1 (3) 

Europe 

FREN-324 Civilisation Franqaise I (3) 

FREN-325 Civilisation Fraru^ell^) 

FREN-326 French Topics (3) 

CERM-336 G«nnan Topics (3) 

GERM-438 German Qvilization 1 (3) 

(SRM-439 German avili2ation II (3) 

GOVT-334 Modem Qitish Politics (3) (study abroad) 

mST-llO/HIST-llOG Renaissance and Revolution; 
Europe,1400-1815 2:1(3) 

HIST-204 Medieval Europe (3) 

HIST-221 Histoiy of Britain I (3) 

HIST-222 History of aitainU (3) 

HIST-239 Modem Germany since 1848 (3) 

HIST-318 Nazi Germaiy (3) 

HIST-31 9 Holocaust (3) 

HIST-320 Wto aal Di^omacy : Napoleon to Bismarck P) 

HIST-326 European Society in ttie Nineteenfe and 
Twentieth Centuries (3) 

HIST-327 Twentieth Centuiy Europe (3) 

HIST-334 Victorian England (3) 

HIST-336 Mstoiy of Ireland (3) 

HIST-337 British Studies (3) (topics) 

SIS-331 An Overview of the European Union (3) 

SIS-347 Contenporary Gennany and Berlin (3) (study 

abroad) 
SIS-355 The Relations of \\festem European Nations (3) 
SlS-380 Brussels Senanar (4) (study alxoad) 
SIS-387 Madrid Seminar (4) (study abroad) 
SIS-530 Colloquium on the Common Market (3) 
SIS-551 Eccnorr^, Politics and Society in Europe (3) 
SIS-557 Foreign PoUcy Fonnulation in West European 
States (3) 
Middle East 

HIST-343 Histoiy of Israel (3) 

RELG-370Islam(3) 

SIS-245/SIS-245G The World of Islam 3:2 (3) 

SIS-264 Contemporary Middle East (3) 

SIS-364 Conterrpirary Islam and International RelaticRis(3) 

SIS-365 Arab-Isiaeli Relations (3) 

SlS-571 International Relations ofthe Middle East I (3) 

SlS-572 International Relations ofthe Middle East II (3) 

SOCY-225/SOCY-225GCa]lerBporaryArabWorid 3:2(3) 

Rtissia and Central Eurasia 

HIST-225/H1ST-225G Russia: Past and Present 3:2 (3) 
HIST-230 Early Russian History, 988-1700 (3) 
HIST-231 Inperial Rissia, 1700-1917(3) 
HIST-232 Twentieth Centuiy Russia (3) 
HIST-345 Russian Studies (3) (topics) 
LFS-200/LFS-200G Russia and the United States 3:2 (3) 



SIS-258 ConterT|»rary Russia (3) 
SIS-558 Authoritarianism and Demooacy inRusaa (3) 
Functional FieM of Concentration (9 credit hours) 

• Three courses in one ofthe following functional fields: 
Comparative and international race relations, global 
environmental pohtics, international business relations, 
intem^onal comnunicatbn, international development, 
international econonic relations, international politics, 
Mamie studies, peace and conflict resolution, or United 
States foreign poKcy 

Aminimumof two courses(6 credit hours) must be taken in 
SIS and a rrnnimum of two courses must be taken at the 300 
level cr above. 
Comparative and International Race Relations 

ANTH-210/ANTH-210G Rootsof Racismand htenacial 

Hanncmy 3-^ (3) 
COMM-534 Race, Gender, and flie Media (3) 
SIS-140/SIS-140G Cross-Cultural Coninunication 3:1 (3) 
aS-22D/SIS-220G Confrontiig Oir Difibrenoe&OiscovHing 

Our Sinilarilies: Conflict Resolution 3:2 (3) 
SOCY-210/SOCY-210G InequaKty: Class, Race, 

Ethnicity 4:2 (3) 
SOCY-351 Race and Ethnic Conflict (3) 
SOCY-553 MulticulturaUsm(3) 
Global Environmental Politics 

SlS-llO/SIS-1 lOG Beyond Sovereignty 3: 1 (3) 
SIS-337 International Developmrait (3) 
SIS-388 International Environmental Ftolitics (3) 
other courses approved by SIS 
Note: Faiticipstiaa in the Intranational Environment and De vel- 
opment Semester together witiiSIS-388 fid fills all requirements 
for ftiis ccarcentration 

International Business Relations 

Consult file SIS Undergraduate Office for a^ioved courses. 

International Communication 

SIS-340 Foundations of Intanational Cormmnication (3) 

SIS -341 Intocultural Comtttmication (3) 

SIS-349 Selected Topics in Interm«ional Coninunication (3) 
Intern ation al Developmen t 

ECON-1 lO/ECON-llOG The Gtobal Majority 3: 1 (3) 

BCON-3 1 8 Economic History (3) 

ECON-361Economic Development (3) 

EDU-285/EDU-285G Education for hilemational 
Development 3:2 (3) 

GOVT-235/GOVT-235G Dynamics of Political 
Change 3:2(3) 

HIST-120/HIST-120Ghnperialian and Revolutjon 3:1 (3) 

UT-l 50/Lrr-l 50G Third \^rld Literature 3: 1 (3) 

SIS-llO/SIS-1 lOG Beyond Sova^eigrty 3: 1 (3) 

SIS-337 Intenational Devdopment (3) 

SIS-536 Special Topics in Devekjpment Management (3) 

SIS-537 Special Topics in International Development (3) 



212 Sdiool of Mernatioiial Service 



SOCY-1 10/SOCY-l lOG Views from the 

ThiidWorid3:l(3) 
SOCY-365 Econornc Development and Social Change (3) 

Note: PartidpatiaQ in the liiemationalEnvBDnment and Devel- 

opnent Semester fiilfills all requirements forthis ooncentiatiaD 

Internaiional Economic Relations 
ECON-370 International EconMnics (3) 
ECON-371 International Economics: Trade (3) 
ECQM-372 International Economics Finance (3) 
SIS-215/SIS-215G Competition in an Interdependent 

Worid3:2(3) 
SIS-385 International Economic Policy (3) 
SIS-388 International Environmental Politics (3) 
SIS-389 %)ecial Topics in Policy Analysis (3) 
SIS-465 International Trade and Investment Relations (3) 
SIS-466 International Monetary and Financial Relations (3) 
SIS-504 Multinational Coipor^ons (3) 

International Politics 
mST-l 2(yHIST-l 20G Inperialism and Revohition 3: 1 (3) 
HIST-320 War and Diplomacy Napoleon to Bismaick (3) 
HIST-321 War and Pfeace: Bismarck to Mtler (3) 
SIS-llO/SIS-llOG Beyond Sovereignty 3:1 (3) 
SIS-215/SIS-215G Competition in an Interdependent 

Worid3:2(3) 
SIS-301 Theories of International Pcditics(3) 
SIS-321 International Law (3) 
SIS-322 Human Ri^ts (3) 
SIS-325 International Organizations (3) 
SIS-355 Relations of Western European Nations (3) 
SIS-504 Multinational Corporations (3) 
SIS-518 Legacy of \W)rld Warn Diplomacy (3) 

Islamic Studies 

RELG-105/RELQ-105G The Religious Heritage ofthe 

West 2: 1(3) 
RELG-185/RELG-185G Forms of flie Sacred Religjonsof 

the East 3:1 (3) 
RELG-370Islam(3) 
SIS-245/SIS-245G World of Islam 3:2 (3) 
SIS-364 Contemporary Mam and Iitfemational Relations(3) 
SIS-596 Selected Topics (3) with pennission ofthe 
student's advisor 

Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies 

• SIS-308 hlroduction to Peace and Ccnflict ResohHion (3) 
or 

SIS-328 Approaches to F^conaking (3) 
SIS-1 10/SIS-l lOG Beyond Sovereignty 3: 1 (3) 
SIS-220/SIS-220G Conflorting Our Differences/Discovering 

Our Similarities Conflict Resohlion 3:2 (3) 
SIS-321 WemationalLaw(3) 
SIS-322 Human Ri^ts (3) 
SIS-325 InteniatioiialOr^nizations(3) 
SIS-396 Selected Topics (3) with pennission ofthe 
student's advisor 



Note: Participation in the Peace and Conflict Resolution Semes- 
ta- fulfills all requiieraents fijr this concentration. 

United States Foreign Policy 
SIS-381 Foreign Policies ofthe Great Powers (3) 
SIS-382 Analysis of United Stales Foreign Policy (3) 
SIS-384 American Defense and Security PoUcy (3) 
SIS-385 International Economic Policy (3) 
SIS-389 Special Topics in Policy Analysis (3) (topic 

approved by advisor) 
SIS-396 Selected Topics (3) with permission of the 

student's adviser 
SIS-465 International Trade and InwstnKnt Relations (3) 
SIS-466 International Monetary and Financial Relations (3) 
SIS-581 Schools of Thou^t in Conten^xwary United States 

Foreign Ftolicy (3) 
SIS-583 Ltoited States in World Affairs (3) 
SIS-588 International Security and Arms Control (3) 
Note: Partidpation in the International Politics and Foreign Pol- 
icy SertKSter fulfills all requirements for this concentration. 

Senior Seminar (3 credit hours) 

• SIS-400 Senior Serrrinar in Inteniaticmal Relations (3) 

University Honors Program 

Students in fte University Honors Program have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honcrs in tiie major To fulfill 
requirensnts for University Honors in International Studies, 
students may enroU in Honors sections of upper-level SIS 
courses, University Honors CoUoquia tau^t by SIS faciity 
membws or SIS-350 Honors Colloquium in International 
Studies, or may arrange an Honors supplement to an SIS senior 
satdnar. The school's Honors coordinator advises students in 
the University Honors Program regarding sdiool options. 

B.A. in Language and Area Studies 

The B.A in Language and Area Studies is designed for stu- 
daits with a strong interest in a region ofthe workl and in a lan- 
guage of that region. This innovative pnogram achieves a 
balance between humanities and social sciences courses, cchq- 
bined with an advanced level of foreign language study. The 
program, jointly designed and adninistered by the College of 
Arts and Sciences (CAS) and the School of International Ser- 
vice (SIS), builds on the strengths ofthe CAS Department of 
Language and Foreign Studies (US) and the SIS field of Com- 
parative and Regional Studies. 

Admission to the Program 

To be considered for fiTeshman admission, an applicant 
should have earned at least a 3 .00 average in secondary school. 
Students from other regionally accredited collegiate institu- 
tions, and students in other programs at American University 
who have completed the fieshman year, should maintain a cu- 
rmlative grade point awrageof 3.00 (en a 4.00 scale) to be con- 
sidered for ttansfra- to ttie program 



School oflntematiooal Service 213 



Majors 

French/Europe, German^urope, Russian/Area Studies, or 
Sp>snish/l^tin Amaica 
University Requirements 

• Atotalofl20 credit hours 

• 6 credit hours of college wiitiiig 

• 3 credit hotrs of college nBthenxitics or file equivalent by 
enannnation 

General Education Requirements 

• Atotaloftencouises,consistingofonefoundationcoui8eand 
one second4evel course fiom an tqiproved sequence from 
each of the five curricular areas 

• No more than 6 credit hours nay be taken in the saoK 
discipline 

Major Requirements 

• 51 credit hours with grades of C or better 

• Ftoficiencyin the appropriate foreign language demonstrated 
by achieving a B (3.00) average or better for all course work 
in the foreign language taken in the Department of Language 
and Foreign Studies. 

Students may, where appropriate, arid with Faculty Advisory 
Comnittee approval, select spedal topics courses to fiilfill 
requiranents. Student may also apply up to 3 credit hours 
toward the major fix)man approved internship or cooperative 
education field experience. Study abroad course credits may 
be used toward ttie major with file approval of the Faculty 
Advisory Committee. 
Course Requirements 

Fouodation Cburses (9 credit hours) 

• SIS-105/SIS-105G Worid Pblitics 3;1 (3) 

• One iflercuhuralcomminicationcourse fiwnthe following: 
SIS-140/SIS-140G Cross Cultural Communication 3: 1 (3) 
SIS-340 Foundations of International Comminication (3) 
SIS-341 InterculturalCbmrninication(3) 

• One comparative politics course fiom the following: 
GOVT-1 30/GO\T- 1 30G Cbmparative Politics 3: 1 (3) 
GOVT-231 Third World Politics (3) 

GOVT-232 Politics of hidustrial Societies (3) 
Foreign Language Courses (18 credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours of course work ina single foreignlanguaged 
the 300 level or above. 

Area Studies (21 credit hours) 

• 1 5 credit hours, with 1 2 credit hovrs at the 300 level or above, 
in hunxtruties courses, including 3 credit hours fix3m the 
Department of History (HIST-xxx) and an additional 3 credit 
hours of course work with a strong historical component, 
fiom file following. Other appropriate area studies courses 
nay be substituted wifli the approval of the maJOT advisor 



French/Europe 

ARTH-101 European Art: RenaisEanceto file FresEOt (3) 

FREN-324 Civilisation Frangaise I (3) 

FREN-325 CivUisation FranQoise II (3) 

FREN-326 Fr«ndi Topes (3) 

FREN-327 Le Francis Commercial (3) 

FREN-328 French TrarBlation; Concepts and Practice (3) 

FREN-365 Les Registres du Frangais (3) 

FREN-432 Le Steele des Lumieres (3) 

FREN-433 LeRomantisme (3) 

FREN-434 Le Realisme (3) 

FREN-435 Lilterature Contemporaine (3) 

FHIL-311 Modem European Movemaits (3) 
German/Europe 

ARTH-1 1 European Art: Raiaissance to file Present (3) 

CTRM-336 German Topics (3) 

GERM-338 IntroductiDn to German Translation (3) 

GERM-432 Studies in German Hhn (3) 

CSRM-433 Gennan Lyric Ftoetry (3) 

GERM-438 German Qviliation I (3) 

CERM-439 German Qvilization II (3) 

HIST-239 Modem Germany since 1848 (3) 

fflST-318 Nazi Germany (3) 

LFS-230/230G Tbe Modernist Explosion: Culture and 
Ideology in Europe (3) 

FHIL-31 1 Modem European MoverriMits (3) 
Russian/Area Studies 

HIST-225/HIST-225G Russia: Past and Present 3:2 (3) 

HIST-230 Early Russian Hfetory, 988-1700 (3) 

HIST-231 hnperial Rissia, 1700-1917 (3) 

HIST-232 Twentieth Century Russia (3) 

HIST-345 Russian Studies (3) (topics) 
1X1-367 Russian and Soviet Literature (3) 
LIT-368 Dostoyevsky and Tolstoy (3) 
RUSS-347 Introduction to Russian Literature (3) 
RUSS^Ml Russian Nfedia and PbUtical Traislation (3) 
RUSS-543 Russian Classics (3) 
RUSS-548 Topics in Russian Studies (3) 
Spanish/Latin America 

HIST-241 Colonial Latin America (3) 
HIST-242 Latin America since Independence (3) 
HIST-340 Latin American Studies (3) (topics) 
LFS-210/LFS-210G Latin America: Kstory, Art, 

Literature 3:2 (3) 
S'AN-SSe Sipanish Topics (3) 
SPAN-357 Introduction to Latin American Literatue (3) 
a'AN-358 htroduction to SpaniA Translation (3) 
SPAN-359 Advanced Spanish Translation (3) 
SPAN450 Danish Civilization L Spain (3) 
SPAN^51 Spanish CiviUzstion 11: Lain America (3) 
SPAN491 S^ianish Internship: Proyecto Amistad {2-6) 
SPAN-554 Qassics of Latin American Literature (3) 
SPAN-559 Cblloquiumon Latin America (3) 



214 School of Intemadoiial Service 



• 6 credit hours of course woric in social science courses, 
selected fiom be following. Other appropriate area studies 
couses imy be substituted with the approval of flie mqor 
advisor. 

French/Europe 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 

ECON-3 18 Economic History (3) 

ECC8VI-351 Conpaiative Economic Systons (3) 

ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 

GOVT-232 Politics of Postindustrial Societies (3) 

GOVT-432 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Countries (3) (topics) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Sdected 

Regions (3) (tcpics) 
SIS-331 Overview of the Einopean Union (3) 
SlS-355 The Relations of West European Nations (3) 
SIS-530 Colloquium on fte Common Market (3) 
SIS-557 Foreign Policy Fomiulation in West European 

States (3) 
Germ an/Europe 
ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
ECON-3 18 Economic History (3) 
ECO^-351 Comparative Ecotcmic Systems (3) 
ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 
GO\'T-232 Politics of Postindustrial Societies (3) 
GOVT-432 Pobtical Institutions and Processes in Sdected 

Couiiries (3) (topics) 
GOVT-532 PoKtical Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
HIST-239 Modem Germany since 1848 (3) 
HIST-318 Nazi Genrany (3) 
SIS-331 Overview of the European Union (3) 
SIS-355 The Relations of West European Nations (3) 
SIS-530 Colloquiiimon the Common Market (3) 
SIS-551 Economy, Pohtics and Society in Europe (3) 
SIS-557 Foreign PoKcy Formulation in \\fest European 

States (3) 
Russian/Area Studies 

ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 

ECON-3 18 Economic History (3) 

ECON-351 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 

ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 

ECON-552 Economics ofTransition (3) 

GOVT-432 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Countries: Former USSR (3) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Regions: Eastern Europe (3) 
HIST-225/HIST-225G Russia; Past and f^esent 3:2 (3) 
HIST-230 Early Russian Mstoty, 988-1700 (3) 
HIST-231 Impaial Russia, 1700-1917 (3) 
HIST-232 Twentieth Century Russia (3) 
HIST-345 Russian Studies (3) (topics) 
LFS-200/LFS-200G Russia and the United States 3 :2 (3) 



SIS-258 Contemporary Russia (3) 
SIS-38 1 Foreign Policies of the Great Powers (3) 
SIS-558 Authoritarianism and Democracy in Russia (3) 
Spanish/Latin America 
ANTH-339 Culture Area Analysis (3) (topics) 
ECON-351 Comparative Economic Systems (3) 
ECON-361 Economic Development (3) 
ECaM-318 Economic History (3) 
GOVT-432 Pobtical Institutions and Processes in Selected 

Countries (3) (topics) 
GOVT-532 Political Institutions and Processes in Sdected 

Regions (3) (topics) 
HIST-241 Colonial Latin America (3) 
HIST-242 Latin America since Independence (3) 
HIST-340 Latin American Studies (3) (topics) 
SIS-276 Contaiporary Latin America (3) 
SlS-337 International Development (3) 
SIS-577 International Relations of the Americas (3) 
SOCY-531 Regional Studies in Social Change: Latin 

America (3) 
Senior Capstone (3 credit b9urs) 

• Students enroll either in an SIS comparative seminar or in an 
approved topics or seminar coiise in Language and Foreign 
Studies 

University Honors Program 

Students in the University Honors ProgBm have the oppor- 
tunity to graduate with University Honors in the major. To do 
so, students complete 12 hours of advanced-level Honors woric 
in the depaitment and, upon departmental recommendation, 
graduate with University Honors in flie major The department 's 
Honors cooidinator advises studfnts in the University Honors 
Program regarding departmental options. See the section on the 
University Honors Program for further details. 

Minor in Language and Area Studies 

• 24credithDurswithgradesofCorbetterandatleastl2aedit 
houis unique to the minor 

Course Requirements 

• 12 credit hours in the Department of Language and Fordign 
Studies at the 200 level or above, including two courses at the 
300 level. 

• 12 caedit hours selected from an approved list of courses in 
area studies: 

Courses include those from anthropotogy (ANTH-xxx), 
economics (EOON-xxx), history (HIST-xxx), international 
studies (SIS-xxx), literature (LIT-xxx), or sociology 
(SOCY-xxx); one 3-credit course rrust be at the 300 levd or 
above from SIS; one 3-ciBdit course must be from Ustoiy. 
Areas offered: 
French/Europe, German/Europe, Russian/Area Studies, Span- 
ish/Latin America; see list of apfaoved courses for rtBJor in 
Language and Area Studies, above. 



Schtx)l of International Service 215 



Japanese/Asia: coiKult LAS degree program advisor for ap- 
proval of courses for this minor. 

International Environment and 
Development Semester 

Admission to the n^gram 

Open to students thm the Wadungton Semester member in- 
stitutionsas part of the Washington SemesterFVogram and to ju- 
niors and seniors in good standing at American University. 
Students spend 12 weeks of the semesta- in Washington, D.C. 
and three weeks in Africa (fall semester) or Costa Rica (spring 
semester). 

Coirse Requk«maits 

• SIS-471 International Environmait and Development 

Seminar I (4) 

• SIS -472 International Envirornnent and Development 

Seminar 0(4) 

• SIS -473 International Environment and Development 

Research Project (4) 

• SIS-474 International Environmait and Development 

Intem^p (4) 
Note: PVticipation in this program fulfills all requirements for 
an International Development concentration for the B.A. in In- 
ternational Studies. 

International Politics and Foreign Policy 
Semester 

Admission to the Rvgram 

Open to students frcm the Washington Semester member in- 
stitutions and to juniors and saiiors in good standing at Ameri- 
can University. Recommended prerequisites for flie program 
are at least one course in govenmient or intematioied relations 
and one in eccDomics. 

Course Requiremciits 

• SIS ^91 Intematicnal PoKtics and R»reign Policy Soninar I (4) 

• SJS-492 International Politics and Foreign Policy Seminar 11(4) 

• SIS -493 International Politics and Foreign Fbbcy 

Research Project (4) 

• SIS-497 International Pbhtics and Foreign FbUcy 

Intem^p (4) 
Aregular course from the evening ofEering^ at American 
University rtBy be substituted for eifiKr the internship or the 
research project 
Note: Participation in this program fiilfills all requirements fbr a 
United States Foreign Policy concentration forthe B.A. in Inter- 
national Studies. 



Peace and Conflict Resolution Semester 

Admiiisian to the IVogram 

(^)p«j to students from the Wadiington SerrKster member in- 
stitiitionsaspart ofthe Washington Semester Ffegranandtoju- 
niois and seniors in good standing at American University. 
Course Requirements: 

• SIS -486 Peace and Conflict Resolution Seninar I (4) 

• SIS-4S7 Peace and Conflict Resolution Seminar 11 (4) 

• SIS-488 Peace and Conflict Resolution Research 

Reject (4) 

• SIS-489PeaceaiKiC(aiflictResolutionIntemsh^(4) 
Aregular course from the evening offerings at American 
Ltai versify nay be substituted for eithw the internship or the 
research prcg'ect. 

Note: Participation in &is program fulfills all requirements for a 
Peace and Conflict Resolution Studies concentration for the 
B.A in International Studies. 

Minor in International Studies 

• 21 credit hours with grades of C or better and at least 1 2 credit 
hours miquB to the minor, 15 credit hours ^ould be taken in 
SIS and 12 of these shsuldbe at the 300 level orabow. 

Course Requirements 

• SIS-105/SIS-105G World Rjlitics 3:1 (3) 

• One of the following: 

SIS-381 Foreign Policies of the Great Powers (3) 
SIS-382 The Analysis of United States Foreign Policy (3) 
SIS-384 American Defense and Security Pohcy (3) 
SIS-385 International Ecoix3mic Policy (3) 

• One of the following: 

SIS-258 Contenporary Russia (3) 

SIS-264 Contenporary Middle East (3) 

SIS-265 Contemporary Africa (3) 

SIS-276 Ccntenporary Latin America (3 ) 

SIS-355 The Relations of Western European Nations (3) 

• One of the following: 

SIS-301 Theories of Intemational Politics (3) 

SIS-321 hitemational Law (3) 

SIS-325 Intematkmal Organizaticms (3) 

SIS-340 Foundations of International Comniinication (3) 

SIS-349 Selected Topics in Intem^onal Conxnunicaticn (3) 

• 9 credit hours in a functional field or regional area 
specialization: 

Comparative and intemational race relations, global 
envirormiental politics, intemational communication, 
iitemational devebpment, international economic relations, 
intemational politics. Islamic studies, peace and conflict 
resolution, or United States foreign pohcy 
or 

Africa, the Amaicas, Asia, Eaope, the Middle East, or 
Russia and Cential Eurasia 



216 School of Iidemational Service 



Combined B.A. in International Studies 
and Master's Degree 

Admission to the Program 

This program enables highly qualified students to earn both 
a BA. in International Studies witti a fimctional concentration 
in any area of speciali2ation offered by the School of Intema- 
ticnal Service, and an M.A in International Afiairs, Interna- 
tional Communication, International Development, or 
International Peace and Conflict Resohitioa 

Admisaon to ttje combined BA./M.A. program requires ju- 
nior or senior standing a cumulative grade point average of 
3.50, aminimum 3.50 grade point average in SIS courses, a for- 
riBl appUcation, a written faculty recommendation, and an es- 
say on the student's academic interests and abilities in 
international afiairs. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
is not required. Interested students should contact the SIS Grad- 
uate Admisaons Ofiice. 
Course Requirements 

• All requirements for the B.A. in International Studies 
For graduate degree programs requiring up to 36 credit hours, 
undergraduate students nBy apply 6 credit hours of qjproved 
500-tevel course work to satisfy the requirements for both 
degrees. 

For graduate degree programs requiring up to 39 credit hours, 
undergraduate studoits may apply 9 credit hours of af^jroved 
5004evel course weak to satisfy the requirenents for both 



For graduate degree pro grams requiring up to 42 credit hours, 
undergraduate students may apply 12 credit hours of 
approved 500-level course work to satisfy the requirements 
for both degrees. 
• AH requirements for the M.A in Intematioiral Aflfeirs, the 
M.A. in International Commurucation, the M.A. in 
International Developmait, or the M.A in International 
Peace and Conflict Resolution, including a minimum of 24 
credit hours completed in residence in graduate status after 
the undergraduate degree has been awarded. 

Combined Bachelor's Degree and 
M.A. in Global Environmental Policy 

This program enables qualified students to earn both an un- 
dergraduate degree (in any field) and an MA. in Global Envi- 
rcnmental Pohcy. The coni)ined program can be completed 
with four years of undergraduate study plus 1 2 irunths of addi- 
tional study (fall and firing semesters plus a summo' of re- 
search or internship). The program offers students an 
opportunity for strong training and careers in environmental 
poUcy. 
Admission to the Program 

Lfadergraduates should apply for admission to the combined 
program by tiie end of the junior year. At a minimim, students 
mist have a minimum overall grade point average of 3.00, a 



year of laboratory science (BIO-1 10/210 General Biobgy VR, 
CHEM-1 10/210 General Chemistry I/Il, PHYS-105/205 
College Phyacs I/II orPHYS-l 10/210 University Physics I/II), 
and a year ofcalculus (MATH-221/222, MATH-21 1/212). Ap- 
plications rraist be accorrpanied by two lettas of recommenda- 
tion and a statement of purpose. Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) scores are not required for admissian to the combined 
program Students should discuss their interest in the program 
with the environmental studies coordinator before submitting 
an appUcatioo. 

Requirements 

• All requirements for a B.A. or B.S. (in any major) at 
American University 

Undergraduate students nay apply 6 credit hours o f approwd 
500-level course work to satirfy the requirements for both 
degrees. ENVS-580Environmaital Science I atri ENVS-58 1 
EnvironrrBntal Science Dare recorrmended. 

• All requirements for the M.A in Global EnvironmentEil 
PoUcy, induding a mirrimim of 24 credit hours completed in 
residence in graduate status after the undergraduate degree 
has been awarded. 

Undergraduate Certificate in 

European Studies 

Certificate Requirements 

• 18 credit hours of approved course work wifli at least 9 credit 
hours at ttie 300-level or above with grades ofC or better 
Grades of C- or D in catificate program courses are not 
accepted toward the fiilfillment of certificate requirements, 
although Siese grades will be included in ttie calculation ofthe 
GPA Students must have at least a 2.0 GPA in certificate 
courses in order to be awarded a certificate. Students in 
certificate programs must take a minimum of 6 credit hours 
during each 1 2-month period and cortplete the certificate in 
four years. International studerls must enroll in 9 credit hours 
each semester (except for summer). A itBximan of 3 credit 
hours earned at an accredited college or university may be 
applied toward flie certificate as transfer credit 

• Foreign language proficiency 

• Study abroad or approved internship with a European focus 

• Capstone: successfiil completion of a 3 credit-hour European 
studies research jjroject conducted under flie supervision of a 
faculty rrsmber associated with the European studies 
certificate program. 

Course Requirements 

• 1 8 cjedit hours of approved European studies-related course 
work including study abroad or approved internship wi4i a 
European focus, and a 3 oedit hour capstone. Students should 
take at least one course oiAside of their main area, discipline, 
or fidd. 



School of Intematicoal Service 217 



Undergraduate Certificate in 
International Affairs 

AdmissifMi to the IVogram 

Open to students in enrolled in a degree pnagram or at least 
junior standing or equivalent. Applicants must submit SAJ' 
scoies and their ollkial transcripts along with a one page state- 
ment of purpose. For irtemational students whose fiist lan- 
guage is not English, a score of at least 550 (213 on the 
conputer version) on the TOEFL is required. 
Certificate Requtremeuts 

• 24 credit hours of approved course work with at least 1 2 credit 
hours at the 3004evel or above with grades of C or better. 
Grades of C- or D in certificate program courses will not be 
accepted toward the iiilfiljment of cotificate requirements 
althou^ these grades will be included in the calculation o f the 



cumulative grade point average. Students inist have at least a 
20 grade point average in certificate courses in order to he 
awarded a certificate. Students in certificate programs must 
like a minimum of 6 credit hours during each 1 2-montti 
period after they are admitted. Intematioisil students must 
enroll in 1 2 credit hours each semester (except for summer). 
All programs mist be completed within four years. A 
maximnn of 6 ciedit hours earned at an accredited college cr 
university rtBy be appUed toward the certificate as transfer 
oedit. 
Course Requirements 

• One ofthe following; 
SIS-105/SIS-105G WoridPblitics 3:1 (3) 
SIS-140/SIS-140G Cross-Cultural Communication 3:1 (3) 
other jpprowd General Education Course 

• 21 credit hours in courses approved by the advisor, induding 
one course which serves as a capstone course. 



Graduate Programs 



M.A in International Af&irs 
conc&itrations: 

Comparative and Regional Studies (CRS) 

International Economic Relations (lER) 

International Politics (IP) 

United States FoKign Policy (USFP) 
M.A in Metnational Communication 
M.A in International Development 
M.A in International Peace and Conflict Resolution 
M.A in Ethics, Peace, and Gfobal Affairs 
M.A in Global Environmental Polby 

Dual Degree FVograms: 
MA. in International Affairs and J.D. 
MA. in International Affairs: concentration in 
Natural Resources and Sustainable Development 
with United Nations University for Peace, Costa Rica 
M.A in htemational Development and 

Master of Theological Studies 
M.A in International Peace and Conflict Resolution and 
Master of Arts in Teaching or Master ofTheological Studies 

Master of International Service (executive program) 
M.S. in Developmait Management 
Ph.D. in International Relations 



M.A. in International Affairs 

Admission to the IVogram 

AppJicants must hold an accredited bachdor 's degree w itti a 
cumilative grade point average of at least a B+ (3.30 or higher 
on a 4.00 scale) and should have had at least 24 credit hours of 
social science course woik relevant to international studies. Stu- 
dents who do not meet these ninimim requirements, if other- 
wise adnissiUe, may be assigned additional course work in 
excess of degree requirements specified at the time of admis- 
sioa 

The application deadline for fell admission is Janxiary 15; 
for ^jring admission October 1 (September 15 for international 
students). Adrritted students may defer matriculation for no 
longer than two semesters provided that a written request for de- 
ferment is submitted to and approved by the SIS Graduate Ad- 
missions OfiBoe. 

AH applicants except students whose degree was earned at 
an institution where English was not the language of instmcticn 
are required to submit results ofthe aptitude sectionof fceGrad- 
uate Record Examination (GRE). International applicants 
whose degree was not conducted in English and/cr whose na- 
tive language is not English are required to submit results ofthe 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The minimum 
TOEFL score for fuU consideration is 600 (250 on the computer 
veraon). LSAT scores will be accepted in place of flie O^i for 
J.DTM.A applicants. Fall applicants should plan to take ttie ap- 
propriate test no later than Deceniwr to ensure full consider- 
ation ofthe application by the January deadline. 

All applicants must submit two letters of reference evaluat- 
ing unda'graduate acadonic performance and suitability for 
graduate study in international aiSiirs, at least one of whidi 
should be from an acadonic source. A resuiTB should be in- 



218 School of Inteniatioiial Service 

chided in the ajjjAicatiDn. ^^phcants must submit transcripts 
from all institutions attraided Cultural iactois are considered in 
evaluating transcripts and examination results. 

Requests for the transfer of a maximum of 6 graduate credit 
hours from other accredited institutions to be ap[jied to a mas- 
ta-'s degree are considered after successful conpletion of 9 
credit hours in the graduate program at American University. A 
minimum grade of B in each course is required for transfer. 
Tiansfa- courses trust have been completed within seven years 
of admission and must fulfill stated requirements of the degree 
program 

Oegfree Requirements 

• 39-42 credit hours of approved graduate course wodc witti a 
cumulatiw grade point avwageof 3.00, including a rrnnimim 
of 1 8 credit hours in a major field induding one theoiy course 
and one graduate-level econoirics or intematicoal economic 
pohcy course ^^propriate to ttie field, 9 credit hours in a 
related fidd selected fromoffaings in SIS or other teaching 
unitsof the university, 6 credit hours in social science research 
methodology aid 6 credit hours of research. 

• Comprehensive examination in the major field 

To be eligible to take a camprehensive examination, students 
musthavemaintained at least a3.00 grade pointaverage(ona 
4.00 scale) in all graduate course woriL See the SIS Graduate 
Advising Office for comprehensive examination 
requirements for each fiekl. 

• Demonstration of research and writing skills through 
conpletion of a master's thesis, substaidial research p^ier 
requirement, or research pradicum All courses taken to 
fulfill this requirement mist be passed with a grade of B or 
better. 

Theas: 6 credit hours of thesis credit and submission of the 



Substantial research papra' requirement one 3 credit hour 
internship or cooperative education field experience and one 
3 credit hour substantial research paper, or two substantial 
research papers 

Research practicunr 6 credit hours supervised by major fidd 
faculty advisors (by permission and specific anangenieDt). 
• Proficiency in a modem fcreiga language: 

Research competence in English and another language 
relevant to the student's career objectives must be certified. 

Major Field Concentratioiis 

Comparative and Regional Studies (CRS); International Bco- 
ncmic Relations (DSR); International Politics (IP); United States 
Foreign Policy (USFP), or Natural Resources and Sustainable 
Development (NRSD) (through exchange program witti United 
Nations University for Peace, Costa Rica) 



Course Requirements 

COMPARATIVE AISD REGIONAL STUDIES (CRS) 
(39 credit hours) 

Major Field (18 credit hours) 

• SIS-672 Theories of International and Conparative 

Studies (3) 
or 
approved course in comparative theory (3) 

• One of the following: 

SIS-589 Global Political Economy (3) 

SIS-673 Comparatiw Political Ecotcmy (3) 

or other approved course in comparative economics (3) 

• 12 credit hours of course work in a regional ccncoitratbn: 
Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Russia and 
Central Eurasia, or yamic Studies. 

Related Field (9 credit hours) 

• Three approved couses fiom one of the other major field 
groups in SIS: Global Environmental Policy (GEP), 
International Communication (IC), International 
Devdopment (ID), Intemational Eccmomic Relations (lER), 
International Peace and Conflict Resolution (IPCR), 
International PbUtics (IP), and United States Foreigii Pohcy 
(USFP). 

or 
Three courses making up an optional related field and 
approved by the student's faculty advisor 

Social Science Research Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in Intonational Afl&irs (3) 

• methodokigy course ap[iT}priate to the studait's resesrch 
interests (3) 

Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-797 Master's Thesis Supervision (6) 

or 

Substantial research papa* reqinrement 
Note. The thesis (or at least 3 credit hours of flie substaatial 
research paper requirement) mist relate to the regicmal and 
conparative agjectsof fee CRS fieU. A practicum research 
couise must receive prior approval from the faculty advisor. 

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS (lER) 
(39-42 credit hours) 

Major Field (lg-21 credit hours) 

• ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 

Note: Students with a strong background in economics may 
have this course requirement waiwd without substitution 
with f)ermission of advisor. 

• SIS-616 International Economics (3) (prerequisite: 

ECON-603 or equivalent) 

• SIS-665 Intemational Trade and Investment Rdations (3) 

• SIS-666 Intemational Monetary and Financial Relations (3) 



Sdiool of International Service 219 



• 9 crtxlit hours ofintemational economic pohcy courses from 
either SIS cr other departments, in an area sudi as trade and 
investments, money and finance, business, law and policy, or 
an individually-designed area, with the approval of the 
faculty advKor 

Reliited Held (9 ci«dit hours) 

• Three approved courses from one of the other major field 
groups in SIS: Corr^Mrative and Regional Studies (CRS), 
Global Environmental Policy (OEP), International 
Coimiiunication (IC), International Development (ID), 
International Peace and Conflict Resolution (IPCR), 
International Politics (IP), or United States Foreign Policy 
(USFP). 

or 

Three courses making up an optional related field (induding 
iilemational business) and approved by the student's fiiculty 
advisor 

Social Sdence Research Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in International Aj&irs (3) 

• methodology course appropriate to flie student's researdi 
interests (3) 

Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• aS-797 Master's Thesis Si^jervision (6) 

or 

Substantial research paper requirement 
Note: The thesis or substantial research paper must relate 
clearly to the field ofintemational economic relations. 
INTERNATIONAL PM^ITTCS <ff) (39 «Tedit hours) 
Major Field (18 ci«dit hours) 

• BCON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 

or 
apptovsA course in economics (3) 

• SIS-«)lTheoryinInteniatiOTalRdatians(3) 

or 
SIS -604 Masterworks of International Relations (3) 

• 12 credit hours in&e International PoUics (IP) fidd proposed 
by the studmt in a statement of purpose and approved by the 
student's faculty advisor 

Related FWld (9 credit hours) 

• Three ooursBS from one ofthe other major field groups in SIS: 
Comparative and Regional Studies (CRS), Global 
Environmertal Fblicy (GEP), International Comnunication 
(IC), International Development (ID), International 
Economic Relations (IHK), International Peace and Conflict 
Resolution (IPCR), or United States ForeignPolicy (USFP). 

or 

Three courses making up an optional related field apfroved 
by the student 's feculty advisor or the SIS Graduate OfQce. 

Sodal Science Research Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 QvBntitative Analysis in International Afl&irs (3) 



• methodology course appropriate to the student's research 
interests (3) 

Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-797 Master's Thesis Si^jervision (6) 

or 

Substantial research peper requirement 
Note: The thesis or substantial research papa* must relate 
clearly to the field of international poKtics. 

UNITED STATES FOREIGN P«-ICY (USFP) 
(39 credit hours) 

Major Field (18 credit hours) 

• SIS -689 Seminar in Policy Analysis (3) 

or 

SIS-581 Schools of Thought in Contenporary U.S. Fweign 
FbUcy(3) 

• One of the following: 

BCON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 
SIS-615 Fundamaitalsof US. Foreign Economic Pohcy (3) 
approved course in economic poHcy (3) 

• SIS-682 United States Foreign Pohcy (3) 

• 9 CTedit hours fiwn the following 

SIS-581 Schools of Thought in Contenporary U.S. Foreign 

Ftohcy (3) (if not »ised to fiilfill requiremert above) 
SIS-583 United States in Wsrld Affaire (3) 
SIS-588 International Security and Anns Contrd (3) 
SIS-619 Special Studies in International Politics (3) (tq)ic 

approved by advisor) 
SIS-683 Congress and U.S. Foreign Ftolicy (3) 
SIS-684 National Secaity RjUcy (3) 
SIS-685 United Slates-Rusaan/Euasian Security Relaticns (3) 
SIS-689 Seminar in Pohcy Analysis (3) (if not used to fulfill 

requirement abow) 
or apiroved SIS courees relating directly to U.S. foreign 
policy, country- or region-specific topics, intemjiional 
economic policy or issues such as law, iUicit drugs, 
inteUigence, and arras control. 
Related Field (9 credit hours) 

• Three approved courses from one of the oflier major field 
groups in SIS: Cortqarative and Regional Studies (CRS), 
Global Environmental Policy (GEP), International 
Communication (IC), International Development (ID), 
International Economic Relations (lER), International Peace 
and Conflict Resolution (IPCR) or Intanational Ftolitics (IP). 

or 

Three courses making up an optional related field approved 
by the student's &culty advisor or the SIS Graduate Office. 

Sodal Sdence Research Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in Intematiooal Affairs (3) 

• nethodology course appropriate to the student's research 
interests (3) 



220 School of International Service 



Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-797 Master's Thesis Supervision (6) 

or 

Substantial research paper requirement 

Note. The thesis or substantial research paper must cleaily 

relate to tbe field of U.S. foreign policy. 
NATURAL RESOURCES AND SUSTAINABLE 
DEVELOPMENT (42 credit hours) 
Note: This concentration is available only toough the exchange 
piogram witii United Nations University for Peace, Costa Rica 
Contact the SIS Graduate Office fijr more informatioa 
Major Field (29 credit hours) 

• ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 
or one of the fdlowing: 

ECON-579 Environmental Economics (3) 
SIS-616 International Economics (3) 
^)pro ved economics coinse 

• SIS-637 loteinational Development (3) 

or 
SIS-649 Environmait and Development (3) 

• SIS-660 Environment and PoUtics (3) 

• 11 credit hours of SIS-602 AU-University for Peace 
Exchange topics courses 

• additional 9 credit hours of approved SIS graduate courses 

Social Science Research Methodology (7 credit hours) 

• SIS-602 AU-Ltoiveisity for Peace Exchange (topics) 

Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-602 AU-Ltoivereity for Peace Exchange: 

Intem^p (3) 

• SIS-795 Master's Research Requirement (3) 

M.A. in International Affairs and J.D. 

Graduates receive the J.D. degree from the Washington Col- 
lege of Law and the M. A. in International Afi&irs from the 
School of Intemational Service. 
Admission to the Program 

Students apply to bofti the Wadiington College of Law 
(WCL) and the School of hiem^onal Service (SIS). Studaits 
nay begin their studies in SB after completing one fiill year of 
fiill-timB study at WCL SIS accepts LSAT scores in place of the 
GRE general scores normally required for admisaon. For ^- 
cific criteria employed by SIS, see the graduate adovission and 
degree requirements for the M.A. in Intemational Affairs 
above. Admission to either WCL or SIS in ns way inqiies that 
admission to the other will be granted. Students who have been 
adnntted to the M.A. in Intemational Afl&irs may apply to 
WCL. For more information on admission requirements, con- 
tact the WCL Admissions Office at 202-2744 101. 
D^ree Requirements 

• 86 credit hours of WCL course work 

Up to 6 credit hours of SIS course work may be credited 
toward the J.D. requirement. 



• 39 credit hours of^jpoved graduate course vwrk in an SIS MA 
in InlematiDrial Affitirs oonoaitration : Oon^Brative and Regicnal 
Studies (CRS), IntCTnatbnal Economic Relations (lER), 
Intemational PoHtics (IPX or United States Foreign Policy 
(USFP). 

Ujp to 1 5 oedit hours in W(X comes may be credited toward flie 
M. A requirements (see approved list in the SIS Graduate OIBoe). 

• Proficiency in CHie modem foreign language 

• Corrprehensive examination 

• Thesis or substantial research paper requirement 
Course Requirements 

• approved major theory course (3) 

• approved major field course (3) 

• approved research rrethods course (3) 

• approved economic or business policy course (3) 

• 9 credit hours of approved related field courses 

• 6 credit hours ofmaster's thesis or substai^alreseardi paper 
requirement option 

• Up to 1 5 oedit hours in WCL course vrork including the 
following 

LAW-5 1 6 Legal Rhetoric Writing and Researdi I (2) 
LAW-5 1 7 Legal Rhetoric: Writing and Reseanii II (2) 
5 credit hours of approved intranational law course work 

M.A. in International Communication 

Admission to the Program 

Students applying for admission to this program must have 
had a strong undergraduate major or minoT in sodal and behav- 
ioral sciences or commmicalion. For flirther infotmation, contact 
the International Commmication Division at 202-885-1621 . 

AppUcants must hold an accredited bachelor's de^ee wiftt a 
cirrrulative gade point average of at least a B+ (3.30 or higher on 
a4.00 scale) and should have had at least 24 aedit hours of social 
sdenoe course week rdevait to irrtemational studies. Studoits 
vvho do not meet these minimnn requirements, if otherwise ad- 
missible, may be assigned additicmal coirse work in excess of de- 
gree rec^urenents specified at the time of adnission. 

Tbe apphcatim deadline for fall admission is January 15; for 
spring admission October 1 (Septrariber 15 for international stu- 
dents). Admitted students ruE^ defer matriculation fca- no Icnger 
then two senssters provided ftiat a written request fir deSrmrat is 
siintiitted to and approved by flie SB Graduate AdnissiorK OflSce. 

All applicants except students whose degree was earned at 
an institution where Enghsh was not the language of instmction 
are required to submit results of the aptitude section of the Grad- 
uate Record Examination (GRE). Intemational appUcants 
whose degree was not conducted in Fnglish and/or >^hose na- 
tive language is not En^h are required to submit results of tiie 
Test ofEnglish asa Foreign Language (TOEFL). The rrininirm 
TCEFL score for fiill consideration is 600 (250 onttre computer 



School of Intanational Service 221 



version). Fall applicants ^ouldplanto take the appropriate test 
no later than December to ensure full consideration of the appb- 
cation by the January deadline. 

All applicants must submit two letters of reference evaluat- 
ing undergraduate academic performance and suitability for 
graduate study in international affeirs, at least one of which 
should be from an academic source. A resume should be in- 
cluded in the application Applicants rtust submit transcripts 
from all institutions attended. Cultural factors are considered in 
evaluating transcripts and examination resulta 

Requests for the transfer of a maxinum of 6 graduate credit 
hours from other accredited institutions Id be q)pUed to a mas- 
ter 's degree are considered after successful conpletion of 9 
credit hours in the graduate program at American University. A 
minimum grade of B in each course is required for transfw. 
Transfer courses must have been completed within seven years 
of admission and niist MM stated requirements of the degree 
program. 

Degree Requirements 

• 39 credit hours of approved graduate course work with a 
cumulative grade point average of 3 . 00, including a minimum 
of 12 credit hours in the rrajor field including one theory 
course and one gradiate-level economics or international 
economic policy course appro{Hiate to the field, 15 credit 
hours in a concentration/related field selected from offerings 
in SIS or other teaching units of ftie university, 6 credit horns 
in social scioice research methodology, and 6 credit hours of 
research. 

• One oral comprehensive examination in international 
communication 

To be eligible to take a comprehensive examination, students 
mist have maintained at least a 3 .00 grade pdnt average (on a 
4.00 scale) in aU graduate course work 

• Demonstration of research and writing skills through 
completion of a master's thesis, substantial research paper 
requirement, or a research practicum AU courses taken to 
ftilflll this requirement must be passed with a grade of B or 
better. 

Thesis: 6 credit hours of thesis credit and submission of the 
thesis. 

Substantial research paper reqwrement: one 3 credit hour 
inlem^p or cooperative education field experience and one 
3 credit hour substantial research paper taken in conjuncticn 
with a 600- or 700-lewl course; or two substantial research 
papers taken in conjunction with 600- or 700-level courses 
Reseamh practicum: 6 oedithouis supervised by major field 
faculty advisors (by pomission and specific arrangement). 

• Rt)ficiency in a modem foreign language: 

Research competence in English and another language 
relevant to the student's career objectives imst be certified. 



Course Requirements 

Major Field (12 credit hours) 

• SIS -640 International Comnunication (3) 

• SIS-642 Cross-Cultural Communication (3) 

• SIS-643 Political Economy of International 

Comnunication (3) 
or 

SIS-644 Communication and Social and Eiconomic 
Development (3) 

• SIS -645 International and Comparative 

Communication Pohcies (3) 
Concentration/Rehted Field (15 credit hours) 

• Courses approved by the studeri's faculty advisor selected 
from one concentration. Students may design their own 
concentration with the approval of the faculty advisor. 
Exan^ies of concentrations include: 

Intercultural Relations 
Geopolitics cf Information 
Global Media Studies 

International Communication and Development 
International and Comparative Communication Policy 
International Communication and Information Technology 
Social Science Research Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analyas in htemationalAf&irs (3) 

• SIS-695 Research Seminar in International 

ComiTunication (3) 
Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-797 Master's Thesis Sn)ervJsion (6) 

or 

Substantial research paper requirement 
Note: The thesis or substantial research peper mist relate to 
the field of International Communication. 

M. A. in International Development 

Admission to the ntigram 

Apfdicants must hold an accredited bachdor 's degree wittt a 
cumilative grade point average of at least a B+ (3.30 or higher 
on a 4.00 scale) and should have had at least 24 credit hours of 
social science course weak relevant to international studies. Stu- 
dents who do not nset these mininiim requirements, if other- 
wise adrrissiUe, may be assigned additional cxjuise work in 
excess of degree requirements specked at the time of admis- 
sion 

The application deadline for fell admisaon is January 15; 
for spring admission October 1 (September 15 for international 
students). Adnitted students may defer matriculation for no 
longer than two semesteis pro vided that a written request for de- 
ferment is submitted to and approved by the SIS Graduate Ad- 
missions 0£5oe. 

All applicants except students whose d^ree was earned at 
an institiition \xhere EngH^ was not the language of instruction 



222 School of International Service 



are required to submit resuhsof the aptitude section of flie Grad- 
uate Record Examination (ORE). International applicants 
whose degree was not conducted in E^lish and/or whose na- 
tive language is not En^ish are required to submit results of the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The nini- 
mun TOEFL score Sx full consideration is 600 (250 on the 
computer version). Fall applicants should pian to take the ap- 
pnopriate test no later than Etecember to ensure fiiU consider- 
ation of the efjplication by the January deadline. 

All applicants must submit two letters of reference evduat- 
ing undergraduate academic performance and suitabihty for 
graduate study in international affairs, at least one of which 
should be fiom an academic source. A resume should be in- 
cluded in the app^cation. AppUcants must submit tiansoipts 
fiom all institutions attended. Cultural fectois are considered in 
evaluating transcripts and examination results. 

Requests for the transfer of a maximum of 6 graduate credit 
hours fiom other accredited institutions to be apfdied to a mas- 
ter's degree are considered after successM coiipletiDn of 9 
credit hours in the graduate program at American University. A 
ninimum grade of B in each course is required for transfer. 
Transfer courses irust have been completed within sewn years 
of admission and must fiilfill stated requirements of tiie degree 
program 

Degree Requirements 

• 39-42 credit hours of approved graduate course woric witti a 
cumulative grade point average of 3.00, including a nininum 
of 15 credit hours in the core, 15 credit hours in a 
concentration/related field selected fiwm offerings in SIS or 
other teaching units of the univereity, 6 credit hours in social 
science researdi methodology, and 6credit hours of research. 

• Cornjrehaisive exanination in the major field 

To be eligible to take a comprehensive examination, studsnts 
musthavemaiiSained at least a3.00 grade pointaverage (on a 
4.00 scale) in all graduate course work. The comprehensive 
examination requirement includes research group meetings 
plusan oral research presoitaticn in conjunction with a thesis, 
substantial research paper, or practicum. 

• Demonstration of research and writing skills through 
conpletion of a master's thesis, substantial research pqwr 
requirement, or research practicum AH courses taken to 
fulfill this requirement rtust be passed with agrade of Bor 
better. 

Thesis: 6 credit hours of tiiesis credit and submission of the 

thesis. 

Substantial research paper requirement one 3 credit hour 

internship or cooperative education field experience and one 

3 credit hour substantial research paper, or twj sii>staitial 

research papers. 

Research practicum 6 credit hours supervised by major field 

faculty advisors (by permission and specific airangen:ent). 

• ProficieiKy in a modem ftjeign language: 



Research competence in English and anottier language 
relevant to the student's career objectives must be certified. 
Course Requirements 

Core (12-15 credit hours) 

• ECON-603 Intnxluction to Economic Theory (3) 

(may be waived by the division director, which reduces the 
total required credit hours to 39 and the core course credit 
hours to 12) 

• ECON-661 Survey of Economic Development (3) 

• SIS-636 MicropoUtics of Devdopment (3) 

• SlS-637 International Development (3) 

• One of the following 

SIS-533 ftpulation. Migration, and Development (3) 
SIS-616 International Economics (3) 
SlS-650 Global Economy and Sustainable Development (3) 
SIS-651 Managing Economic Policy Reform (3) 
SIS-635 Advanced Topics in Development Managanent 

Community Development (3) 

Rural Development (3) 

Urban Development (3) 
Concentration/Related Field (15 credit hours) 

• Courses ap^jroved by the student's faculty advisor selected 
fiom one concentration. Amaxirnumof 6 credit hours fiom 
SIS-633 Selected Toprics in International Communication, 
SIS-638 Selected Topics in Intanatioaal Developmait Skills, 
and SIS-639 Selected Topics in Intemational Conflict 
Resolution Skills may be included. Students may design their 
own concentration with flie ajiptoval of ttie faculty advisor. 
Examples of concentrations inchide: 

Community Development and Basic Needs 

Development Finance and Banking 

Development Education 

Development Management 

Development Policy 

Economics and Finance and Intemational Economic Policy 

Entrepreneurship and Small Business 

Envircmment and Development 

Gender Studies and Development 

NGOs and Development 

Social Science Research Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in Intanatiooal Afibirs (3) 

• appnoved methodology course appropriate to the studoit's 
research interests (3) 

Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit liours) 

• SIS-797 Masttr's Thesis Supervision (6) 

or 
Substantial research paper requirement 



School of Intematiooal Service 223 



M.A. in International Development and 
Master of Theological Studies 

A dual master's degree [rograni is offered by the School of 
Internatiunal Service and Wesley Theological Seminary. Grad- 
uates receive both ttie MA. in International Etevetopment and 
the Mastff of ITieological Studies. 
Admission and Requirements 

• AppUcations are submitted to botti SIS and Wesley. Students 
trust be admitted separately to each program 

• Studentsmay count upto 9credithours from Wesleytowaid 
the related field/concoitratjon requiranent for ttie MA. in 
International Development, and an additional 3 credit houis 
toward the research requirement if they select the thesis 
option. 

Please refer to the NNfesley Theological Seminary catalog for a 
description of the degree requiremaits for the Master of Theo- 
logical Studies, or call the Admissions OfiSce at 202- 88 5 -8652. 

M.A. in International Peace and 
Conflict Resolution 

Admission to the n-ogram 

Applicants must hold an accredited bachelor 's degree with a 
cumjlative grade point average of at least a B+ (3.30 or higher 
on a 4.00 scale) and should have had at least 24 credit hours of 
social science course work relevant to international studies. Stu- 
dents who do not meet these minirrum requiiements, if other- 
wise adnissiUe, may be assigned additional course work in 
excess of degree requiranents specified at Ak time of admis- 
sioa 

The application deadline for fell admission is January 15; 
for ^jring admission October 1 (September 15 for international 
students). Adnitted students may defer matriculation for no 
longer than two semesters pro vided that a written request for de- 
ferment is submitted to and appxjved by the SIS Graduate Ad- 
missions OflSoe. 

AH apphcants excqit students whose degree was earned at 
an irKtitution where English was not the language of instruction 
are required to submit results of the aptitude section of the Grad- 
uate Record Examination (GRE). International applicants 
whose degree was not conducted in English and/or whose na- 
tive language is not Imglish are required to submit results of the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The minimum 
TOEFL score fijr Ml consideration is 600 (250 on the computer 
version). Applicants should plan to take the appropriate test no 
laterthan Deoanber to erBure full consideraticHi of the applica- 
tion by the January deadline. 

All applicants must submit two letters of reference evaliat- 
ing undergraduate academic performarKe smd suitability for 
graduate study in interrational afiiiirs, at least one of which 
should be from an academic source. A resume should be in- 
cluded in the application. Fall applicants mist submit tran- 
scrqjts from all institutions atterxied. Cultural factors are 
considered in evaluating transcripts and examinatian results. 



Requests for the transferof a maximim of 6 graduate credit 
hours from other accredited institutions to be applied to a mas- 
ter's degree are ccnsidered after successful completion of 9 
credit hours in the graduate program at American IJniversity. A 
mirrinrum grade of B in each course is required for transfer. 
Transfer courses must have been completed within seven years 
of admission and mist fiilfill stated requirements of the degree 
program. 

Degree Requirements 

• 39 credit hours of approved graduate course work with a 
cumulative grade point average of3.00, includingaminimum 
of 12 credit hours in the major field including one theory 
course and one 3 credit graduate-level economics or 
irlemational economic policy course appropriate to the field, 
12 credit hours in a coacentration/related field selected from 
offerings in SIS or other teaching units of the university, 6 
aedit hours in social scierxse research methodotogy, and 6 
aedit hours of research. 

• Comprehensive examinatico in flie major field 

To be digiWe to take a comprehensive examination, students 
mist have maintained at least a 3.00 grade point average (ona 
4.00 scale) in all graduate course work. The corrprehensive 
examination requirement includes research group meetings 
pJus anoral research presentation in coigunction with athesis, 
s\d}stantial research paper, or practicum. 

• Demonstration of research and writing skiUs through 
completion of a master's thesis, substantial research paper 
requirement, or research practicum. All courses taken to 
fidfiU this requiranent must be passed with a grade of B or 
better. 

Thesis: 6 credit hours of ttiesis credit and subrrission of the 

thesis 

Substantial research paper requiremait: one 3 credit hour 

istem^p or cooperative education fidd experiatce and one 

3 credit hour substantial researdi paper, or two substantial 

research papers 

Research practicuoi: 6 credit hours supervised by major field 

faculty advisors (by pennisaon and ^lecific arrangerrEnt). 

• Rxjficiency in a modem foreign language: 

Research comp^ence in English and another language 
relevant to the student's career objectives mist be certified. 
Course Requirements 

Major Field (12 credit hours) 

• SIS-606 Culture and ftace and Conflict Resolution; 

Alternatives to Violence (3) 

• SIS-607 Peace Paradigms (3) 

• SIS -609 Conflict Analysis arrd Resolution: Theory and 

Ftectioe (3) 

• SIS-610 Theory ofConflict, Violence and Mr (3) 

Economics (3 credit hours) 

• One of the following: 



224 School of Intematiciiial Service 



ECON-603 Introduction to EcoDomic Theory (3) 
SIS-673 Comparative Political Economy (3) 
approved course in economics (3) 
Related Field (12 credit hours) 

• Four couises approved by the IPCR feculty from one of the 
major field groins in SIS: Comparative and Regional Studies 
(CRS), Qobal Environmental Policy (CEP), latematicnal 
Communication (IC), International Development (ID), 
International Economic Relations (lER), International 
PoKlics (IP), or United States Fbreiga Policy (USFP). 

or 

Four courses approved by the student's faculty advisor 
making up an optional related field or an academically-sound 
concentration defined by a central concept which allows the 
student to focus on a particular area of interest 

Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in International Affaiis (3) 

• SIS-61 2 Research Seminar in Peace and Conflict 

Resolution (3) 
or 
SIS-639 Selected Topics in Intonational Conflict 

Resolution Skills (1-3) (total of 3 credit hours) 
or oflier spproved methods course (3) 
Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-797 Master's Thesis Supervision (6) 

or 
Substantial research paper requirement 

IVLA. in International Peace and Conflict 
Resolution and Master of Arts in Teaching 

Graduates receive an M.A. in Intonational Pfeace and Con- 
flict Resolutbn finm the School of Intematiooal Service and the 
M.A.T. in secondary education fiom the School of Education. 

Admisaon to the Program 

Applicants must hold an accredited badielor's degree with a 
cumuWve grade point average of at least a B+ (3.30 or hi^er 
on a 4.00 scale) and should have had at least 24 tredit hours of 
social science course work relevant to international studies. Stu- 
dents who do not meet these minimum requirements, if other- 
wise admissible, may be assigned additional course work 
specified at die time of admission 

Students must apply to both the School of International Ser- 
vice (SIS) and the School ofEducation (SOE) in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Admission to either of the participating 
teaching units in no way implies admisaon to the other unit. For 
mare information on admissions requirements, contact the SIS 
Admissions Ofiice at 202-885-1 646 orthe SOE Teacher Educa- 
tion Office at 202-885-3720. 

All a{^Ucants are required to submit results of &e aptitude 
section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Interna- 
tional appUcants whose first language is not English are re- 
quired to submit results of the Test of English as a Fordgn 



Language (TOEFL). The minimum TOEFL score for full 
consideration is 600. All appUcaits mist submit two letters of 
reference evaluating undergraduate academic performance and 
suitability fijr graduate study in international af&irs and educa- 
tion. 

Students sedcing secondary education certification must 
have completed sufficient course work in an area traditionally 
taught in secondary schools. It is anticipated that students Mio 
complete the M. A in Intemational Peace and Conflict Resolu- 
tion will have sufiicient badcground to meet certification re- 
quirements in social studies. However, students who meet 
requirements for other subject areas will also be considered. 
Students will be notified at the time of admission concerning 
additional course work required for state certification. 
D^;ree Requirements 

• 57 credit hours of ^iproved graduate course woik witti a 
cumulatiw grade point average of 3.00 

Studoits mist complete the 9 oedit hours in the education core 
couises, 12 oedit hours in secondary educftion, 6 credit hours 
of student teaching, and at least 12 ofthe 1 5 credit houis in peace 
and conflict resolution to receive the MA.T 
Students mist complete 15 credit hours in peace and conflict 
resolution, 3 credit hours in economics, 6 credit hours in 
methodology, 6 credit hours in research and writing, and the 9 
credit hours in the education core to receive the M.A. in 
International Peace and Conflict Resolution. 
In addition to intensive course work and student teaching 
placements, students are also required to participate in an 
educational internship pirogram These field (dacements are 
carefully supervised and coordinated to meet state 
certification requirements. 

• Proficiency in a modem foreign language 

• Conprehoisive examination in international peace and 
conflict resolution 

• Comprehensive examination for MAT. 
Course Requirements 

Education Core (9 credit hours) 

• EDU-521 Foundations ofEducation (3) 

• EDU-541 Foundations of Special Education for 

Exceptional Children (3) or 
EDU-545 Overview of All Exceptionalities: The Arts in 
Spedal Education (3) 

• EDU-620 Theories of Educational ftychology and 

Human Development (3) 
Secondary Education TVack (12 credit hours) 

• EDU-520Reading, Writing, and Literature across the 

Curriculum (3) 

• EDU-522 Principles of Effective Methods and 

Instiuction (3) 

• EDU-540 Methods and Materials in Secondary 

Education (3) (or ottier approved methods courses) 



Sdiool of International Service 225 



• EDU-662 Classroom Management (3) 

Student Ifeacling (6 credit hours) 

• EDU-699Studert Teaching (6) 

Peace and Coaflict Resolution (15 credit hours) 

• SIS-605 Theory of Cooperative Global Politics (3) 

• SIS-606 Culture and P6ace and Conflict Resolution: 
Alternatives to Violence (3) 

• SIS-607 Peace Paradipns (3) 

• SIS -609 Conflict Analysis and Resolution: Theory 

and Practice (3) 

• SIS-6 10 Theory of Conflict, Viotence and ^^^ (3) 

Economics (3 credit hours) 

• BCON-603 Intnxluction to Economic Theory (3) 

Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analyas in htemational Afl&irs (3) 

• SIS-6 12 Research Seninar in Peace and Conflict 

Resolition (3) 
or 
SIS -639 Selected Topes in International Conflict 

Resolution Skills (1 -3) (total of 3 credit hours) 
or other approved meftiods course (3) 
Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-691 hitemship (3) 

• SIS-795 Master's Research Requirement (3) (substantial 

research paper (SRP) 

M.A. in International Peace and 

Conflict Resolution 

and Master of Theological Studies 

A dual master's degree program is offered by the School of 
Intranational Service and Wesley Theological Seminary. Grad- 
uates receive both ttie MA. in International Peace and Conflict 
Resolution and the Master of Theobgical Studies. 
Admission and Requirements 

• Applications are submitted to botti SIS and Wesley. Students 
mist be adnitted separately to each program. 

• Studeils may count up to 1 2 credit hours from Wesley toward 
the MA in International Peace and Conflict Resolution Witti 
SIS faculty appjoval, 9 a«dit hours fiilfiU the related field 
requiranent, and 3 credit hours count toward ttie researdi 
requirement 

Please refer to the ^\fesley Theological Seminary catalog for a 
descriptiaD of the degree requiremaits for the Master ofTheo- 
logical Studies, or call the Admissions Office at 202-885-8652. 

M.A. in Ethics, Peace, and Global Affairs 

Admission to the Rvgram 

The M.A. in Ethics, Peace, and Global Afiairs is an interdis- 
ciplinary program administered jointly by the School of Inter- 
national Service (SIS) and the Department of Phitosophy and 
Religion in the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS). 



Students may apply to either the DepartriBnt of Philosophy 
and Religion or the School of International Service. The Gradu- 
ate Record ExamiiBtion (ORE) is required. Studerts applying 
to SIS mist 3pp\y by January 15 for &11 and October 1 for 
spring to be considoed for merit -based aid. 
Degree Requirements 

• 39credit hours of approved graduate work including 6 credit 
hours of research course wcric with grades of B or better 

• Comprehensive examinatian requirement 
CAS: submission of three qualifying papers 

Course Requkements 
Core (12 credit hours) 

• FHIL-525 SemirBT on Modem Kforal Problems (3) 

• FHIL-693aobal Ethics (3) 

• SIS-607 Peace Paadigms (3) 

• SIS-614 Ethics in Intanational Af&irs (3) 

Foundation (6 credit hoars) 

• FWL-520 Seminar on Ethical Theory (3) 

• SIS-622 Human Rights (3) 

Research Methodology (3 credit hours) 

• SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in International Afiaiis (3) 

or 

qualitative research seminar 
Research and Writing (6 credit hours) 

• 6 credit hours from fee following: the thesis or substantia 
research paper and internship must relate clearly to the 
student 's ccncentration and be si^rvised by faculty teaching 
rdated courses: 

PHIL-797 Mastra-'s Thesis Seminar (6) 

or 

FHIL-691 Internship in Philosophy (3) and 
FHIL-702 Qradxate Seminar in Philosophy 

or 

SIS-691 Internship in IntematiorEd AflBiirs (3) (md 
SIS-795 Master's ReseardiRequiremHit (3) 

• 12 credit hours inoneofthefoUowingareasof concentration; 
Peace and Conflict Resolutitn 

• SIS-609 Conflict Analysis and Resolilion: Theory an! 

PtBctice (3) 

• Three courses frcxn the following 

FHIL-61 3 Studies in Asian Philosophy (3) (appiroved topic) 
IHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-5 15 Islamic Peace ParadigoB (3) 
SIS-516 Peacebuilding in Divided Societies (3) 
SIS -5 17 Gaider and Conflict (3) 
SIS-540 Conflict and Devebpment (3) 
SIS-^06 Culture and Fteace and Conflict Resolution: 

Alternatives to \felence (3) 
SIS-611 International Negotiation (3) 



226 Sdiool of International Service 



SIS-613 Reconciliation and Justice (3) 
SIS-619 ^)ecial Studies in International Balitics: 

Human Rights and Oonflict (3) 
Human R^ts and Social Justice 

• Fourcomses fiom the following: 
PHIL-6 1 6 Femimst Philosophy (3) 
PHILr6 1 7 Race and Philosophy (3) 

PHILr686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved topic) 

SIS-613 Reconciliation and Justice (3) 

SIS-517 Gender and Conflict (3) 

SIS-619 Special Studies in Intemational Fblitics: 

Human Ri^ts and Conflict (3) 
SIS-621 International Law and the Legal Order (3) 
Global Environniental Justice 

• SIS-660 Environment and Politics (3) 

• Three courses fixam the following: 

PHIL-686 Selected Topics in Philosc^y (3) (^jproved topic) 
SIS-619 ^)ecial Studies in Intematicnal FbUtics: 

Global Hnvironmental PoUtics and Policy (3) 
SIS-649 Environment and Development (3) 
SIS-663 Wellington Woricshop; Advanced Studies and 

Research in Environmental Policy (3) 
Ethics ofDevelopment 

• SIS-637 Intemational Development (3) 

• Three courses from the following: 

PHILr686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved 

topic) 
SIS-540 Conflict and Development (3) 
SIS-636 Micropohtics ofDevelopment (3) 
SIS-647 Governance, Democracy, aid Develcpnent (3) 
SIS-648 Woman and Development (3) 
SIS-649 EnvironnMnl and Dewlopment (3) 
SIS-650 Global Economy and Sustainable Development (3) 
International Economic Justice 

• SIS-616 Intemational Economics (3) (pra«quisite: 

ECCN-603 Introduction to Economic Theory) 

• Three courses from the following: 

PHILn686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (jqjpro ved topic) 
SIS-504 Multinational Corporations (3) 
SIS-587 Globahzation; Power, Production, and Culture (3) 
SIS-650 Oobal Economy and Sustainable Development (3) 

(prerequisite: SIS-637 Intemational Development) 
SlS-665 International Trade and Investment Rdations (3) 
SIS-666 International Moaetaiy and Financial Relations (3) 
SIS-673 Comparative Political Economy (3) 
Oobal Governance and Intemational Organizations 

• SIS-621 hitemational Law and the Legal Orda- (3) 

• SIS-625 International Organizations (3) 

• Two courses fiom the following; 

PHILr686 Selected Topics in Philosophy (3) (approved topic) 
SIS-587 Caobalization: Power, Production, and Culture (3) 



SIS-605 Theoiy of Cooperative Global Politics (3) 
SIS-647 Governance, Democracy, and Development (3) 
SIS-672 Theories of Con^Hiative and IntematioDal Studies (3) 

M.A. in Global Enviroiimental Policy 

Admission to the Program 

j^>phcants must hold an acoedited bacfaelot's degree with a 
cumulative grade point average of at least 3 .30 (on a 4.00 scale). 
Students who do not meet these ninimim lequirements, if oth- 
erwise admissible, may be assigned additional course work in 
excess of degree requirements specified at the time of admis- 
sion. Students should normally have several years of profes- 
sional or practical experience. The Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) is required. International applicants whose 
degree was not conducted in En glish and/or whose native lan- 
guage is not English are required to submit resultsofthe Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The minimum 
TCEFL score for full consideration is 600 (250 on the computer 
version). Fall applicants should plan to take the appropriate test 
no laterthanDeccmberto ensure Ml consideration of ttie apph- 
cation by the January deadline. 

All appUcants must submit two letters of reference evaluat- 
ing undergraduate academic performance and suitabiUty for 
graduate study in intematicnal affairs, at least one of which 
should be fiom an academic source. A resume should be in- 
cluded in ttie application. Applicants niist subnit transcripts 
6am all institutions attended. Cultural &ctois are considered in 
evaluating transcripts and examination results. 

The application deadline for fall admission is January 15; for 
spring admision October 1 (SeptEni>er 15 for international stu- 
dents). Admitted students may defer mstriculation far no longer 
than two semesteis provided ibat a written request fir de&anat is 
sifcmitted to sod approved by file SB Graduate Adnissdons OfBoe. 
Degree Requirements 

• 39 credit hours of approved graduate course work wifli a 
mininumcunulative grade pdnt average of 3.00, including 
21 oedit hours in the core, 3 credit homs in social science 
research naethodology, and 6 credit hours of research 
Requests for the transfer of a maxinura of 6 graduate credit 
hours trom other aocredied institutions to be ^ipUed to a 
master's degree are considered after successful comj^tion of 
9 credit hours in the graduate program at American 
University. Aminiirum grade ofB in each course isrequired 
for transfer Transfer courses must have beai con^leted 
within seven years of admission and must fulfill stated 
requirements of the degree program 

• Comprehensive examination ; a maximum of two attempts is 
permitted 

• Demonstration of research and writing skills through 
completion of a master's fliesis or substantial research pqier 
requirement. Allcoursestakento fulfill this requirement mist 
be passed witii a grade of B or better. 

Theas: 6 credit horns of fiiesis credit and submission of the 
thesis 



School oflntematinnal Service 227 



Substantial research paper requirement: one 3 credit hour 
iitemship or cooperative education field experience and one 
3 credit hour substantial researdi paper, or two substantial 
research papers 

• PVoficiency in a irodem foreign language 

Research competence in English and another language 
relevant to the student's career objectives niist be certified 

Course Requirements 
Core (21 credit hours) 

Theory (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-660 Environment and Politics (3) 

• One of the following: 

LAW-61 8 International Environmental Law (3) 
SlS-619 Special Studies in International Politics: 

Global Environmental Pohtics and Policy (3) 
SIS-649 Environment and Development (3) 
Economics (6 credit hours) 

• ECON-579 Environmental Economics (3) 

• BCON-500 Microeconomics (3) or 
BCON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 

Science (6 credit hours) 

• ENVS-580 Enviromnental Science I: A Quantitative 

Approach (3) 

• ENVS-581 Environmental Science n: A Quantitative 

i^jproach (3) 
Methods (3 credits) 

• One of the following: 
CSC-610InlrodudiontoGeographic Information Systems (3) 
PUAD-601 Mefljods of Problem Solving I (3) 

SIS-600 Quantitative Analysis in Intetnatioaal Af&irs (3) 
An approved methods course 
Capstone (3 credit hours) 

• SIS-663 Washington Waikdiop: Advanced Studies and 
Research in Enviromnental PoUcy (3) 

Area of Concentration (9 credit hours) 

• 9 credit hours in a focused area selected in consultaticii wifli 
advisor 

Research Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-797 Master's Thesis Siqjervision (6) 

or 
Substantial research paper lequiiemeit (6) 

Master of International Service (M.I.S.) 

The Master of International Savice is specificaBy designed 
for those with sigmjicait experience in international affairs. 
The program's two semester intenave period of study is com- 
plemented by opportunities for participating in an aray of pub- 
lic dialogue and ongoing research programs. 



Adnussioo to the ftogiram 

Applicants must hold an accredited badielor 's degree wi& a 
cumilative grade point average of at least B^ (3.30orhi^eron 
a 4.00 scale). Students who do not neet these nininiim require- 
ments, if otherwise admissiHe, may be assigned additional 
course work in excess of degree requirements specified at the 
time of admission. Students should also have significant profes- 
sional experience, typically nine years. 

The appbcation deadline for fall admission is May 1 , for 
spring acknission, October 1 (Septembe- 15 for international 
students). Admitted students may defer matriculation for no 
rrwre than two semesters provided that a written request for de- 
ferment is submitted to and approved by the SIS Graduate Ad- 
missions Office. 

All applicants are required to submit official transcripts and 
translations from their utxlergraduate institutions and two letteis 
of reference evaluating their suitabihty for the mid-career mas- 
ter's program in international service. Iitfemational apfiicants 
whose Gist language is not English are required to subnit re- 
sults of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 
Apjiicanls should pJan to take the TOEFL prior to Deceirfcer to 
ensure full consideration of the application by the May 1 dead- 
line. Finally, applicants mist submit an essay outlining ttieir sig- 
nificant professional experience, highlighting the background 
they would contribute to the program, and their motivation for 
graduate study The essay should also contain a brief description 
of ttieir intended programof study. 
Degree Requirements 

• At least 30 credit hours of approved graduate course woik 
with a cumulative grade point average of 3.00, including 24 
credit hours in residence. 

Students with significant prior professional experiaice in 
international ai&irs may apply to the SIS Dean's Office to 
have the total programreduoed by up to 6 credit hours, which 
will be appUed to the independent study requirement Such 
application must make re ference to areas in wiiidi the student 
has acquired professional competence. Students seeking to 
use the significant professional experience dause are limited 
to a tctel of 6 credit hours, including any transfer credit. 

• Non-thesis option: SIS-686 Proseminar in Lntemational 
Afiairs I arxl SIS-687 Prosaninar in International AfSirs n, 
with grades or B or better, as part of the 24 credit hours in 
residence; these courses also fiilfill the tool of research 
requirement 

• Comprehensive examination completed in conjunction wifli 
SIS-687 Proseminar in International Affairs II (consult 
program office for details) 

Coirse Requk«ments QO credit hours) 

• 18 credit hours (six courses) in residence selected in 
consultation with and approved by the SIS associate dean or 
cKvision directors 

• SIS-686 Proseminar in Intonational AflFairs I (3) 

• SIS-687 Proseminar in International Afiairs D (3) 



228 Sdiool of Intemational Service 



• SIS-690Indepaident Study Project (6) approved by the SIS 
senior associate dean 

M.S. in Development Management 

The MS. in Development Management offers a unique op- 
portunjy forcombining development and pMic admimstration 
to provide slate of the art training and practice in development 
managensnt, as fiesently being devebped both in the United 
Slates and at important centers in the Third Worid. American 
Univeraty's Washington, D.C. locaticm provides a special op- 
portunity to become ferailiar with major international develop- 
ment organizations and to meet with noted scholars and 
piactiticmers active in &e field. 
Admission to the Program 

Applicants itiist have at least two years field experience 
woricing on development problems or projects in ttie United 
Slates, Western Europe, or in developing countries, 

AppUcants must hold an accredited bachelor's degree with a 
cimulative grade point average of at least a B+ (3 .30 or higher on 
a 4.00 scale)and ^uld have had at lead 24 oedit hoursof social 
sdence couise wctk relevad to intemational studies. Studaits 
who do not meet ttiese minimim lequiiements, if otherwise ad- 
nissible, may be assigned additional cou'se \wik in excess of de- 
gree requirements ^^ecified at &e time of admissicn. 

The appUcation deadline for fall admission is January 15; 
for spring admissbn October 1 (September 1 5 for international 
students). Admitted students may defer matriculation for no 
longer ttian two semesters provided that a written request for de- 
ferment is submitted to and approved by the SIS Graduate Ad- 
missions Office. 

All applicants except students whose degree was earned at 
an institution where English was not the language of instruction 
are required to sutmit results of the aptitude section of the Grad- 
uate Record Examination (ORE). Intemational applicants 
whose degree was not conducted in English and/or whose na- 
tive language is not En^h are required to submit results of the 
Test ofEnglish asa Foreign Language (TOEFL). The minirrum 
TCSFI^ score for fiill consideration is 600 (250 on the computer 
version). AppUcants should plan to take the appiopnaie test no 
later than December to ensure full consideration of the applica- 
tion by the Januaiy deadline. 

All applicants must suhnit two letters of reference evaluat- 
ing undergraduate acadetnic performance and suitabihty for 
graduate study in international a£&irs, at least one of which 
should be fiom an academic source. A resume should be in- 
cluded in the apjdication. AppUcants must submit transcripts 
fiom all institutions attaided Cxiltural &ctors are considered in 
evaluating ttanscripts and examination results. 

Requests for ttie transfer of a maximum of 6 graduate oedit 
hours from ottier accredited institutions to be appUed to a master's 
degree are considered after ^ccessfiil completico of 9 credit 
hours in ttie graduate program at American Univa^ty. A mini- 
num grade of B in each course is required br transfer Transfer 
courses must have been conpleted within seven years of admis- 
sicD and must fiilfill staled lequirenents of the de^ee program 



Degree Requirements 

• 39-42 credit hours of approved graduate course work witti a 
ciunulative grade point averageof 3 00, including a minimum 
of 18 credit hoirs in the core, 12 oedit hoirs in a related field 
selected fiom offerings in SIS or other teaching units of the 
university, 6 credit hours in social science research 
methodology, and 6credit hours of research. 

Amid-le wl professional who has performed successfully in a 
technical or managerial role before admission to the program 
may apply through ftie director of the M.S. in DevelopnBnt 
Management program to the dean of SIS to have the total 
program lequirements reduced by up to 6 credit hours. This 
application may be made after cottfdetion of 9 credit hours 
and rmst make reference to a number of areas in vAnch the 
student has acquired basic competence. Oedit earned as part 
of an internship program does not count in this pro visioiL 

• Research requirement; 6 credit hours of practicum research 
with grades of B or better 

• Cornprehensive examination requirement completed in 
conjunction with practicum research 

To be eligible to take a ccnprefaensive examimtion, students 
must have maintained at least a3.00 grade point average (on a 
4.00 scale) in all grtduate couise work. The comprehensive 
examinatiDn requirement includes research group meetings 
plusan oral research psesentation in conjui]ction withathesis, 
substantial research paper, or practicum. 

• Proficiency in a modem foreign language: 

Research competeiKe in English and another language 
relevant to the studait's career objectives must be certified. 
Course Requirements 

Core (15-1 8 credit hours) 

• ECON-603 Introduction to Economic Theory (3) 

Note, may be waived by division director, which reduces the 
total credit hours required for the program to 39and total core 
course credit hours to 1 5. 

• ECON-661 Survey of Economic Development (3) 

• SIS-636 McropoUtics ofDevetopment (3) 

• SIS-637 Intemational Development (3) 

• PUAD-614 Development MarBgement (3) 

• One of the following 

MGMr-609 Orgaimational Behavior and Human Resource 

Management (3) 
PUAD-612 PubUc Administration in the Policy Process (3) 
Concentration/Related Field (12 credit hours) 

• Four courses approved by the student's faculty advisor 
selected fiom one concoitration. L^ to 6 credit hours in 
SIS-638 Selected Topics in Intemational Developnoit Skills 
may be included. Students may design their own 
concentration wifii flie approval of the fecuhy advisor and the 
MSDM director. Examples of concentrations include: 

Development Management and Information Systems 



School of International Service 229 



Entrepreneurs/lip and Small Business 
Program and Project Management 

Social Science Research Methodology (6 credit hours) 

• SIS -600 Quantitative Analysis in International AQairs (3) 

or 

other approved course in social science research 
nKthodology 

• qjproved methodology course tppropriate to the student's 
research interests (3) 

Research and Writing Requirement (6 credit hours) 

• SIS-693 Practicum: Action Research in Development 
Management (6) (with a gtade of B or betto-) 

Ph.D. in International Relations 

Admission to the Ax>gram 

The Doctor of Hubsophy in International Relations pro- 
gram is designed to prepare graduates for careers in university 
teaching and research. The curriculum combines core offerings 
in international relations, corrparative social theory, compara- 
tive and regional studies, and methodology within a structure 
that allows students conaderable flexibility. Major enq>hasis is 
placed on research. In addition to oom{ieting the dissertation, 
students are escouraged to present conference papers, en^ige in 
collaborative vwjrk with feculty members^ and submit articles to 
refereed journals. 

Applicants for the Ph.D. degree program rmst hold an 
accredited bachelor's or master's degree or its equivalent in a 
field related tointematioiBl relations. AppUcants should present 
a prior cumulative grade point average that is substantially 
above B (3. 50 or hi^er on a 4.00 scale) in a field relevant to in- 
ternational relations 

The program is designed for study on a fiill-tinK basis. Ap- 
plicants fi)r the PhD. degree are considered and admitted only 
for ttie fall semester each year. The school does not pemit stu- 
dents to begin their doctoral work in the spring Deferral of ma- 
triculation in the PhD. pcogiam is not pennitted. In order to be 
considered for fall admission, applicatiaas and all supporting 
materials must reach the SIS Oraduate Admbsions Office no 
later than January 1 . 

All applicants are required to submit results of ttie Graduate 
Record Exaninaticai (ORE). Intemational apphcants whose 
first language is not Enghsh are required to submit resultsof the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The minimum 
TOEFL score fijr full consideration is 600 (250 on the corrputer 
version). Applicants should plan to take the anMofriate test no 
later than December to ensure consideration of their applica- 
tions by &e January 1 deadline. 

AH applicants must subnit at least ttiree letters of reference 
which evaluate their academic perfwinance and their suitability 
for undertaking doctoral study in intemational relations Cul- 
tural factors are considered in making admissions decisions and 
in evaluMing transcripts and examination results. 

Doctoral studerts may transfer ip to 30 a«dit hours ofprevious 
graduate course wodc earned at aca«cfited instititions with a mini- 



mum giBde of B in each course. Previously earned graduate crudits 
are applied to FhD. program requininents if they are relevant to 
students' programs and di»«rtation topics. Requests for trarsfer of 
graduate credit are considered at ttte tsne of advarcement to candi- 
dacy. Credits corrpleted more ttian seven years before ttie semester 
of matriculation are mt traosferablc. 
Degree Requiremaits 

• 72 credit hours of approved gradiiate course work, induding 
at least 12 credit hours of dissertation supervision. A 
minimim grade point average of 3.25 in all course work is 
required to remain in good standing and to earn the degree. 
Ph.D. students may take SIS-790 Doctoral Independent 
Study in corrjunction with their course work with permission 
of instructor and the director of ftie FttD. program. 

• Proficiency in one modem language. Language proficiency 
should be in an area relevant to the student's research. 
Certiffcation is by university-administered examination. 

• Proficiency in social science research methodologies 
(ppropriate to the student's field of study and dissertation 
topic. Normally this requirenKnt is satisfiedbyconpleting 12 
credit hours of courses in research methods, as described 
under Course Requirements, below. 

• Regular participation in the semi-monthly PhD. research 
seminar during the first three years of residency. Studoits are 
expected to present theresultsoftheir ongoing research and to 
serve as discussants for papers presented by faculty and 
visiting scholars to the university. 

• Satisfactory completion of two written and two oral 
comprehensive examinations. 

The oral qualifying exam ination, normally given at the end of 
the first year, examines students on theoretical, 
epistemological, and rrethodological literature and issues in 
intemational relations, comparative social theory, and 
comparative and regional studies These areas are addressed 
in the core seminars that students normally cortplete during 
their first year of residence, although the scope of the 
examination is not limited to topics covered in the seminars. 
The oral qualifying examination evaluates students' 
preparation in subjects that are ccmsidered to be an essential 
foundation for doctoral study and research in the School of 
Intemational Service. 

fHitten field conprehensive examinaticms are taten in two 
major fields of study selected by the student. One field rtust be 
designated fiom the graduate examinatian fields offered by the 
School of Intemational Service as PhD. level fields of 
ooncenlration. Aascondfieldmaybe selected fixanofferings of 
SIS or from the ofiaings of other teaching units of the 
university that provide doctoral instructioiL As an alternative, 
studerds may construct a special fieM, with permissicm of the 
director of the PhD. program and the advice of £t least three 
qualified sdiolars Two of ttese sdiolais must be meniers of 
the American University faculty; all three riBJSt agree in writing 
to serve on an examining committee. Students are normally 



230 School of Memational Service 



expected to conplete flieir written field examinations no later 
than three years after entering the program 
The oral defense of the prospectus examines students on thdr 
dissertation proposals and on substantive issues, literature, 
theory, qjistemology, and methodology relevant to the 
proposed dissertation researdi. Exeuniners are qualified 
scholars designated by the director offlie Ph.D. program, who 
chaiis the examination. Two of ftie examiners must be 
membersofthe American University faculty. Examiners wiU 
usually be pro^jective members of ftie student's dissertation 
committee. Students are nDrmally e^Kcted to complete their 
prospectus defense no later flian the end of the seventh 
semester after entering the program. 
For detaib on scheduling corrprehensive examinations and 
examination paocedures, consult the director of the PhD. 
program or tiie SIS Qraduate OflSce. 

• Advancemenl to candidacy: to be advanced to candidacy, 
students mist remedy any defldencies specified at &e timeof 
admission, be certified as proficioit in a modem fordgn 
language in addition to Enghsh, conplete their social science 
research methodology requirement, declare their 
comprehaisi ve examinatbn fidds of coooeiitration, and pass 
the oral defense of prospectus. 

• Acceptance by the faculty cf the Sdiool of International Service cf 
a £&serta&vi pn:;posa/[ The dissertation pic^xtsal niust provide a 
justification for the dissertation research, review relevant 
literature, identity rdevant theoretical, epistemological, and 
methodological issues, and provide a detailed research design, 
including a timetable for completion of the woik. 

The dissertation proposal is first presented at the oral defense of 
the prospectus. Hawevcr, success passage of the defense of the 
prospectus and approval of ttie dissertdion proposal are separate 
but overifpping processes. Ailer ttie defense of prospectus is 
passed, the dissataticn proposal nust be fcrmaUy approved by 
the dissertation committee and by the dean. 
Usually, flie scholars selected as examines also review the 
dissertation proposal and are the prospective membas of the 
student's dissertation committee. Two merrfcers of the 
reviewing committee must be members of ttje American 
University faculty and one must be a &cutty member of the 
School of International Service. 

• Completion of the doctoral dissertation and successful 
defense cf the dissertation in an oral examination. The 
dissertation must consist of high quality original research, 
directly relevant to the student's doctoral program. 
Dissertation committees comprise a minimum of three 
menfcers, one of whom serves as chair and as &e {Himary 
supervisor of the dissertation researdi. It is the respoosibiUty 
of the student to secure the agreement of a fiill-time tenured or 
tenure track member of ftie School of Intemational Service 
faculty to serve as the chair of his or her dissertation 
committee. At least two members of dissertation comttiittees 
must be fiill-time tenured or tenure track members of the 



American University &culty . The manbas of fee committee 
must be approved by the dean of the School of IntetnaticDal 
Service. Students must successfiiUy defend their dissertation 
in an oral exansnation on an occasion to which the entire 
American University conamunity is invited, customarily with 
two weeks prior notice. Students mist presed a coopleted 
draft of their dissertation for defense. They are responsible for 
having the final draft of their dissertation nxet university style 
requirements. Dissertations must be approved by the dean of 
the School of International Service. 

• Statute of limitations: American University's v4cacfem(c 
Regulations provide that all work fir the doctorate must be 
corr^deted within five years fixxnthe date c£ first enrollment as , 
doctoral student (seven years if the studert entaed a doctoral 
program with abachdor'sdegree). Prior to the expiration ofthe 
time limit ^cified (or to ttie expiration of qjprovedextensicos) 
a student